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THE 



1929 MIRROR 



BATES COLLEGE 



LEWISTON, MAINE 




Editor-in-Chief, JAMES N. SOLOMON 

Business Manager, LAWRENCE C. LeBEAU 



m 



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ARTHUR NEWTON LEONARD, A.M., Ph.D. 



'Dedications 

— *$ — 



uln Dr. Arthur N. ICrmiaru, our brluuru 
frtettu *' Sittrluj," mini Ijaa bttams rtturarcn 
to all ttniar uiljfl rjaur Ijau tlj? prtuilrnr rtf 
ktummin. tjtnt rtttirr in or mrtatur of rlaHH, 
uir Immtnht oeoiratr mtr 1929 fUtrrnr. 



A Christian gentleman and sympathetic teacher, 
whose wit and optimism make him popular in 
social gatherings ■ — ■ a professor who can enter 
sympathetically into the joys and sorrows of stu- 
dent life, because he remembers his own, and a 
man who teaches great moral lessons without 
preaching. For thirty years he has been at Bates, 
first as instructor of French and now as professor 
of German. As a symbol of our appreciation of 
" Dutchy," we dedicate our Class Book to a teacher 
who trusts and sympathizes with his students. 











Contents^ 




Campus Views 

Faculty 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Student Administration 

Christian Associations 

Publications 

Debating 

Music 

Societies 

Dramatics 

Athletics 

Women's Athletics 

Humor 

Advertisements 






'j 



Foreword 



^ 



In the hope that Within these covers 
you will find a true reflection of class 
and campus life^we present the^ 
Nineteen twenty -nine (fJYlirror 



% 




PAGE SEVEN 



35fo£ t^^0 ' fjjjB , Hit y t^otr 




PAGE EIGHT 




PAGE NINE 




PAGE TEN 




PAGE ELEVEN 





PAGE TWELVE 




PAGE THIRTEEN 



iiti^ t ^^^ 





■ 



PAGE FOURTEEN 




PAGE FIFTEEN 




PAGE SIXTEEN 





PAGE SEVENTEEN 




PAGE EIGHTEEN 




PAGE NINETEEN 







PAGE TWENTY 



- 188 I 




PAGE TWENTY-ONE 





PAGE TWENTY-TWO 




CLIFTON DAGGETT GRAY, Ph.D., LL.D. 

"I am sure he will have a message for you" 
His Adv. : "The voice of authority" 

Born at Somerville, Mass., July 27, 1874; A.B., Harvard 
1897; A.M., 1898; Newton Theological School, D.D., 1899 
S.T.B. from University of Chicago, 1900; Ph.D., 1901; LL.D. 
University of Maine, 1922 ; Research Work in British Museum 
1900; Pastor of Free Baptist Church, Port Huron, Michigan 
1901-05; of the Stoughton Street Church, Boston, 1905-12; 
Editor of The Standard, Chicago, 1912-19; President of Bates 
College since 1920; Phi Beta Kappa; Trustee of Newton Theo- 
logical Institution ; University Club, Boston ; Harvard Club, New 
York. 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 








HAZEL M. CLARK, A.M. 

Born at Warsaw, N. Y. ; Warsaw High School, 1911; A.B., 
University of Rochester, 1915 ; Columbia University Summer 
School, 1920; A.M., Columbia University, 1926; Teacher of 
Latin and History in High Schools of New York State; Bing- 
hamton Central High School, 1921-25 ; Assistant in Department 
of Deans of Women, Columbia University Summer Session, 1926 ; 
Dean of Women and Instructor in Education, Frostburg State 
Normal School, Frostburg, Md., 1926-28; Dean of Women at 
Bates College since 1928 ; Phi Beta Kappa ; Kappa Delta Pi. 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



HERBERT RONELLE PURINTON. A.M.. D.D. 

"Pussy" 

His Adv.: "99 44/100 Pc. Pure" 

Born at Bowdoin, Maine, October 15, 1867; Graduated from 
Colby, 1891; Student at Newton Theological Seminary, 1891-92; 
Cobb Divinity School, 1894-96: Graduate Study at University of 
Chicago, 1896; Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament Interpre- 
tation, Cobb Divinity School, 1896-1908; D.D., Hillsdale College, 
1907; Professor of Biblical Literature and Religion at Bates Col- 
lege since 1908; Preacher, Teacher, Lecturer; Traveled in Pales- 
tine, 1924; Author, "Literature of the Old Testament"; "Literature 
of the New Testament"; "Achievement of the Master" (in collab- 
oration with Sadie Brackett Costello). 




GROSVENOR MAY ROBINSON. A.M. 
"Prof Rob" 

"Now watching conditions, count with tone" 

His Adv.: "Creator of the mode" 

Born at Boston, Mass., December 13, 1867; Graduated from 
School of Expression, Teacher's Course, 1890: Artistic Course, 
1891; Taught at School of Expression, Newton Theological School, 
Yale Divinity School, 1894-1907; Professor of Public Speaking 
since 1907; Trustee of Boston School of Expression since 1921; 
Traveled Abroad, Summers of 1924-1929. 




ARTHUR NEWTON LEONARD. A.M.. Ph.D. 

"Dutchy" 

His Adv.: "In the spotlight of public favor" 

Born at Brooklyn, N. Y., September 27, 1870; Brown University, 
1892; Phi Beta Kappa; Appointed to G. A. R. Fellowship, 1893-94; 
A.M., 1893; Ph.D., 1894: Instructor at Brown University, 1892-94; 
Studied in Germany, 1894-95; Professor of German at John B. 
Stetson University, Florida, 1895-96; Fairmount College, Kansas, 
1896-99; Instructor of French, Bates College, 1890-1901; Studied 
in Germany. 1907-08; and Second Semester, 1926; Co-Author of 
Ham and Leonard's Brief German Grammar; Editor of Riehl's Der 
Fluch der Schonheit. and of Baumbach's Die Nonna: Professor 
of German, Bates College since 1901. 




FRED AUSTIN KNAPP, A.M. 

"Fweddie" 

"Nihil mortalibus ardui est" 

His Adv.: "Constantly better" 

Born at Haverhill, Mass., December 9, 1872: Instructor in 
Latin and Mathematics at Nichols Latin School, and Assistant in 
Chemistry and Physics at Bates College, 1896-97; Instructor in 
English and Latin. Bates College, 1898-1901; Graduate work at 
Harvard, 1901-03; Professor of Latin at Bates since 1903; on Leave 
of Absence, 1910-11; Phi Beta Kappa. 




PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 








FRED ELMER POMEROY, A.M., Sc.D. 

"Pom" 

"I guess it's been long enough since breakfast so we can stand it." 

His Adv.: "Nobody's Immune" 

Born at Lewiston, Maine, March 6, 1877; Lewiston High School; 
Bates College, 1899; Assistant in Chemistry, 1899-1900; Instructor 
in Botany, 1900-01; Graduate Work at Harvard, 1901-02; Professor 
of Biologv at Bates since 1902; Graduate Work at Harvard and 
M. I. T., 1913-14; Phi Beta Kappa; Dean of Men, 1922-26; Study 
at Columbia, 1926-27; Professor of Biology at Bates, 1927-29. 




HALBERT HAINES BRITAN, A.M., Ph.D. 

"Doc" 

"Waal what's the psychology of this?" 

His Adv.: "Free your mind" 

Born at Bethlehem, Ind., October 8, 1874; Hanover College, 
Indiana, 1898; Taught in Kentucky, 1898-99; Graduate Work at 
Yale, 1900; Scholarship at Yale, 1900; Philosophical Review, 
Psychological Review, Inter-National Journal of Ethics, Contri- 
butions; Fellowship at Yale, 1900-02; Studied at Yale and taught 
at New Haven, 1902-03; Principal of Reynolds Academy, 1904-05; 
Instructor of Philosophy at Bates, 1905-07; On Leave of Absence 
Second Semester, 1926; Author of "Philosophy of Music"; Trans- 
lator of Descarte's "Principles of Philosophy" by Spinoza; Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy at Bates since 1907. 




GEORGE MILLET CHASE, A.M. 



"Goosie" 

"That's a very good question Mr. — 

answer it?" 



now won't you please 



His Adv. 



'The world's easiest driver" 



Born at Lewiston, Maine, 1873; Lewiston High School, 1899; 
Bates College, 1893; Cobb Divinity School, 1897-98; Yale, 1898- 
1901; Instructor at Yale, 1900-1901; Professor of Classics, Ameri- 
can International College, Springfield, 1901-1906; Professor of 
Greek Language and Literature at Bates College since 1906; 
Traveled and studied in Greece, 1923; Author of "George Colby 
Chase", The Story of a Consistent Life; Phi Beta Kappa. 




JfSN 



^J^L. 



WILLIAM RISBY WH1TEHORNE, A.M. Ph.D. 

"Willie" 

"That's a wonderful little piece of apparatus" 

His Adv.: "Hasn't scratched yet" 

Born at Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies, February 9, 1873; 
Somerville High School, Mass.; A.B., Tufts College, 1895; Univer- 
sity School, Providence, R. I.; Muhlenburg College, Penna. ; Lehigh 
University, South Bethlehem, Penna.; Pratt Institute, Brooklyn; 
Delta Tail Delta; Phi Beta Kappa; American Physical Society; 
Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science; Professor of Physics at Bates since 1907. 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 




GEORGE EDWIN RAMSDELL, A.M. 

"Uncle George" 

His Adv.: "Science finds a way" 

Born at Turner, Maine, April, 1875; Bates College. 1903; Taught 
at Maine Central Institute, 1904-05; Graduate Work at Harvard, 
A.M., 1906-07; Professor of Mathematics at Bates since 1907; 
Phi Beta Kappa. 




FRANK DEAN TUBBS, A.M.. S.T.D. 

"Doc" 

His Adv.: "Make yourself worth more" 

Born at Mexico, N. Y., April 9, 1864; Educated in Mexico Acad- 
emy, Syracuse University, Ohio Wesleyan University, A.B., 1888; 
A.M., 1893; S.T.D. , 1898; Assistant in Physics and Chemistry, Ohio 
Wesleyan; Taught in Puebla, Mexico; Mercedes, Argentina; Salino, 
Kansas; Marion, Ohio; Fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science; American Geographical Society; 
American Meteorological Society; American Historical Society; 
Phi Beta Kappa; Professor of Geology and Astronomy at Bates 
since 1907; On Leave of Absence First Semester 1928-29. 




R. R. N. GOULD. A.M. 

"Pa" 

"Now I thought there was something else." 

His Adv.: "Study at home" 

University of Michigan, 1901; Principal of Elementary Schools. 
Bay City and Saginaw, Mich.; Principal of Kalamazoo High 
School, Mich.; A.M., Columbia, 1911; Professor of History and 
Government at Bates since 1911; Faculty Advisor of Politics Club: 
Treasurer of Bates College Publishing Association; Director of 
Bates Summer School, 1922-26. 




JOHN MURRAY CARROLL, A.M. 

"Greasy" 

"We won't dwell on that further" 

His Adv.: "Built for sleep" 

Born at Washington, Maine, January 11, 1882; Kents Hill Sem- 
inary, 1904; Bates College, 1909; Assistant in Argumentation at 
Bates, 1908-09; Instructor in English Composition and Argumen- 
tation, Bates, 1909-12; Graduate Work at Harvard. A.M., 1914; 
Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sigma Rho; Faculty Member of the Bates 
Politics Club; Treasurer of Bates Debating Council. 




PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 




tt*t*01*' 




ROBERT A. F. MCDONALD. A.M.. Ph.D. 



"Mr. 



"Mac" 
perhaps you could suggest" 



His Adv.: "Boys and girls from infancy to college age" 

Born at Winnipeg, Canado, October 4, 1878; McMaster Univer- 
sity, Toronto, A.B., 1004; A.M., 1908; Specialist Certificate, 
Ontario Normal College, Hamilton, 1905; Teacher of Latin and 
Greek, Woodstock College, Woodstock, Ontario, 1905-13; Associ- 
ate Examiner, Ontario Department of Education, Toronto, 1907-09; 
Graduate Student in Education and Sociology, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1913-15; Ph.D., 1915; Member American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, Phi Delta Kappa, National Society for 
the Study of Education, National Education Association; Profes- 
sor of Education at Bates since 1915; Director of Bates Summer 
Session, 1919-22. 




WALTER ALBERT LAWRENCE, A.M., Ph.D.. F.C.S. 

"Doc" 

"Waal — guess you'd better run 'nother sample" 

His Adv.: "The boy who found rainbows in coal tar" 

Born at Watford Herts, England; A.B., A.M., McMaster Univer- 
sity, Toronto: A.M., Ph.D., 1921, University of Toronto; Scientific 
Warfare Service, 1916-17; Dominion Research Fellow, 1918-19; 
Assistant Professor McMaster University; Member American 
Chemical Society, Chemical Society Great Britain, Canadian Insti- 
tute of Chemistry, Society of Chemical Industry; Author of 
Several Original Researches in Organic and Industrial Chemistry; 
Professor of Chemistry at Bates since 1921. 




SAMUEL FREDERICK HARMS. A.M. 

"Sammy" 

His Adv.: "Light — strong — flexible" 

Born at Norwood, Minnesota; University of Minnesota, A.B., 
1909; Harvard, A.M., 1910; University of Michigan Summer School, 
1911; Instructor in German at Bates, 1910-1914; Studied in Ger- 
many, Summer of 1914; Instructor in German at University of 
Minnesota, 1914-1915; Assistant Professor of German at Bates, 
1916-1920; Studied in Spain, 1921-1922; Professor of Spanish at 
Bates since 1922; Director of Bates Summer Session since 1926. 




OLIVER FROST CUTTS, A.B., LL.B. 
"Ollie" 
"I'm afraid I'll have to set on you Mr. — 



His Adv. 



"Suds in a flash' 



Born at North Anson, Maine, August 6, 1873; A.B., Bates Col- 
lege, 1896; Teacher of Mathematics. Haverford College Grammar 
School. 1896-1900; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 1903; Coach and 
Athletic Director, Perdue University, 1903-05; Football Coach, 
University of Washington. 1905; Practiced Law, Seattle. 1906-11; 
International Committee, Y. M. C. A., 1911-14; Head of Buhl Club 
and Secretary Civic Association, Sharon, Penna., 1914; Head of 
Department of Physical Education, Perdue University, 1915-19; 
in Business, Philadelphia. 1919-22; Professor Hygiene and Physi- 
cal Education at Bates since 1922. 



PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT 



EDWIN MINER WRIGHT. A.M., Ph.D. 

"Eddie" 
"Now glancing at my notes I find 



His Adv.: "Decorative — dependable" 

Born at Weedsport, New York, April 18, 1887: Colgate Univer- 
sity, A.B.; Harvard University, A.M., Ph.D.: Teacher of East 
High School, Rochester, N. Y.: University of Rochester; Harvard 
University; Fraternities, Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Upsilon; Profes- 
sor of English Literature and Head of English Department at 
Bates since 1926. 




LENA WALMSLEY, A.M. 

Her Adv.: "Keep that schoolgirl complexion!" 

Born at Fall River, Mass.; B.M.C., Durfee High School, 1915; 
Bridgewater Normal, 1918; Taught at Quincy, Mass., 7th Grade. 
2 years; Boston, Posse Nissen School of Physical Education; 
Quincy High School, 4 years; Studied at Columbia, 2 years; A.M., 
1927. 




BLANCHE ETTA TOWNSEND, A.B. 



Her Adv.: "Spea 

Born at Lynn, Mass.; Far 
Mass. Normal School; A.B., 
University, Radcliffe College, 
Geneva, Sorbonne, University 
tion, Diplomee of Alliance 
School, Cambridge, Mass., for 
Professor in French, Bates, 
Department. 1926-27: Studie 
French Department, 1928- ; 
de Paris. 



k French like a native" 

mington, N. H. High School; Salem, 

Bates: Special Student at Boston 

Middlebury College, University of 

of Paris, Harvard School of Educa- 

Francaise; Instructor, Latin High 

ten years; Instructor and Assistant 

1924-26; Acting Head of French 

d at Sorbonne, 1927-28; Head of 

Diplomee de la Sorbonne Universite 



WILLIAM HAYES SAWYER, Jr.. A.M. 

"Bill" 

"Do you see what I mean; have I made myself clear?" 

His Adv.: "For greater- public service" 

Born at Limington, Maine, 1892; Limington Academy; Bates, 
1913; Assistant in Biology, Bates, 1913-14; Instructor in Biology, 
Bates, 1914-15; A.M., Cornell, 1916; American Microscopical 
Society; American Association for the Advancement of Science; 
Botanical Society of America; Sigma Xi; Instructor in Biology, 
Bates, since 1916; U. S. Army, A. E. F., 1918-19: Phi Beta Kappa; 
Assistant Professor in Biology at Bates since 1922. 




PAGE TWENTY-NINE 





KARL STANLEY WOODCOCK, M.S. 

"Karl" 

His Adv.: "Tinkering neatly done" 

Born at Thomaston, Maine. May 11, 1895; Thomaston High 
School, 11)14; Bates, B.S., 1918; Phi Beta Kappa; M. I. T., Summer, 
1918; Instructor of Physics and Mathematics at Bates, 1918-23; 
University of Chicago, M.S., 1922; Assistant Professor- of Physics 
at Bates since 1923. 



ANDERS MATTSON MYHRMAN. A.M. 

"Andy" 

His Adv.: "Always Present" 

Born at Purmo, Finland; Adelphia Academy, Seattle, Washing- 
ton; University of Washington, and University of Minnesota, 
A.B., 1920; Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Lambda Psi ; University of 
Chicago and University of Pennsylvania, A.M., 1924; Instructor 
in Adelphia Academy, High School, Felch. Mich., and High 
School, Altoona, Penna. ; Assistant Professor- in the Department 
of Economics and Sociology, Bates, since 1925. 




AMOS ARNOLD HOVEY, A.M., B.D. 

"Then took place one of the most horrible spectacles " 

His Adv.: "Compare its value" 

at Ludlow, N. B., Canada, 1883; A.B., Acadia University, 

14; Colgate University, 1918, B.D.; Studied Sociology in 

rk City; Professor of Social Sciences, Fargo College, N. D., 

Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of North 

Summer-, 1921; Associate Professor of History, Kalamazoo 

Mich., 1921-22: Graduate Student University of Chicago, 

A.M., 1923; Assistant Professor of History at Bates, 




CHARLES EARL PACKARD, M.S. 

"Betty" 

His Adv.: "Milder than what?" 

Born at Newbury, Maine, 1895; Bates College, A.B., 1919; M.S., 
Yale University, 1924; Taught in Thomaston High School, Pennell 
Institute, University of Illinois, Allegheny College; Member Phi 
Beta Kappa and Arcia Fraternity of Yale University; Assistant 
Professor of Biology at Bates since 1926. 



PAGE THIRTY 




FRANK BROOKS QUIMBY, A.B. 

"Now what's the other side goi'nta say — well fustly — " 

His Adv.: "Utmost simplicity" 

Born at Turner, Maine, February 18, 1897; Leavitt Institute: 
Bates College, A.B., 1918; First Lieutenant, F. A.; Graduate Work 
at Harvard University; Taug-ht, Hartford, Conn., High School; 
Dean Academy; Head of History Dept., Deering High School, 
Portland, 1922-27; Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Sigma Rho; Assistant 
Professor Argumentation and Public Speaking; Bates College 
Debating Coach since 1927. 



PERCY DESMOND WILKINS, M.S. 

"Perc" 

"Now everything's all square and above-board" 

His Adv.: "Positive Agitation" 

Born at Hardwick. Vt., March 12. 1900; Graduated from Fox- 
croft Academy, Foxeroft, Maine, 1917; A.B., Bowdoin College, 
1921; Instructor in Mathematics, Tufts College, 1921-1925; Student 
at Harvard Graduate School. 1924-25: Student at Case School of 
Applied Science, 1925-27; Instructor in Mathematics at Case 
School of Applied Science, 1925-27; M.S., Case School, 1927; Assist- 
ant Professor of Mathematics at Bates College since 1927; Member 
of American Mathematical Association and the Zeta Fsi Fra- 
ternity. ' J! 2 : 




RICHARD FRANCIS MEZZOTERO. A.M. 

"Mezzy" 

His Adv.: "Eyes surrender(ed) to its tasteful style" 

Born at Ciro, Italy; The Wooster Academy, 1917; A.B., The 
College of Wooster, 1922; A.M., Pennsylvania State College, 1925: 
With the American Expeditionary Forces in France, 1918-19; 
Alsace, Meuse-Argonne Sectors; Instructor in Romance Lan- 
guages, Pennsylvania State College, 1922-24: Summer Session, 
1924; Instructor in Romance Languages. Allegheny College, 1925- 
27; Summer Session, 1927; Extension Work Teaching Italian on 
board S. S. Colombo; Assistant Professor in Romance Languages 
and Acting Chairman of French Department at Bates College. 
1927-28; Life Member of the Modern Language Association of 
America: Member American Association of Teachers of Italian; 
Association of University Professors; Chi Lambda Zeta; Pi Kappa 
Phi: Phi Sigma Iota. 




ROBERT GEORGE BERKELMAN, A.M. 

"Bobby" 

"A student's notebook is a photograph of his mind" 

His Adv.: "Now more than ever for economy" 

Born at Duluth, Minn., June 29, 1900; Duluth Central High 
School; Lawrence College, Appleton, Wis., 1923; Phi Beta Kappa: 
Instructor at Appleton High School; Instructor English, Bates 
1924-26; A.M., Yale University, 1927; Graduate Study at Columbia 
summer, 1927; Instructor in English, Bates, 1927-28; Assistant 
Professor in English, Bates, 1928- 




page THIRTY-ONE 





CARLETON LOW WIGGIN, B.S. 

"Wig" 

Hurry! Hurry! Hurry! Go! Go! Go! 

His Adv.: "There is no standing' still" 

Born at Dover, N. H., Julv 29, 1897; Rochester High School; 
Sanford High School, 1915; B.S., Bates, 1921; Sub-Master and 
Coach of Athletics, Portsmouth, N. H., High School, 1921-22; 
Instructor in Psychology; Director of Hygiene and Physical Edu- 
cation for Men and Coach of Football, Baseball and Hockey, 
Bates, since 1922. 




CLINTON RAY THOMPSON, A.B. 

"Ray" 

His Adv.: "Acclaimed the most beautiful" 

Born at Lewiston, Maine, 1895; Lewiston High School; A.B., 
Bates, 1913; Graduate Student, Columbia University; Instructor 
in English and Coach of Athletics, Tilton School, Tilton, N. H.; 
Coach of Athletics, Moses Brown School, Providence, R. I.; Cony 
High School, Augusta, Maine, 1915-25; Instructor in Histojy and 
Freshman Athletic Coach, Winter Sports Coach, Bates, 1925-28; 
Director of Track Athletics and Winter Sport Coach, Bates, 1928- . 




REGINALD HORTON THRELFALL, B.S. 

"Reggie" 

His Adv.: "Keeps you fit" 

Born at Newton Highlands, Mass., June 2, 1903; Waltham High 
School; Purdue University. 1927; University of Illinois, 1927; 
Instructor in Physical Education for Men, Assistant Coach in 
Football, 1927- . 




CONSTANCE VANESSA JAMES 

"Connie" 

Her Adv.: "No dull evenings — no dull Sundays" 

Born at Welcome, Minn.; Graduate of All Saints Boarding 
School, Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Instructor, Dancing and 
French, at All Saints School, 1923-24; Studied Physical Education 
and Natural Dancing at University of Minnesota, 1924-25; Director 
of Dancing at New York Association for the Blind, 1926-27; Head 
of Land Sports and Director of Dancing at Camp Pinecliffe, Har- 
rison, Maine, 1927; Graduate of Central School of Hygiene and 
Physical Education, New York City, 1927. Instructor of Hygiene 
and Physical Education for Women, Bates, 1927- . 



PAGE THIRTY-TWO 



SELDON TUPPER CRAFTS 

His Adv.: "has won preference everywhere" 

Born at Amherst, Nova Scotia, November 3, 187fi; Studied with 
E. W. Hanscom, Auburn, Frank L. Rankin, Portland, Everett 
Truette and George Lowell Tracy, Boston; Organist State Street 
Church, Portland; Conductor of Portland and Lewiston Festival 
Choruses for Many Years; Teacher of Piano and Organ; Director 
of Music at Bates since 1925. 



HAROLD FRITZ SIPPRELL, A.M. 

"Sippy" 

His Adv.: "Do you know the English language of today?" 

Born, April, 1900; A.B., Acadia University, 1927; A.M., Harvard. 
1928; University Scholar at Harvard, 1927-2S; Assistant in English 
at Acadia University; Instructor in English at Bates, 1928- 




AUGUST BUSCHMANN, A.M. 
His Adv.: "Looking upward (and forward)" 

Dartmouth, 1927, A.B.; Phi Beta Kappa; Alpha Sigma Phi: 
Harvard, 1928, A.M.; Instructor in German, Bates, 1928- . 



1 



ROSCOE HALL SAWYER, A.M. 

His Adv.: "Aids the Laboratories of Science" 

Born at Gray, Maine, August 5, 1903; Pennell Institute, 1921; 
Member Alpha Chi Sigma; Harvard Engineering School, 1921-25; 
B.S., Harvard Engineering School, 1925; Harvard Graduate School, 
1925-28; A.M., Harvard, 1927; Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard 
University, 1925-27; Instructor in Chemistry, Harvard University, 
1927-28; Instructor in Chemistry, Bates College, 1928- . 




PAGE THIRTY-THREE 





PAUL WHITBECK, A.M. 
His Adv.: "Learn to write" 

Born at Altamont N. Y., February 6, 1899; A.B., Hamilton 
College, 1921; A.M.. Columbia University, 1928; Member Alpha 
Delta Phi; Instructor in English, Bates, 1928- . 




FRANK WESLEY LANE, A.M. 

His Adv.: "Incredibly Quiet" 

Born at Kents Hill, Maine, 1904; B.S., Wesleyan, 1921; A.M., 
Wesleyan, 1928; Chemistry Laboratory Instructor at Wesleyan, 
1926-28; Instructor in Chemistry, Bates, 1928- . 




HARRY WILLISON ROWE, A.B. 



His Adv. 



"Harry" 
'Instrument of the Immortal(s)" 



Born at Mercer. Maine, November 13, 1887; Maine Central Insti- 
tute, 1906; Principal, Troy High School. 1906-08; Pastor Free 
Baptist Church, Lisbon Falls, 1908-11; Bates, A.B., 1912; Field 
Secretary Maine Christian Endeavor Union, 1912-14; Field Secre- 
tary Northern N. E., 1914; Member of the Executive Committee, 
Main C. E. Union, 1912-20; Bursar, Bates College, 1920-28; Alumni 
Secretary, 1920- . Assistant to the President, 1924- . Secre- 
tary Alumni Association, Bates College, 1925- ; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Delta, Sigma Rho; University Club, Boston; Rotary. 




MABEL LOIS L1BBY, A.B. 
Her Adv.: "What a whale of a difference a few (hours make)" 

Born at Swampscott, Mass., March 14, 1896; Edward Little 
High School, 1914; Bates College, 1918; High School Assistant, 
Bradford Academy, Bradford, Vermont, 1918-20; High School 
Assistant, Stephens High School, Rumford, Maine, 1920-21; Maine 
School of Commerce, 1922; Assistant to Registrar and Secretary 

to Dean of Women, Bates College, 1922-26; Acting Registrar, 

1926-28; Registrar, 1928- . 



PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 



BLANCHE WHITTUM ROBERTS, A.B. 

"I'll see if it's listed" 

Her Adv.: "Guaranteed to please you!" 

Born at Lewiston, Maine, January 2, 1879; Lewiston High 
School 1895; Bates, 1899; Assistant at Kittery, 1898-99; Student 
at Amherst Summer School, 1904; Forbes Summer Library School, 
1906; Assistant Librarian, Coram Library, Bates, 1903-09; Student 
at Simmons Summer Library School, 1909; Librarian Coram 
Library, Bates, since 1909. Instructor in Library Science at 
Bates Summer School. 



MABEL EATON. A.B., B.S. 

Her Adv.: "Value beyond dispute" 

Born at Oakland, Maine, September 16, 1887; Edward Little 
High School; Bates, 1910; B.S., Simmons, 1912; Cataloguer at Uni- 
versity of Chicago Library, 1912-13; Williams College Library, 
1913-14; Assistant Librarian, Auburn Public Library, 1914-19; 
Teacher of French and English, Auburn, 1919-20; Assistant, 
Coram Library at Bates since 1921; Social Director Bates Summer 
School 1929. 




DORA ETTA ROBERTS, A.B. 

"Ma" 

Her Adv.: "Thrill them at meal time" 

Born at Milton, N. H.; Bates, 1895; Taught in Secondary 
Schools, 1895-1905; Massachusetts General Hospital, 1905-14; Sim- 
mons, Institutional Management Course, 1915; Home for Aged 
Women, Boston, 1915-23i Director of Residences for Women at 
Bates, 1923-28. Dietitian, 1928. 




NORMAN ERNEST ROSS, B.S. 

"Norm" 

His Adv.: "We help ferret out hidden costs" 

Born at Kennebunkport, Maine, 1898; Biddeford High School, 
1917; Bates, 1922; Instructor in Science and Coach of Athletics, 
Brandon, Vt, 1922-24; Assistant Bursar at Bates, 1924-28. Bursar, 
1928- . 




PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 





FRED TROWBRIDGE GOOGINS, A.B. 

"Fred" 

His Adv.: "Unified control over widespread activities" 

Deering High School, 1923; Bates, 1927; Delta Sigma Rho; 
Columbia, 1927-28; Director of Publicity; Secretary, Y. M. C. A., 
Bates, 1928- . 



ELSIE AGNES BADGER. R.N. 

Her Adv.: "Here by your bedside, warm and glowing" 

Born at Phillips, Maine; Phillips High School; Practical Nurs- 
ing, three years: Central Maine General Hospital, R.N., 1921; 
Nurse at Bates College since 1924. 




RACHEL ALICE METCALFE. R.N. 
Her Adv.: "Wins life long favor" 

Porn at Manchester, England; trained at Worcester City Hos- 
pital, Worcester, Mass.; Superintendent of Nurses at Worcester 
City Hospital, 1892-1903; Superintendent of Training School, 
Orange Memorial Hospital, Orange, N. J., 1904-1906; Summer Camp 
Hospital, 'Worcester, 1906; Superintendent of Hospital and Train- 
ing School at Central Maine General, 1906-1927; Leave of Absence, 
1927: Director of Residences, Bates, 1928- . 



PAGE THIRTY-SIX 





PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 





Class (Miters of Class of 1929 

1929 

President, William Howard Bull 

Vice-President, Mary PendlEbury 

Secretary, Lucy Marie LundELL 

Treasurer, Gilbert Lawrence Gates 

1928 

President, Philip Elzear Tetreau 

Vice-President, Mary PendlEbury 

Secretary, Frances Elizabeth Maguire 

Treasurer, Frank Forrest Colburn, Jr. 

1927 

President, Edgar Avery Wood 

Vice-President, Frances Lucille Cobb 

Secretary, Elizabeth Anna Crafts 

Treasurer, Wendell William TetlEy 

1926 

President, Francis Herbert Wise 

Vice-President, Miriam Elizabeth Alexander 
Secretary, Frances Lucille Cobb 

Treasurer, Stanley Irving Perham 



PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 




LOUISE MAY ABBOTT, A.B. 

"Lou" 

West Scarboro, Maine 

Born December 31, 1907; Thornton Academy; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 3, 4; Alethea 2, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer 3; Hiking 1, 2; Sodalitas Latina 4; 
Gym Fund Committee 4 ; Commencement Hop Com- 
mittee. 



ROYAL SPAULDING ADAMS. B.S. 

"Roy", "Ad" 

Houlton, Maine 

Born September 19, 1905; Houlton High School, 
1923; Football 1, 2; Track 1, 2. 3, 4, Captain 4; Cross- 
country 3, 4 ; Student Council 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 
3, President 4; Athletic Council 3, 4, Student Presi- 
dent 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Jordan Scientific Society 
3, 4; Commons Committee 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Board of Directors, Outing Club 4. 



GARDNER BLAISDELL ALEXANDER, B.S. 

"Alec", "Blazer" 

Laconia, New Hampshire 

Born November 4, 1906 ; Laconia High School, 
1925; Freshman Prize Speaking 1; Band 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Manager 3 ; Assistant Manager Tennis 2. 3, Manager 
4; Assistant Business Manager Bates Student 2, Man- 
ager 3, 4 ; Assistant Business Manager Mirror 4 ; 
Varsitv Club. 



SHIRLEY ELIZABETH ALLBEE, A.B. 

"Shirl" 

Lexington, Maine 

Born April 14, 1907 ; Anson Academy ; Entre Nous 
1 ; Y. W. C. A. Committee 3; Hiking 3, 4; Numerals 
2 ; "B" Club 4 ; House Council 3 ; Ivy Day Speaker 3 ; 
Politics Club 4. 



PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



r ^H<ria*; 









S34 




FRANCES AGNES BARTKUS. A.B. 

Levviston, Maine 

Born July 1. 1908; Jordan High School; Entre 
Nous ; Y. W. C. A. ; La Petite Academic 4 ; Lamhda 
Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 3, Secretary- 
Treasurer 4: Assistant in Spanish 3, 4. 



MARTHA TRUE BASSETT, A.B. 

"Mart" 

Penacook, New Hampshire 

Born November 9, 1906; Penacook High Schooi ; 
Entre Nous 1; Cosmos Club 3, Secretary 4; Deutscher 
Verein 4; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Winter Sports 2, 3; "B" 
Club 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. Committee 3, 4. < 



JULIAN STEWART BIGELOW, A.B. 
"Big- 
Portland, Maine 

Born October 18, 1902; Portland High School, 1922; 
English 4A Players 3, 4, Executive Committee 4; Spof- 
ford Club 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Outing Club 3, 4; 
Y. M. C. A. 3, 4; Y. W. Play 4; Greek Play; Class 
Day Speaker. 



EDWARD GEORGE BILODEAU, B.S. 

Augusta, Maine 

Born May 18, 1907; Skowhegan High School, 1925; 
Lawrance Chemical Societv 4, Vice-President 4: Y. 
M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PAGE FORTY 



GWENDOLYN MARY BLAGDEN. A.B. 

"Gwen" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born Februarv 22, 1904; Edward Little High 
School; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 3, 4: 
Sodalitas Latina 4; Phil-Hellenic Club 4. 



HAZEL BARRETT BLANCHARD. A.B. 

"Haze" 

Stoneham, Massachusetts 

Born September 26, 1907 ; Stoneham High School ; 
Entre Nous 1; Freshman Prize Speaking; Bobcat 
Board 1; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1, 3; Hockey 1, 3, 4; 
Volley Ball 2, 3; Winter Sports 3; "B" Club 4; 
Student Government Board 2 ; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, Com- 
mittee 4; Lambda Alpha 2; Junior Exhibition (Prize) ; 
Ramsdell Scientific 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Assist- 
ant in Sociology 3, 4 ; Phi Beta Kappa. 



STELLA BORNSTEIN, A.B. 

Auburn, Maine 

Born April 17, 1908; Edward Little High School: 
Entre Nous; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Volley Ball 2: 
Y. W. C. A.; La Petite Academie 4. 



MARY BURNHAM BRIGGS, A.B. 

Mechanic Falls, Maine 

Born May 3, 1908; Mechanic Falls High School: 
Entre Nous 1; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 2, 3; Baseball 2; 
Deutscher Verein 4; Phi Beta Kappa. 





PAGE FORTY-ONE 



■•^(^'♦■♦■■■'ifer' 







a— am a— a 




SHIRLEY ELEANOR BROWN. A.B. 

New Sharon, Maine 

Born January 19, 1908; New Sharon High School; 
Farmington Normal ; Y. W. C. A. ; Track 2, 3 ; Hockev 
4; Winter Sports 2, 3; Numerals 2; "B" Club 3. 4; 
W. A. A. Board 4 ; La Petite Acaremic 4 ; Sodalitas 
Latina 4; Ramsdell Scientific 4; Commencement Hop 
Committee. 



WILLIAM HOWARD BULL, A.B. 

"Bill", "John", "Howie" 

Worcester, Massachusetts 

Born July 13, 1905; Upton High School, 1922; 
Entered Bates in the Class of 1927 ; Bates Student 2, 
3 ; Circulation Manager Bobcat 2 ; Varsity Play 2. 4 ; 
English 4A Players 2, 3, 4, Business Manager 4, Execu- 
tive Committee 3, 4; La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4; La 
Petite Academic Plays 2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Board of Directors 3, 4, Vice-President of Cabins and 
Trails 3 ; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 3, Cab- 
inet 4; Phi Sigma Iota 4; Glee Club 4; Curriculum 
Committee 3, 4 ; Chairman Student Social Functions 
Committee 3, 4; Student Council 3, 4; Junior Exhibi- 
tion; Ivy Day Oration; Chairman of Commons Com- 
mittee 4 ; President of Class 4 ; Cross-Country 3 ; 
Track 3, 4 ; Mirror Board ; Athletic Council 4 ; Greek 
Plav. 



BELVA CARLENE CARLL, A.B. 

"B" 

Waterboro, Maine 

Born December 24, 1907; Waterboro High School; 
Entre Nous 1; Hiking 2. 3; Hockev 1, 2, 3, 4; Volley 
Ball 1; Winter Sports 1, 3, Captain 2; Basketball 4; 
Gym Meet 1, 2, 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Track 3, 4, Cap- 
tain 1, 2; Baseball 2, 3, 4 ; Manager of Track 4; Man- 
ager of Baseball 4;_ Numerals 1; "B" Club 2, 3, 4; 
Medal 3; Cup 4 ; W. A. A. Board 4; House Council 3. 



FOREST WALKER CARPENTER, A.B. 

"Carp" 

Limerick, Maine 

Born Mav 20, 1907; Sanford High School, 1925; 
Politics Club 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 
4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PAGE FORTY -TWO 




PAUL CHESLEY, A.B. 

"Paul" 

East Sumner, Maine 

Born July 10, 1906; Buckfield High School, 1923; 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Cross-Country 2, 3, Captain 4; Student 
Council 1, 2, Vice-President 4; Athletic Council 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Board of Directors 2, 3, Presi- 
dent 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Y. M. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 2, 4; Freshman Prize Speaking; 
Sophomore Prize Speaking ; Junior Exhibition ; Fresh- 
man Prize Debate ; Sophomore Prize Debate ; Student 
Board 2, 3, 4; Ivy Day Speaker; Assistant in Biology 
3, 4 ; Student Curriculum Committee Chairman 4 ; 
English 4A Players 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LAAP-PAN CHAN, A.B. 
"Roby" 

Hong Kong, China 

Born December 25, 1907; Canton Christian Col- 
lege, 1925; Outing Club 4; Y. M. C. A. 4. 



DORIS MABEL CHICK, A.B. 

"Chick" 

Monmouth, Maine 

Born December 22, 1906; Monmouth Academy 
Y. W. C. A.; Hockey 2; Basketball 1; Captain 2 
Vollev Ball 1; Baseball 2; Soccer 1, 2; Numerals 1 
"B" Club 2, 3, 4; Politics Club 3, Secretary 4; Assist 
ant in History 3, 4. 



FRANCES LUCILLE COBB, A.B. 

"Fran" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born June 12, 1908; Saint Joseph's Academy; 
Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club; Class Secre- 
tary 1 ; Class Vice-President 2. 



PAGE FORTY-THREE 










OLA GRACE COFFIN. A.B. 

"0" 

Portage, Maine 

Bom April 28, 1906; Presque Isle High School; 
Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1, 2; Basketball 2; Numerals 2; 
Phil-Hellenic 3, 4; La Petite Academie 4; Sodalitas 
Latina 4. 



FRANK FORREST COLBURN, JR., B.S. 

"Ike" 

Bangor, Maine 

Born March 13. 1903; Bangor High School, 1923; 
Freshman Football ; Varsity Football 2, 3. 4 : Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4; Treasurer of 
Class 3; Class Marshal 2, 3; Varsity Club 4. 



ARCHIE RUSSELL COLE. A.B. 

"Archie" 

Gardiner, Maine 

Born Mav 29, 1907; Gardiner High School, 1925; 
Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Freshman Football ; Football 2. 



GEORGE THURSTON COLE, A.B. 

Rumford Point, Maine 

Born Tulv 18, 1907; Stephens High School, 1925; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Phil- 
Hellenic; Spofford Club 4; Mirror Board 3, 4. 



PAGE FORTY-FOUR 




PAUL LEANDER COLEMAN, A.B. 

"Paul" 

Brooklyn, New York 

Born December 1, 1906; Buslrwick High School, 
1925; Freshman Cross-Countrv ; Track 1, 2, 3; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Orphic Society 4; Choir 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 4; Macfarlane Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4. 



MAYNARD BROWN COLLEY, B.S. 

Gray, Maine 

Born July 26, 1905; Pcnnell Institute, 1925; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Jordan Scien- 
tific Society 4; Assistant in Biology 3, 4. 



RUTH ELENA CONANT, A.B. 

"Coc" 

North Easton, Massachusetts 

Born March 28, 1909; Oliver Ames High School 
Freshman Prize Debate ; Sophomore Prize Debate 
House Council 3; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Sports 4 
Numerals 2; "B" Club 4; Politics Club 3, President 
4; Entre Nous 1; Honor Work in Government 4; Phi 
Beta Kappa. 



CARLYSS MAY COOK, A.B. 

Sabattus, Maine 

Born December 12, 1906; Sabattus High School; 
Entre Nous; Lambda Alpha 1, 3, Secretary 2, Com- 
mittee 4 ; Hockey 2, 3 ; Baseball 2, 3 ; Soccer 2. 3 ; 
Track 1; Hiking 1, 2, 3; Numerals 2; "B" Club 3, 4; 
Medal 4; Deutscher Verein 3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 
Club 3, 4. 




PAGE FORTY-FIVE 




■ rv .. 







RAYMOND WILSEA COY, A.B. 

'•Ray" 

Welchville, Maine 

Born December 22, 1906; Oxford High School, 
1925; Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Manager of Cross-Country and Track 4; Varsity 
Club 4. 



ELIZABETH ANNA CRAFTS. A.B. 

"Betty" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born July 13, 1906; Jordan High School; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Macfarlane Club 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club 2, 3, 4; Alethea 2, 3; Lambda Alpha 1. 2. 3, 4, 
Vice-President 3; Gym Fund Committee 4; English 
4A. Players 2, 3. 4 ; Secretary of Class 2. 



HENRY CUMMINGS CULLINAN, B.S. 

"Henry", "Cully" 

Norway, Maine 

Born April 27, 1906; Norway High School. 1924; 
Kents Hill Seminary, 1925; Outing Club 1, 2. 3, 4, 
Board of Directors 2, 3; Chase Hall Committee 2, 3; 
Publishing Board 3; Jordan Scientific Society 3, 4. 



GERALD DOUGLAS CUSHING, A.B. 

"Gerry" 

West Bethel, Maine 

Born October 4, 1903 ; Central High School, Spring- 
field Massachusetts, 1921; Outing Club 2, 3, 4 ; Y. M. 
C. A. 2, 3, 4; Cosmos Club 3, 4; Assistant in Biblical 
Literature and Religion 3, 4. 



PAGE FORTY-SIX 




ELOI RAYMOND DAIGLE, B.S. 

"Eloi", "The Fighting Frenchman" 

Fort Kent, Maine 

Born August 11, 1004; Fort Kent High School, 
1925; Freshman Football; Freshman Hockey; Varsity 
Football 2. 3, 4; Varsity Hockev 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 
3. 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4. 



HELEN MARTHA DAILEY, A.B. 

Auburn, Maine 

Born October 1, 1907; Edward Little High School 
Y. W. C. A.; Entre Nous 1; Lambda Alpha'" 1. 2, 3, 4; 
La Petite Academie 4. 



RUBY EILEEN DANIELS. A.B. 

Mechanic Falls, Maine 

Born October 30, 1907; Mechanic Falls High 
School: Entre Nous; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Numerals 2; 
"B" Club 4 ; Ivy Day Committee ; Deutscher Verein 4. 



DORIS VIRGINIA DAVID, A.B. 

"Dave" 

Brooklyn, New York 

Born November 19, 1906; Erasmus Hall High 
School ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 2, Secretary 4 ; Entre 
Nous; Hockey 2, Captain 1; Volley Ball 1, 2; Soccer 
1 ; Track 2; Senior Life Saving 2; Gym Meet 1, 2, 3; 
W. A. A. Board, Hockey Manager 3 ; Tennis Manager 
4; Numerals 2; "B" Club 3; Sophomore Prize Speak- 
ing ; Alethea 2, 3 ; Orphic Society 2, 3, 4 ; Politics Club 
3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific Society 3, Secretary 4; Mac- 
farlane Club 3, Secretary 4. 



PAGE FORTY-SEVEN 








IL A\ 





PAULINE DAVIS, A.B. 

"Polly" 

Saco, Maine 

Born December 7, 1906; Thornton Academy; 
Alethea 2, 3; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1. 2, 3; Winter 
Sports 3 ; Archery 2, Captain 3 ; Numerals 2 ; "B" Club 
3, 4; Chairman of Y. W. Bazaar 4; Assistant in Edu- 
cation 3, 4. 



ARTHUR SANBORN DOW, A.B. 

"Sandy", "Blondie", "Whitie" 

Bristol, New Hampshire 

Born August 2, 1907; New Hampton Literary Insti- 
tute, 1925; Choir 1. 2. 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Outing- 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



CONSTANTINOS STELIANOU DUKAKIS, A.B. 

"Duke" 

Lowell, Massachusetts 

Born May 4, 1899; Mytilene High School, Greece; 
Lesbos College, Greece ; Boston University ; Outing 
Club 4; Y. M. C. A. 4; Phil-Hellenic 4. 



WALTER NELSON DUROST, A.B. 

"Walt" 

Portland, Maine 

Born March 6, 1906; South Portland High School, 
1925; Assistant in Biblical Literature 3, 4; Cosmos 
Club 2, 3, 4, President 3; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer 3, President 4; Choir 2, 3, 4; Glee 
Club 2; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; 
Honor Student; Class Day Part; Phi Beta Kappa. 



PAGE FORTY-EIGHT 




NORMAN LUTHER EDWARDS. B.S. 

"Beak" 

Madison, Maine 

Born October 24, 1905; Madison High School, 1924; 
Freshman Cross-Country ; Vice-President Bates Pub- 
lishing Association 4; President Roger Williams Hall 
Association 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4. 



THEODORE ERNEST FIELD, B.S. 

"Ted" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born February 19, 1908; Edward Little High 
School, 1925 ; Jordan Scientific Society 3, 4, Chairman 
Executive Committee 4; Sophomore Prize Debate; 
Varsity Debating Squad 2; Assistant in Argumenta- 
tion 4; Coe Scholarship; Honor Student in Chemistry 
4; College Economic Conference Delegate 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Brown Co. 
Scholarship at John Hopkins University ; Phi Beta 
Kappa. 



MARY SCOTT FINN, A.B. 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born October 30, 1908; Jordan High School; Y. W. 
C. A.; Entre Nous; Lambda Alpha 1, 2. 3, Commit- 
tee 4; Alethea 2, 3; Sodalitas Latina 4; Volley Ball 2, 
Captain 1 ; Baseball 3 : Archerv Tournament 2, 3 ; 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; Golf Club 2, 3; Numer- 
als 2; "B" Club 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota Fraternity. 



GILBERT LAWRENCE GATES, A.B. 
"Larry" 

Abington, Massachusetts 

Born June 23, 1908; Abington High School, 1925; 
Freshman Football : Varsitv Football 2, 3, 4 ; Varsitv 
Club 4; Politics Club 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Board of Directors 3, 4, Secretary 4; Baseball Squad 
4; Track Squad 3; Vice-President of West Parker 
Hall Association 4; Treasurer of Class 4; Mirror 
Board ; Greek Play. 



PAGE FORTY-NINE 










VELMA CHRISTINE GIBBS. A.B. 

"Vemmy" 

Merrimac, Massachusetts 

Born November 6, 1907 ; Merrimac High School ; 
Entre Nous; Alethea 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 3, 
Treasurer 4; Deutscher Verein 3, President 4; Hockey 
1, 2, 3, 4; Hiking 1, 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3; Winter Sports 
1, 2, 3, Captain 4; Gym Meet 1, 2, 3 ; Soccer 1, 2; 
Numerals 1 ; "B" Club 2, 3, 4 ; Medal 3. 



ELEANOR GILE, A.B. 

Springvale, Maine 

Born August 29, 1906; Sanford High School; Entre 
Nous: Bobcat Board 2; Sophomore English Prize; 
Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1. 2, 3. 4 ; Numerals 2; "B" Club 
4; Sodalitas Latina 4; 4A Players 3, 4; Y. W. Bazaar 
Committee 4 ; Mirror Board ; Costume Mistress, Greek 
Plav. 



LOUISE CAMPBELL GILMAN, A.B. 

Bridgton, Maine 

Born Tune 6, 1906; Bridgton High School; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Archery 2, 3; 
Volley Ball 3; Numerals 2; "B" Club 4. 



RALPH EDMUND GIROUX, B.S. 

"Jerry", "Joe" 

Lubec, Maine 

Born June 2, 1905; Lubec High School, 1924; 
Deutscher Verein 4; Jordan Scientific Society 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Board of Directors 4; Class 
Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Football 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Varsity Club 4. 



PAGE FIFTY 




LIBBY RACHEL GOLDMAN, A.B. 

Auburn, Maine 

Born April 22, 1908; Edward Little High School; 
Entre Nous; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; La Petite 
Academie 4; Sodalitas Latina 4; Ramsdell Scientific 
Society 4; Phi Sigma Iota Fraternity; Phi Beta Kappa. 



HELEN ISABELL GOODWIN, A.B. 

"Goodie" 

Bristol, New Hampshire 

Born October 13, 1909; Bristol High School; Y 
W. C. A. Cabinet 3, 4; Entre Nous; Tennis 1, 2 
Baseball Captain 2; Hiking 1, 2, 3; Gym Meet 1, 2, 3 
Numerals 2 ; "B" Club 3, 4 ; La Petite Academie 3, 4 
Sodalitas Latina 4; Phi Sigma Iota Fraternity, Secre 
tary 4 ; Honor Work in French. 



LOUIS LORENZO GRAY, A.B. 

"Louie" 

Seal Cove, Maine 

Born January 7, 1905 ; Southwest Harbor High 
School, 1924 ; Freshman Cross-Country ; Track 1 ; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cosmos 
Club 2, 3, 4; Honor Student in Philosophy 4. 



LOUIS KENNETH GREEN, B.S. 

"Ken" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born April 16, 1905; Edward Little High School, 
1924; Hebron Academy, 1925; Jordan Scientific 
Society 3, 4, President 4; Ivy Day Speaker; Golf 
Club 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 
2, 4; Class Day Speaker. 



PAGE FIFTY-ONE 





%^ "#.>5|P Jm/ 













BENJAMIN GRUBER, B.S. 

"Ben" 

Maynard, Massachusetts 

Born February 17, 1907; Mavnard High School, 
1924; Greek Prize Winner, 1925;' Phil-Hellenic 3, 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



FRED EDWIN HANSCOM, A.B. 

"Doc", "Freddie" 

Sanford, Maine 

Born July 3, 1908; Sanford High School, 1925; 
Secretary Roger Williams Hall Association 1 ; La 
Petite Academie 3, 4; French Plays 3; Politics Club 
3, 4. Vice-President 4; Bates Publishing Association 
3, 4, President 4 ; Glee Club 3, 4 ; Gym Fund Com- 
mittee 4 ; Freshman Hockev Squad ; Varsity Hockey 
Squad 3, 4: Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Greek Play. 



JOHN PAUL HASSETT. A.B. 

"Johnny" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born September 3, 1908; Jordan High School, 1925; 
La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4 ; French Club Plays 2, 3 ; 
Honor Student in French 4 ; Assistant Business Man- 
ager Bobcat 2; Curriculum Committee 4; Class Day 
Toastmaster. 



JOSEPH DANIEL HAVILAND. A.B. 

"Joe" 

New York, New York 

Born October 19, 1903, at Rio Piedro, Porto Rico; 
University High School at Rio Piedro, 1924; Y. M. 
C. A. l; 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4; Student Volunteers. 



PAGE FIFTY-TWO 




AMY CLEO HIGGINS. A.B. 

"Clee" 

Mapleton, Maine 

Born December 10, 1908; Mapleton High School; 
Entre Nous ; Y. W. C. A. ; Alethea 2, 3 ; House 
Council 3 ; Y. W. Bazaar Committee 2 ; Student 
Government Board 4; Phil-Hellenic 3, 4; Assistant 
in French 4 ; Phi Sigma Iota Fraternity. 



MERWIN DOUGLAS HODGKIN. B.S. 

Levviston, Maine 

Born September 24, 1907; Tordan High School, 
1925; Orphic Society 1. 2, 3, 4, Librarian 3; Band 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3. 4 ; Winter 
Sports 4. 



WALTER ORVILLE HODSDON, B.S. 

"Walt" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born February 13, 1906; Edward Little High 
School. 1924; President Freshman Debating Council; 
Freshman Prize Debate; Sophomore Prize Debate; 
Freshman Prize Speaking; Sophomore Prize Speak- 
ing; Varsity Debating Council 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
International Debater 3, 4; Ivy Day Speaker; Jordan 
Scientific Society 3, 4; Assistant in Chemistry 4; Delta 
Sigma Rho ; Class Gift Committee. 



HELEN BERNICE HOLMAN, A.B. 

"Daddy" 

Camden, Maine 

Born November 22, 1907; Camden High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 4; Hiking 1, 2, 
3. 4; Basketball 1; Track 3; Numerals 2; "B" Club 4; 
Freshman Prize Speaking; Cosmos 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Choir 4: 
Glee Club 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 4; Assistant in Bibli- 
cal Literature 4; Honor Work in Biblical Literature; 
Greek Play ; Class Day Speaker. 



PAGE FIFTY-THREE 






&ie 




=m 





ETHELYN ELIZABETH HOYT, A.B. 

"Eth" 

Gorham, Maine 

Born November 13. 1907; Gorham High School; 
Entre Nous; Outing Club Director 1. 2, 3, 4; Basket- 
ball 2, 4, Captain 1; Hockey 1. 3, 4; Soccer 1, 3; 
Baseball 2, 3; Vollevball 1; Gvm Meet 1, 2, 3; 
Numerals 1; "B - * Club 2, 3, 4; Medal 4; W. A. A. 
Board, Secretary 2, President 4; Manager of Volley- 
ball and Archery 3 ; Alethea 2, 3 ; La Petite Academie 
3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 4; Sodalitas Latina 4; Mirror 
Board. 



HELEN MARJORIE HUDSON, A.B. 

North Plymouth, Massachusetts 

Born September 28. 1908; Kingston High School; 
Y. W. C. A.; Outing Club; Cosmos 1, 2, 3, 4; Student 
Board 1, 2; Volley Ball 2, 3; Hiking 1, 2; Numerals 
4 ; Lambda Alpha 3. 



MYRTLE ALTA HUFF, A.B. 

Sanford, Maine 

Born March 3, 1907; Sanford High School; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Numerals 2; 
"B" Club 4; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4; Sodalitas Latina 4. 



EARL HUTCHINSON. A.B. 

"Hutch" 

Lynn, Massachusetts 

Born April 26, 1905 ; Lvnn Classical High School, 
1923; Football 4; Varsity Club 4. 



PAGE FIFTY-FOUR 




JACOB JALMAR IMMONEN, A.B. 

"Jake" 

West Paris, Maine 

Born January 13, 1908; West Paris High School, 
1924; President John Bertram Hall Association 3; 
Outing Club 2, 3, 4; Winter Sports 2, 3, 4; Varsity 
Club 4. 



EZEKIEL EMMANUEL JEWELL, B.S. 

"Zeke" 

Lisbon Falls, Maine 

Born July 18, 1904; Lisbon Falls High School, 1922; 
Track Squad 2, 3; Football 2, 3, 4 ; Outing Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Varsity Club 4; Greek Play. 



EVELYN MARGARET KENNARD. A.B. 

"Ev" 

West Baldwin, Maine 

Born August 13, 1905; Bridgton Academy; Y. W. 
C. A. Committee 1; Hockey 1, Captain 2, 3; Volley 
Ball 1; Tennis 1, Class Championship 2; Soccer 2; 
Baseball 2; Numerals 2; "B" Club 3, 4. 



PETER KESARIS, A.B. 

"Pete" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born February 27, 1907, at Arcadia, Greece; Jordan 
High School. 1925; Phil-Hellenic Club 3, 4; Outing 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 





PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 











WILLIAM CHADBOURNE KILBOURNE, B.S. 

"Bill" 

Bridgton, Maine 

Born December 25, 1005 ; Ridgewood High School, 
1924; Student Board 2, 3, News Editor 4; Sports 
Editor of Mirror 4; Orphic Societv 1, 2, 3, 4; Mac- 
farlane Club 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 
1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 4; Assistant in Department of 
Physical Education 4. 



HOWARD WALLACE KNIGHT. A.B. 

"Walt" 

Belchertown, Massachusetts 

Born Tuly 25, 1907; Littleton High School, 1925; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Assistant Manager of Hockey 3 ; Manager 4 ; Politics 
Club 3, 4, President 4; Varsity Club 4. 



FLORENCE MARY KYES, A.B. 

"Kysie" 

North Jay, Maine 

Born February 2, 1908 ; Jay High School ; Entre 
Nous; Hockev 1. 2, 3, Captain 4; Hiking 1; Volley- 
ball 1, Captain 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Gym Meet 
1. 2, 3; Baseball 3, 4; Tennis 2; Archery 3; Track 
2; 3; Soccer 2, 3, 4; "B" Club 2, 3, 4; Medal 3; 
Cup 4; Student Government Board 2, President 4; 
W. A. A. Board 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Y. W. C. A. Committee 
3, 4; Ramsdell Scientific 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Student 
Curriculum Committee 4 ; Delegate to National Student 
Government Conference 4. 



ANTHONY MAURICE LaGASSE, B.S. 

"Mark" 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 

New Bedford High School, 1925; Glee Club 3; 
Choir 3 ; Orchestra 2 ; Lawrance Chemical Society 4 ; 
Assistant in Chemistry 4. 



PAGE FIFTY-SIX 




DOROTHY LUCILLE LANE, A.B. 
"Dot" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born March 11. 1908; Edward Little High School; 
Entre Nous; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, 4; Bobcat Board 
2; Ivy Hop Committee 3; Class Gift Committee 4. 



MAURICE JOSEPH LANE. A.B. 

"Tossy", "Laney" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born Tulv 13, 1906; Tordan High School, 1924; 
Hockey 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4. 



YVONNE LOUISE LANGLOIS. A.B. 

"Eve" 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Born March 22, 1908; Presque Isle High School 
Entre Nous; Hockey 1, 2; Volleyball 1, 2; Soccer 1, 2 
Gvm Meet 1, 2, 3; Hiking 1, 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2 
Track 1; Numerals 1; "B" Club 2, 3, 4; La Petite 
Academie 2, 3 ; Y. W. Cabinet 2, 3, 4; Spofford Club 
3 ; Glee Club 3 ; Macfarlane Club 4 ; Assistant in 
French 4; Debating Council 2, 3, Women's Secretary 
4 ; Junior Exhibition ; Delta Sigma Rho ; Mirror 
Board ; Phi Beta Kappa. 



WALTER WILLIAM LARKIN, B.S. 

"Lark", "Buddy" 

Maynard, Massachusetts 

Born March 12, 1907; Maynard High School, 1924; 
Freshman Cross-Country ; Freshman Hockev; Outing- 
Club 1, 2. 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 4. 



PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN 



1 








LAWRENCE CHARLES LeBEAU, B.S. 

"Larry" 

Meredith, New Hampshire 

Born July 26, 1905; Meredith High School, 1924; 
Technical Editor Bates Student 2, 3, Editor-in-Chief 
4; Business Manager of the Mirror 4; Spofford Club 
3, 4, Vice-President 4; Jordan Scientific Society 4; 
V. M. C. A, 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Board 
of Directors 2 ; Manager Freshman Prize Speaking 1 
V. W. C. A. Play 3 ; German Club Plays 3 ; Common 
Committee 3 ; Honor Work 4 ; Assistant in Physics 3 
Phi Beta Kappa. 



GEORGE DELMONT LUCE. B.S. 

"Del", "Big Boy" 

Hallowell, Maine 

Born March 21, 1906; Hallowell High School, 1925; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 4; Class Basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LUCY MARIE LUNDELL, A.B. 

"Ross", "Lundy" 

South Paris, Maine 

Born July 5, 1908; South Paris High School; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 3; Basketball 1, 2; Hockey 
1, 2, 4; Soccer 1, 2; Volleyball 3; Gym Meet 1, 2. 3; 
Class Numerals 2; "B" Club 3, 4; English 4A Players 
1, 2, 3, 4; Varsitv Plav 4; Secretary of Class 4; 
Glee Club 4; Alethea 2, 3; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer 4; Outing Club Director 3, 4; Sodali- 
tas Latina 3, 4. 



PRISCILLA LUNDERVILLE, A.B. 

"Prys" 

Littleton, New Hampshire 

Born August 10, 1907; Littleton High School; Entre 
Nous; Hockey 2, 3, 4 ; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Volley- 
ball 2, 3; Soccer 2. 3; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Gym Meet 2, 3; 
Numerals 2 ; "B" Club 3, 4 ; Medal 4 ; W. A. A. Board 
1, 2, 4, Vice-President 3; Y. W. C. A. Committee 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 4; President 3; Macfarlane Club 2, 3, 
President 4 ; Sophomore Prize Speaking ; Ivy Hop 
Committee; Phil-Hellenic 1, 2, 3; Choir 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Curricula Committee 4; Mirror Board. 



PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 



/0-. 






EUNICE HILL McCUE, A.B. 

"Euny" 

Berwick, Maine 

Born October 29, 1906: Sullivan High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 1, 2, 3; Soccer 
1, Captain 2; Tennis 2, Captain 3; Volleyball 1, 3 
Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Winter Sports 2, 3; Gym Meet 1 
Numerals 2; "B" Club 3, 4; Medal 4; Press Club 1, 
Associate Editor of Student 1. 2, 3; Intercollegiate 
Editor 4. 



FLORA MARJORIE McGLAUFLIN, A.B. 

"Marge" 

Mapleton, Maine 

Born July 11, 1909; Mapleton High School; Outing 
Club ; Entre Nous ; Y. W. C. A. ; Lambda Alpha 2. 



MIRIAM ELIZABETH McMICHAEL. A.B. 

"Mike" 

Pittsfield, Maine 

Born May 19, 1908; Maine Central Institute; Entre 
Nous; Gym Meet 2, 3: Archery 2, 3; Winter Sports 
2, 3 ; Numerals 3 : Y. W. C. A. Committee 3 ; Fresh- 
man Prize Debate ; Sophomore Prize Debate, Prize ; 
Sophomore Prize Speaking ; Sophomore Hop Commit- 
tee ; House Council 3; Varsity Play 3; Junior Exhibi- 
tion; Ivy Day Speaker; La Petite Academie 4; Col- 
lege Organist 3, 4; Orphic Society 3, 4; Macfarlane 
Club 3, 4; English 4A Players 3, 4; Debating Council 
2. 3, 4 ; Varsity Debater 3, 4 ; International Debate 4 ; 
Mirror Board; Assistant in Psychology 4; Delta 
Sigma Rho ; Greek Play. 



VAUGHN HARTLEY MacARTHUR, A.B. 

"Mac" 

Brighton, Massachusetts 

Born January 23, 1900; Curriculum Committee 4 
Class Day Speaker ; Greek Play. 







PAGE FIFTY-NINE 








FRANCES ELIZABETH MAGUIRE, A.B. 

"Fran" 

Manchester, New Hampshire 

Born October 1, 1907; Manchester High School; 
President of Entre Nous 1; Hockey 1, 2, 4; Basket- 
ball 2, 4, Captain 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Baseball 2; Volley- 
ball 1, 3; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Archery 2; Numerals 1; "B" 
Club 2, 3, 4; Medal 3; Alethea 2, President 3 ; Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet 3, President 4; Curriculum Commit- 
tee 4; La Petite Academie 4; Student Board 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Publishing Board 3; Class Secretary 3; Gift Com- 
mittee 4; Class Day Speaker. 



PIERCE MARTIN MAHER, JR.. B.S. 

"Pete" 

New Haven, Connecticut 

Born January 30, 1906; Westminster Academy, 
1922; Football 3," 4 ; Hockey 3, 4; Baseball 4; Varsity 
Club 4; Jordan Scientific Society 4; Outing Club 
2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 2, 3, 4; Chairman Junior Banquet 
Committee. 



MABEL PHYLLIS MISENER. A.B. 

"Phil" 

Orange, Massachusetts 

Born September 12, 1907; Orange High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Lambda Alpha 1, 2; 
Hockey 3, 4; Volleyball Captain 3; Numerals 3; "B" 
Club 4; House Council 4; Politics Club 3, 4; Rams- 
dell Scientific Club 4 ; Assistant in Government 4. 



MILDRED FLORENTINE MITCHELL, A.B. 

"Millie" 

Kezar Falls, Maine 

Born June 27, 1905 ; Porter High School ; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Alethea 2, 3; House Council 4; 
Deutscher Verein 4. 



-J) 



PAGE SIXTY 




JULIUS HENRY MUELLER. JR.. B.S. 
"Julie" 

Framingham, Massachusetts 

Born July 13, 1908; Framingham High School, 1925; 
Freshman Prize Speaking; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; English 4A Players 2, 3, 4, 
Stagecraft Director 4; Business Manager Varsity 
Play 4; Bobcat Board 1, 2; Ivy Day Speaker; Var- 
sity Play 2. 



ALLAN LIBBEY NASH, B.S. 
"Al" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born January 6, 1908; Jordan High School, 1925; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Bobcat 
Board 2; Sophomore Hop Committee; Ivy Day Hop 
Committee ; English 4A Players 4 ; Jordan Scientific 
Society 4; Stagecraft Manager Varsity Play 4; Assist- 
ant in Physics 4 ; Class Day Speaker. 



JOHN MacARTHUR NESS, A.B. 

"John" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born April 24, 1908; Edward Little High School, 
1925; Tordan Scientific Society 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Candidate for Rhodes 
Scholarship 4 ; Chemistry Assistant 2, 3 ; Phi Beta 
Kappa. 



RAYMOND ELMER NILSON, B.S. 

"Swede" 

Worcester, Massachusetts 

Born June 25, 1908; North High School, 1925; 
Freshman Football ; Varsitv Football 2, 3, 4, Captain 
4; Track 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PAGE SIXTY-ONE 









DOROTHY NUTTER, A.B. 

"Dot" 

Salmon Falls, New Hampshire 

Born January 2, 1909; Berwick Academy; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 1, 2, 3 ; Hockey 1, 2, 4; 
Volleyball 3; Hiking 1. 2; Winter Sports 2, Captain 1; 
Tennis 3; Soccer 1, 2, 3; Numerals 1; "B" Club 2, 
3, 4 ; Medal 3 ; Student Government Board 4 ; La 
Petite Academie 2, 3, President 4; Sodalitas Latina 4; 
Honor Student in Latin; Assistant in Latin 4; Phi 
Sigma Iota Fraternity ; Phi Beta Kappa. 



GEORGE ALBERT PATTERSON, B.S. 

"Pat" 

Welchville, Maine 

Born December 23, 1904; Oxford High School, 
1924; Freshman Cross-Country : Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4 ; 
V. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



RUTH EVELYN PATTERSON. A.B. 

"Pat" 

Welchville, Maine 

Born August 30, 1907; Oxford High School; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 4; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Volley Ball 1; Baseball 3; Winter Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Life Saving Emblem 2; Soccer 2, 3, Captain 1; Track 
3 ; Numerals 1 ; "B" Club 2, 3, 4 ; Medal 3 ; Alethea 
2, 3 ; Phil-Hellenic 2, 4, Vice-President 3 ; Politics 
Club 3, Vice-President 4; W. A. A. Board 3; Winter 
Sports Manager 4; House Council 3, 4. 



MARY PENDLEBURY, A.B. 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 

Born February 17, 1907; New Bedford High 
School; Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 1, 2, 4, 
Vice-President 3; Prize Speaking 1, 2; Gym Fund 
Committee; English 4A Players 1, 2, 3. Vice-President 
4 ; Alethea 2, 3 ; Sophomore Hop Committee ; Chair- 
man Junior Cabaret Committee ; Chairman Sophomore 
Vaudeville Committee ; Social Functions Committee ; 
Ivy Day Speaker; Vice-President of Class 3, 4; Chair- 
man Senior Show Committee ; Mirror Board ; Glee 
Club 4. 



PAGE SIXTY-TWO 




FLORENCE PENNELL. A.B. 

"Flo" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born May 27, 1903; Edward Little High School; 
Y. W. C. A.; Lambda Alpha President 4; Bazaar 
Committee 4 ; Student Government Board 4. 



MARY MILLER PIKE, A.B. 

"Mary-Maria" 

Kittery Point, Maine 

Born October 25. 1906 ; Traip Academy ; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 2, 3; Hiking 1, 3; 
Volleyball 2. 3; Archery Championship 3; Numerals 
2 ; "B" Club 3, 4 ; Deutscher Verein 3, 4 ; Lambda 
Alpha 2, 3, 4; Assistant in Sociology 3; Assistant 
in English 4; Honor Student in English; Phi Beta 
Kappa. 



CARL LEON POLINI. A.B. 

"Carl- 
Worcester, Massachusetts 

Born July 10. 1903; North High School, 1925; 
Freshman Football ; Freshman Track ; Track 2 ; Cross- 
Country 3 ; Bates Student 2, 3, 4, Advertising Man- 
ager 4; Politics Club 3, 4; Secretary-Treasurer 4; 
Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Gift Committee. 



CECIL FRANCIS POOLER, B.S. 

"Pooch" 

Brewer, Maine 

Born September 27, 1908; Brewer High School. 
1925; Baseball 1. 3, 4; Hockey 3, 4, Captain 4; Fresh- 
man Hockey; Varsity Club 3, 4; Jordan Scientific 
Society 4 ; Vice-President West Parker Hall Associa- 
tion 3, President 4; Inter-dorm Basketball 1; Com- 
mencement Hop Committee. 



PAGE SIXTY-THREE 







m|r:**, 4b4r g% %* 





GILBERT REUEL RHOADES, A.B. 

"Gibby" 

Harmony, Maine 

Born February 26, 1909 ; Harmony High School 
1925; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3 
La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4 ; French Club Plays 2, 3 
Orphic Societv 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4 ; Glee Club 2 
3, 4, President 4; Choir 3, 4; Band 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Mac- 
farlane Club 3, 4. 



CHARLES HUEN RILEY, B.S. 

"Riley" 

Sabattus, Maine 

Born April 5, 1907; Sabattus High School, 1925; 
Freshman Cross-Country ; Cross-Country 2; Track 1, 
2; Jordan Scientific Society 4. 



GILBERT WILLIAMS ROBINSON, A.B. 

"Bob" 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Born March 18, 1907; Jamaica Plain High School, 
1925; Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Greek Play. 



WARREN TURNER ROWE, B.S. 

"Skete" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born July 20, 1906; Jordan High School, 1925; 
Freshman Football ; Varsitv Football 2 ; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Jordan Scientific 
Society 4. 



PAGE SIXTY-FOUR 



HELEN REBECCA SANDERS, A.B. 

Portland, Maine 

Born October 20, 1906; N. H. Fay High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 2, 3, 4; Hiking 
1, 2, 3; Archery 3; Numerals 2; "B" Club 3, 4; 
Cosmos Club 4, Secretary 3 ; Ramsdell Scientific 
Society, Vice-President 3, President 4 ; Greek Play. 



WINIFRED ELOISE SANDERS, A.B. 

"Winnie" 

Portland, Maine 

Born April 16, 1908; N. H. Fay High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 2; Hiking 1, 
2, 3; Gym Meet 2, 3; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Volleyball 
1, 2; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Baseball 3; Track 1, 2, 3; 
Soccer 1, 2, Captain 3; Senior Life Saving 2; 
Numerals 1; "B" Club 2, 3, 4; Medal 3 ; Cup 4; 
Student Government Board 2, 4, Vice-President 3 ; 
Student Curriculum Committee 3, 4; Outing Club 
Director 4 ; La Petite Academie 4 ; Ramsdell Scien- 
tific Society 4. 



ESTHER BOWMAN SARGENT, A.B. 

Mansfield, Massachusetts 

Born July 23. 1910; Mansfield High School; Bos- 
ton University 1 ; Hiking 2, 3 ; Numerals 3 ; Y. W. 
C. A.; Politics Club 3, 4; Outing Club; La Petite 
Academie 4. 



PAUL RAYMOND SELFRIDGE, B.S. 

"Pop" 

Littleton, Massachusetts 

Born August 6, 1907; Littleton High School, 1925; 
English 4A Players 2, 3, 4, Stagecraft Manager 3 ; 
Manager of 1928 Varsity Play; Sophomore Vaude- 
ville; 4A One-Act Plays 2, 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PAGE SIXTY- FIVE 











CHARLES SIEGEL. A.B. 

"Charlie" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born October 20, 1907; Edward Little High School, 
1925; Orphic Society 1, 2, 3, 4; Deutscher Verein 
2, 3, 4 ; La Petite Academie 3, 4, Vice-President 4 ; 
French Club Plays 3; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Phi 
Sigma Iota 4, Treasurer 4 ; Honor Student 4. 



RUTH ELIZABETH SKELTON. A.B. 

"Sunny" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born July 28, 1907; Jordan High School; Entre 
Nous; Lambda Alpha 1, 2, 3, Treasurer 4; Y. W. 
C. A. Committee 3 ; W. A. A. Board 4, Manager of 
Hiking; Hockey 1, 3, 4; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Volley- 
ball 2 ; Basketball 3 ; Baseball 3, Captain ; Soccer 1, 
2, 3; Golf Club 1; Tennis 1, 2, 3; Numerals 2; "B" 
Club 2, 3, 4 ; Class Banquet Committee 3 ; Sodalitas 
Latina 4; Deutscher Verein 4. 



GORDON BURGESS SMALL, A.B. 

"Iby", "Smallie" 

Brockton, Massachusetts 

Born December 1, 1907; Brockton High School 
1924; Macfarlane Club 3, 4 ; La Petite Academie 3, 4 
Glee Club 3; Orphic Society 3, 4; Phi Sigma Iota 4 
Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 4; Outing Club 1, 2 
3, 4; Band 1. 2, 3, 4; Manager Orphic Society 3 
Golf Club 2, 3. 



STANLEY FITZON SNELL, B.S. 

"Stan", "Fitzon" 

Somerville, Massachusetts 

Born November 8, 1906; Somerville High School, 
1925; Football 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, President 
4; Outing Club 1. 2, 3, 4, Board of Directors 2, 3, 4 ; 
Sub-Freshman Committee 3. 



PAGE SIXTY-SIX 



JAMES NELSON SOLOMON, JR., A.B. 

"Jimmie", "Sol" 

Center Harbor, New Hampshire 

Born February 27, 1908; English 4A Players 1, 2, 
3, 4, President 4; Politics Club 3, 4; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 
3, 4 ; Million Dollar Play 1 ; Bates Student 2, 3, 4, 
Assistant Managing Editor 3, Managing Editor 4; 
Assistant General Manager Varsity Play 2 ; Sopho- 
more Vaudeville Committee; Junior Entertainment 
Committee ; Stage Manager May Festival 2 ; Manager 
Freshman Prize Debate 1 ; Sophomore Prize Speak- 
ing ; Y. W. C. A. 3-Act Plav 2; Bobcat Board 2; 
Gardiner High Debating Coach 1928-29; Phillips High 
Debating Coach 1929 ; Ivy Day Speaker ; Editor-in- 
Chief of the Mirror. 




EUGENIA MAXIM SOUTHARD, A.B. 

"Genie" 

Portland, Maine 

Born March 6, 1908; Deering High School; Entre 
Nous; Freshman Prize Debate; Freshman Prize 
Speaking ; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4 ; Sodalitas Latina 4 ; 
Winter Sports 1; Hiking 1, 2, 3, 4; Numerals 2; 
House Council 3 ; Debating Council 2, 3, Vice-Presi- 
dent 4 ; Varsity Debate 2, 3. 4 ; International Debating 
Team 4 ; Assistant in Argumentation 3, 4 ; Delta 
Sigma Rho : Phi Beta Kappa. 






BATESTON FRANKLIN STODDARD, B.S. 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born April 14. 1908; Jordan High School, 1925; 
Honor Student in Mathematics 4 ; Assistant in Geology 
and Astronomy 4 ; Jordan Scientific Society 4. 



DAVID SVETKEY, B.S. 

"Dave" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born November 23, 1906, at Kiev, Russia; Edward 
Little High School, 1924; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
Basket! all 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2. 3, 4. 



* ^. 



PAGE SIXTY-SEVEN 








ERMA ELIZABETH TETLEY, A.B. 

"Tet" 

South Paris, Maine 

Born February 4, 1910 ; Madison High School ; 

Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 4; Hiking 1, 2, 3; 

Winter Sports 3; Archery 2, 3; Numerals 2; "B" 
Club 3, 4; Cosmos 4; Glee Club 4. 



WENDELL WILLIAM TETLEY, A.B. 

"Tet" 

South Paris, Maine 

Born December 30, 1908; Madison High School, 
1924; La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 4; Class 
Treasurer 2; Baseball 2, 3, Manager 4; Varsity Club 
4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



PHILIP ELZEAR TETREAU. A.B. 

"Phil" 

Portland, Maine 

Born June 4, 1904; Portland High School, 1922 
Football 1 ; La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4, President 3 
Spofford Club 2, 3, 4, President 4; Politics Club 3, 4 
Bates Student 3, 4; Mirror Board 4; Only surviving 
ex-President of the Class of 1929. 



GRETA CAROLINE THOMPSON, A.B. 

"Gretch" 

Ocean Park, Maine 

Born January 3, 1907; Oak Grove Seminary; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 2, 3; Numerals 3; Fresh- 
man Prize Speaking ; Orphic Societv 2. 3, 4 ; La Petite 
Academie 4 ; Deutscher Verein 3, 4 ; Greek Play. 



PAGE SIXTY-EIGHT 



JOSEPH BERNARD TOPOLOSKY. B.S. 

"Toppy" 

Woodland, Maine 

Born February 27. 1908; Woodland High School, 
1924; Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Hockev 3, 4; Varsity Club 
4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Jordan Scientific Society 4. 



CORNELIUS TURNER, JR., B.S. 

"Neil" 

Plymouth, New Hampshire 

Born March 21, 1907; Plymouth High School, 1924; 
Baseball 3, 4; Varsity Club 4; Jordan Scientific Society 
4; Chairman Ivy Day Committee; Class Basketball 
1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Chairman Class Gift Committee. 



EVELYN MILDRED WEBB, A.B. 

Groveton, New Hampshire 

Born Mav 5, 1907; Groveton High School; Entre 
Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1, 2, 3 ; Archery 2, 3; 
Winter Sports 2, Captain 3 ; Numerals 2 ; "B" Club 
3, 4: Student Government 3, 4; President House 
Council 4; La Petite Academie 2, 3, 4; Sodalitas 
Latina 3, President 4 ; Honor Student in Latin ; Phi 
Sigma Iota Fraternity; Phi Beta Kappa. 



WEDGEWOOD PERKINS WEBBER, B.S. 

"Wedge" 

Lewiston, Maine 

Born January 29, 1908; Jordan High School, 1925; 
Football 1; Jordan Scientific Society 4; Outing Club 
1, 2, 3, 4, Board of Directors 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 




PAGE SIXTY-NINE 




n 



ALFRED ATWOOD WHIPPLE. A.B. 

"Al", "Whip" 

Franconia, New Hampshire 

Born May 26, 1905; Dow Academy. 1924; Phil- 
Hellenic 4; Sodalitas Latina 4; Outing Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 



r- 



ELEANOR ADELAIDE WOOD, A.B. 

"Woodie" 

Kingfield, Maine 

Born October 21, 1906; Stanley High School; 
Entre Nons; Y. W. C. A. Committee 2; Hiking 1, 3, 
4, Captain 2; Gym Meet 2, 3; Baseball 2, 3; Track 3; 
Numerals 2; "B" Club 3. 4; Alethea 2, 3; Glee Club 
2, Vice-President 3. President 4; English 4A Players 
2, 3, 4; Student Government Board 4. Secretary- 
Treasurer 3; Spofford Club 4; Sophomore Prize 
Speaking; Junior Exhibition; Ivy Day Speaker; Mir- 
ror Board ; Class Day Speaker ; Greek Play. 



EDNA BLACKBURN YORK. A.B. 

Kennebunk, Maine 

Born September 22, 1905; Kennebunk High School 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4 
Spofford Club 4 ; Greek Prize 1 ; Mirror Board 4 
Assistant in English 4; Honor Student in English 
Phi Beta Kappa. 






FRANCIS CARROLL YOUNG, A.B. 

"France" 

Southwest Harbor, Maine 

Born November 28, 1903; Pemetic High School, 
1923; Track 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Outing Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. 
C. A. 1, 2; Deutscher Verein 4. 



PAGE SEVENTY 



GRACE ELIZABETH YOUNG, A.B. 

Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Born February 12, 1905 ; Deering High School ; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Committee 3, 4; Hiking 
1, 2, 3; Volleyball 1, 2, 3; Winter Sports 3; Numerals 
2; "B" Club 3, 4; Lambda Alpha 1, 2; Sodalitas 
Latina 4; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4; Honor Student in 
Greek ; Phi Beta Kappa. 



MILDRED EVELYN YOUNG. A.B. 

Haverhill, Massachusetts 

Born February 7, 1907; Deering High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Hiking 1, 2, 3, Winter 
Sport* 3: Numerals 2; "B" Club 3, 4; Lambda Alpha 
1, 2; Phil-Hellenic 2, 3, 4 ; Sodalitas Latina, Secretary- 
Treasurer 4; Honor Student in Greek. 



MILDRED LOWELL YOUNG, A.B. 

"Mil" 

Auburn, Maine 

Born December 2, 1907 ; Edward Little High 
School; Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A.; Lambda Alpha 
1, 2, 3, 4; La Petite Academie 4. 



VIOLA GERTRUDE ZAHN, A.B. 

"Vi" 

Hingham Center, Massachusetts 

Born January 30, 1907; Hingham High School; 
Entre Nous; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 4; Deutscher 
Verein 3, 4; Cosmos 3, 4, Vice-President 4. 



y 



• 




e* V 



^ 



JAMES G. COLE, B.S. 

"Jimmie" 

Arlington, Vermont 

Born February 3, 1903; Ben- 
nington, Vermont, High School; 
Troy Conference Academy; Var- 
sity Baseball 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; 
■ Commons Committee 3; Athletic 
H Council 3; Varsity Club 3, 4, 
"Vice-President 4; Outing Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 





PAGE SEVENTY-ONE 





Ibg gag, Class of 1929 



Prayer 

Address of Welcome 

Oration 

Ivy Day Poem 

Ivy Ode 

To the Faculty 

To the Co-eds 

To the Men 

To the Athletes 

To the Seniors 

Prophecy 

Gifts to Women 

Gifts to Men 



William J. Brookes 

Philip E. Tetreau 

William H. Bull 

Shirley E. Albee 

Miriam E. McMichael 

Walter O. Hodsdon 

Paul Chesley 

Faith L. Blake 

Julius H. Mueller, Jr. 

Eleanor A. Wood 

Mary Pendlebury 

L. Kenneth Green 

Ethelyn E. Hoyt 



Toastmastcr, James N. Solomon, Jr. 

Chairman, Philip E. Tetreau 

Marshall, Frank F. Colburn, Jr. 



PAGE SEVENTY-TWO 




$nmor (fetri bittern, Class of 1929 

The Men's Prize was won by Howard Bull and the Women's Prize by 
Hazel Blanchard. 



programme 

"The Spirit of Memorial Day" 

"Philosophy in Literature" 

"The Silent Stars" 

"The Soil of Experience" 

"The Last Full-measure of Devotion" 

"Sources of Power and 'The Melting Pot' ' 

"Celtic Fancy in English Poetry" 



Faith Lorraine Blake 

Paul Chesley 

Miriam Elizabeth McMichael 

Hazel Barrett Blanchard 

Eleanor Adelaide Wood 

William Howard Bull 

Yvonne Louise Langlois 



PAGE SEVENTY-THREE 





lonor Students 



Mary M. Pike 
Edna B. York 
Dorothy Nutter 
Yvonne L. Langlois 
John P. Hassett 



Lewis L. Gray 
Walter N. Durost 



3n language 



Evelyn M. Webb 
Charles Siegel 
Grace E. Young 
Mildred E. Young 



3n pt)tlo5opf)?> 



Helen B. Holman 
Ruth E. Conant 



Edward G. Bilodeau 
Lawrence C. LeBeau 
Theodore E. Field 



In ^rtcncc 



John M. Ness 
Bateston Stoddard 



PAGE SEVENTY-FOUR 




|){ri 58 ek lappa 



Hazel Barrett Blaxchard 
Mary Burxham Briggs 
Ruth Elena Coxaxt 
Walter Xelsox Durost 
Theodore Erxest Field 
Libby Rachel Goldman 
Yvonne Louise Laxglois 
Lawrence Charles LeBeau 



Johx MacArthur Xess 
Dorothy Nutter 
Mary Miller Pike 
Eugenia Maxim Southard 
Evelyn Mildred Webb 
Edna Blackburn York 
Grace Elizabeth Young 



PAGE SEVENTY-FIVE 



%kwtot Won bg Class of 1929 



General. Scholarship — Freshman Year 
Theodore E. Field 
Yvonne L. Langlois 
Edna B. York 



Sophomore Year 

Eugenia M. Southard 
Theodore E. Field 



Excellence in Greek — Freshmen Year 
Edna B. York 
Lucy M. Lundell 
Benjamin Gruber 

Champion Debate — Freshmen Year 
Ruth E. Conant 
Walter O. Hodsdon 
Eugenia M. Southard 



Junior Year 

Edna B. York 
Theodore E. Field 

English Composition — Sophomore Year 
Eleanor Gile 

Public Speaking — Freshman Year 
Paul Chesley 
Mary Pendlebury 

Sophomore Year 

William J. Brooks 
Faith L. Blake 



Best Individual Speaker 

Eugenia M. Southard 

Sophomore Year 

Ruth E. Conant 
Miriam E. McMichael 

Best Individual Speaker 

Miriam E. McMichael 

Original Parts 

William H. Bull 
Hazel B. Blanchard 

The Coe Scholarship 

Theodore E. Field 



Argumentation 

Eugenia M. Southard 

Biblical Literature 

Helen B. Holman 
Walter N. Durost 

Biology 

Paul Chesley^ 
Maynard B. Collev 
Henry C. Cullinan 

Chemistry 

Anthony M. LaGasse 
Walter" O. Hodsdon 

Education 

Pauline Davis 



English 



French 



Mary Pike 
Edna B. York 

Yvonne L. Langlois 
Libby R. Goldman 
A. Cleo Higgins 



Geology 



Bateston F. Stoddard 

Government 

M. Phvllis Misener 



History 



Latin 



Doris M. Chick 



Dorothv Nutter 



Philosophy 

Miriam E. McMichael 

Physics 

Allen L. Nash 

Physical Education 

William C. Kilbourne 

Sociology 

Hazel B. Blanchard 



Spanish 



Frances A. Bartkus 



PAGE SEVENTY-SIX 



.former Hlcmbers of the Class of 1929 



Miriam Elizabeth Alexander 
Edward Arnold 
Roscoe Kidder Berry 
Robert Noyes Brackett 
Edna Miriam Bradford 
William James Brookes 
Samuel Brown 
John Murray Carroll. Jr. 
Gilbert Clapperton 
Ernest Herbert Culverwell 
George Hartley Curtis 
Howard Ford Curtis 
Herbert Sewal Edgecomb 
Theda Louise Fox 
Cecil Eugene Garcelon 
Gordon Gilbert 
Edith Alberta Goodwin 
Howard Russell Goody 
Arthur Stanwood Gray 
Benjamin Alexander Hall 
Myer Halperin 
Hollis Hill Hamilton 
Richard Seldon Harris 
Zylpha Whitmore Hatch 
Herbert Wesley Hathaway 
Philip Arthur Hazelton 
Henry Ellsworth Hobbs 
Langdon Austin Hooper 



George Henry Johnson, Jr. 
John Flandreau Lambden 
Noel Louis LeVasseur 
George Stanley Leveille 
Doris Marie Libby 
Joseph Roland Lyman 
Milton Macey 
Howard Stanley McElnea 
Chester Wilgar Moore, Jr. 
Edward John O'Neil 
Francis Andrew Ouillette 
Stanley Irving Perham 
Phyllis Irene Piper 
James Douglas Preble 
Wilfred Gould Rice 
William Joseph Salter 
Roy Leighton Sinclair, Jr. 
Harold Knowland Smith 
Neal Stanley 
Ruby Mae Stevens 
Donald Randolph Torrey 
Alton Merrill Weeks 
Ralph Charles Wescott 
Arline Loretta Wilder 
Sterling Delos Williams 
Francis Herbert Wise 
Edgar Avery Wood 
Eleanor Ruth Yeadon 



PAGE SEVENTY • SEVEN 



1/"%^ 





Class §ag 



Prayer 

Oration 

Class Poem 

Class History 

Address to Mothers and Fathers 

Address to Halls and Campus 

Last Will and Testament 

Farewell Address 

Pipe Oration 

Class Ode 



Walter Nelson Durost 

Julian Stewart Bigelow 

Yvonne L. Langlois 

Eleanor Adelaide Wood 

Frances Elizabeth Maguire 

Helen Bernice Holman 

Louis Kenneth Green 

William Howard Bull 

Vaughn Hartley Mac Arthur 

Miriam McMichaEL 



Toast-master, John Paul Hassett 

Marshal, Allan Libbey Nash 
Chairman, William Howard Bull 



PAGE SEVENTY-EIGHT 



Class Iptfem 



YOUTH 

Oh, heart of Youth, that loves to seek, to dare, 

Gift of the gods, so precious and so fair ! 

What can you not accomplish ? Health is yours ; 

Truth has been opened unto you ; it pours 

From its full horn an untold wealth of gold 

And precious stones, a ransom for a king. 

Oh, radiant Youth, what happy thoughts you bring! 

You are the flower of earth ; God made you so. 

He fashioned you like spring, eager to go. 

Bursting with life and love, your buds unfold. 

You are the torch the world holds high ; to you 
She looks for courage, high ideals and true. 
You are the vanguard, you must have the will 
To stand in face of danger, stand until 
The fight is won, or you have died for truth. 
Your task is great ; nor life is only song. 
You cannot dream and idly drift along. 
But have no fear; a weapon proud you hold; 
A flaming sword, worth more to you than gold. 
You have the shining, flaming sword of Youth. 



Yvonne L. Langlois 



Class #be 



To-day marks the end of our college years, 
To the end of our course we have run : 
And as when the victor is granted the crown, 
We can hear, "Twenty-nine, well done." 
Classmates, the hours we've spent together 
Too fleeing now they seem. 
Friendship lasts, all else is 
Memory — a dream. 

Memories of our Alma Mater, 

Of her traditions too 

Of ideals and truth and honor 

Of Bates spirit true. 

Farewell, our dear Foster Mother, 

'Tis hard for us to say. 

Wilt thou ever guard and bless us, when 

For twenty-nine we pray : 

Mother of men and women of fame 
Make us worthy of thy name. 

WORDS AND MUSIC BY 

Miriam E. McMichaEL 



PAGE SEVENTY-NINE 



Jftcrtn the giarg ai the Class of 1029 

jfresljman gear 

September 24 

General appearance of campus greatly improved by the arrival of the Class of 

1929. 
September 26 

We were guests at the first "I am — you are" party. — Cider and dough- 
nuts ! ! ! 

A welcome speech by Prexy ! 
October 1 

100% attendance at the Empire to see Harold Lloyd in "The Freshman". 

Fletcher Shea, '27, received a football — our first introduction to an upper 

class "big shot". 
October 5 and 6 

Many a strong brow paled at the sight of our co-ed classmates. Who'd have 

thought they could look so unattractive ! ! Bedecked with stocking-leg caps, 

green ribbons, huge white gloves, doing little jigs and inviting folks to "step 

right up ?nd call them speedy". 
October 9 (afternoon) 

Special cars took us to Lake Auburn, the Annual Freshman Ride — more cider 

and doughnuts. What a time!! 
October 9 (evening) 

At the Freshman-Sophomore Banquet, had our first introduction to Ray 

Thompson and his funny stories. Twenty-nine, still smarting from the 

paddling of the "week end" (previous). 
October 12 

First Observance of Founders Day. Our first opportunity to hear Prof. 

Hartshorn. 
October 16 

Bates wins Bates-Oxford debate. 

We read in the Student that Betty Crafts' papa plans to establish music 

courses here. Betty flooded with inquiries as to whether he was easy to get 

along with. 
October 16 

Ankled to Thorncrag with the rest of the Outing Club. Met Karl Wood- 
cock and his camera. Asked him if he roomed on campus ! 
October 17 

Our fighting Bobkitten eleven beat Rumford High by two touchdowns. 

Our cross-country team, under Ray Buker's direction, outran Coburn Classi- 
cal — that makes two victories to date. 
October 27 (evening) 

Sat through our first George Colby Chase Lecture. Dr. Gilkey, a University 

of Chicago Trustee, obliged. 
November 6 

Doris David elected captain Freshman Co-ed Hockey team. 
November 9 

Week of Prayer starts off with a bang. Raymond Nilson sneezed in Chapel. 

It almost started a riot. 
November 9 (sort of a Gray evening) 

Prexy again. A small group of Freshmen entertained by Pres. and Mrs. Grav 

at their home, Malcolm Gray at the piano. 



PAGE EIGHTY 




November 10 

West Parker Freshmen are commissioned to police the reception room. 
November 20 

Outing Club cabin at Thorncrag being rushed to completion under impressed 

Freshman labor. 
November 27 (slush and rain) 

Official beginning of unrestricted co-education. Some of us got a bid to the 

Sophomore dance at Rand. 
December 14 (cold as — ) 

Corner stone for new Athletic Building laid. Building made possible thru 

the gift of Mr. Bingham. Prexy again. 
January 10 

Henry Cullinan, '29, recognized by Boston Sunday and daily papers as a wood 

carver of no mean ability. 
February 15 

Dr. Allen K. Foster in chapel advises girls to use old love-making plan — 

"Feed the brute; get him young; treat him rough and tell him nothing!!" 

Please note the first admonition. 
February 24 

Whole college mourns loss of Professor Hartshorn, last of old line of Bates 

professors. 
March 6 

Mary Pendlebury and Paul Chesley carry off the honors in Freshman Prize 

Speaking. 
March 13 

Helen Hudson and Mary Pendlebury among delegates at missionary con- 
ference at Colby. Would you believe it ! ! 
March 17 

Doris Chick placed as center on all-college Co-ed Basketball team. 
March 19 

Names of our Co-eds appear in "Stu G.", Y. W. and A. A. nominations. 

feiop&omott gear 

October 1 

Archery added to co-ed sports — for a long time they have been associated 

with the God who made the bow and arrow famous. 
October 1 

Freshman initiation handled with unparalleled success. An example of the 

innocence of 1930 was shown when one poor chap piled lumber all night for 

speaking out of turn ! 
October 29 

Bates wins State X-Country meet. Chesley and Lyman, '29, placed. 
November 6 

Yvonne Langlois, Eugenia Southard and Miriam McMichael win places on 

varsity debating squad. 
November 13 

Faith Blake and William Brookes win Sophomore Prize Speaking Contest. 
November 14 

Prexy again. All three floors and the attic of West Parker were wrapped 

in sombre silence when prexy dropped in, seeking conversational communion. 

Jimmy Baker, tastefully garbed in a colorful bathrobe, acted as host. 
December 1 

The Class of 1929 introduced Frosh-Sophomore Hop idea. It was at this 

PAGE EIGHTY-ONE 



time that the bald-headed boy from Bangor first came into prominence as a 

master of ceremonies. 
December 4 

The Lewiston Police invaded the sanctity of John Bertram Hall in search of 

purloined signs and an incidental barber pole or two. 
December 4 

C. D. Gray Athletic Building christened by Frosh-Soph track meet. We 

won. 
January 13 

Howard Bull, '29, plays lead in the Dover Road. 
January 29 

Sophomore hop. Our first Class Formal, and a wow. 
February 18 

Overcuts popularized, Faculty lowers cost of overcuts from five to three 

points. 
March 16 

Prexy again. Prexy proved conclusively that as a debater he's no slouch, and 

incidentally that man is not a machine ! 
April 22 

The Class of 1929 crashes through with another innovation by presenting a 

Sophomore Vaudeville Show. A huge success. Selfridge proved his ability 

in "Two Crooks and a Lady" to die from a bullet wound despite the failure 

of the gun to go off. 
May 6 

Another Perm Relay Victory. Adams ran with the winning team. 
May 9 

We held a class banquet at the DeWitt. Pres. Wood did not choose to run. 

After visiting at the home of Von Weston, '30, in Hallowell, he returned to 

Lewiston with his escort and attended the banquet. 
May 27 

An unfortunate situation : our co-eds were lined up against our eds in debate. 

The co-eds justified the time-honored claim to superiority in verbal combat. 
June 3 

Philip Tetreau will pilot us through our Junior year. Says the election didn't 

cost him a nickel. 

Junior gear 

September 30 

Spectre of Death hovers over Campus ! The Purity number of the Bobcat 
published on May 15, previous, proved too much for "the powers' " sense 
of propriety. It just wasn't 99 44/100 % pure. "Requiescat in Pace", said 
Prexy. Please omit flowers. 

September 30 

Scandal ! ! ! ! Dean of Women confesses to having played tiddle-winks at 
Monte Carlo during her summer abroad. Ruthie, we're surprized ! ! 

September 30 

A million dollar bulletin board in front of Hathorn. Gift of Class of '27. 
Wonder if it's paid for? 

October 31 (fair and warmer) 

We finally get an extra day at Thanksgiving. Hurray ! 

November 1 

What! No oil! We blamed the maid, she said it was Bob MacDonald's 
fault, he said it was Norm Ross' fault. Norm said it was Harry Rowe's fault, 



PAGE EIGHTY-TWO 



he blamed it on the weather ; at any rate we are to have no more oil on our 

dormitory floors. 
November 4 

Guy P. Gannett, a Portland publisher, will head committee to sponsor a Bates 

Round-the-World Debating Tour. 
December 1 

The 4A Players announce that they will sponsor the Varsity Play this year. 
December 2 

The 4A Players present "Outward Bound" with, but one exception, an all-'29 

cast. 
December 15 

Our class takes over management of the Student with unparalleled benefit 

to the aforementioned scandal sheet. 
December 16 

World Tour at last a certainty. Team announced, Ames, '28, Guptill, '28, 

and Davis, '28, to be our globe-trotting orators. 
February 6 

Prexy again. Gail Laughlin puts up a pretty stiff battle in a debate with 

Prexy on Segregation vs. Co-education. We're proud to state that Prexy 

upheld Co-education. 
March 10 

1929 again makes the campus sit up and take notice. The Junior Cabaret ! 

All our customers declared it the "best time" of the year. Despite our 

modesty, we were forced to agree with them. 
March 24 

Informal opening of Alumni Gvm. A perfect affair. 
March 24 

And now our co-eds have taken over Student Government, W. A. A. and 

Y. W. offices. 
March 30 

Senior men assume duties in new Y. M. Cabinet. 
April 12 

Faculty decide to extend double cuts ruling to last recitations in all courses. 

Damn ! ! 
April 20 

Annual Varsity Play again sponsored by the 4A Players. 1929 again fur- 
nishes the leads, in the persons of Miriam McMichael and Stewart Bigelow. 
April 28 

Bates wins National Championship in two-mile relay at Penn. 
April 30 

A real welcome for the Victorious Relay team. 
May 6 

Something new and radical, a co-educational commons. We rather enjoyed 

it. Why not make this a permanent fixture ? 
May 10 

Bon Voyage to World Tour Debaters. 
May 11 

Dean Ruth Pope to leave Bates faculty and take up post graduate work at 

Columbia. 
June 1 

Howard Bull will head our class next year. Like Phil. Howard claims he 

didn't have to violate the corrupt practices act to be elected. 



PAGE EIGHTY-THREE 



June 4 

Ivy Hop. 
June 5 

Our Ivy Day. Here's hoping that extr'y special Mount Vernon Ivy we 

planted will grow. 

fe>ntiot geac 

October 5 

J. B. Hall deserted by intelligensia. Only Freshmen left to annoy those in 

charge of the Commons by midnight revels. 
October 19 

Hoover landslide in Student poll — Will Rogers saved a whitewash — 1 vote. 
October 20 

No longer may we clamber up the rugged sides of Mount David — a high 

fence. Mt. David is actually padlocked, my dear ! 
December 14 

Student body rally in protest against release of Coach Wiggin and our 

"athletic policy" ! 
January 4 

David Morey appointed head coach. 
January 11 

Wiggin accepts big position at Wesleyan. 
January 11 

Dr. Finnie gives last talk at the "Y". Bates loses another friend. 
January 28 

Annual Varsity Play again sponsored by 4A Players. "Arms and the Man"., 

by G. B. Shaw. This time featuring Bigelow and Blake. 
February 1 

Mid-years approach but we're happy in the thought that we won't have to 

take any more mid-years, at least we hope not ! 
February 22 

Joint exhibit between Lawrance Chemical and Jordan Scientific Societies. 

Good work and well done. 
March 22 

Phi Beta Kappa elections announced — hurrah for the cognoscenti ! 
April 20 

We presented the Frivolities of 1929. Yes, Mary Pendlebury is missing her 

calling; she should be a show promoter. This is the third class affair of this 

sort that she has managed with unqualified success. 
May 7 

Last appearance of '29's thespians on the Little Theatre stage. "The 

Enemy", by Channing Pollock, provided the vehicle. 
June 21-24 

Our last days together as a class. One matter still weighs heavily on Presi- 
dent Bull's mind, "will that class of mine come across with all the money for 

that new gateway?" 
June 27 

And, now, my dears, may none of us get a blank diploma — and, with compli- 
ments and felicitations — as thev say in dear old Barcelona, Adios. 



PAGE EIGHTY-FOUR 





PAGE EIGHTY-FIVE 








(Mass of 1080 



President, Roy GlEndal Cascadden 

Vice-President, Gladys Evelyn Young 

Secretary, Frances Elizabeth Johnson 

Treasurer, Clifton Leonard Shea 

The mantle of dignified seniority is about to settle upon the shoulders of 
the Class of 1930. As Upperclassmen they have developed in athletics and in 
literary activities, and are fully capable of taking over the reins as the Class of '29 
men and women reluctantly step aside. 

The accomplishments of '30 are fast mounting up into a total which will 
be a mark for succeeding classes to aim at. We bequeath to them our seats 
in chapel, and whatever goes with them, and we feel confident that our successors 
will maintain the tradition of accomplishment which '29 has so well established. 



PAGE EIGHTY-SIX 




Jfrg gag, Class of 1930 



Prayer 

Address of Welcome 

Oration 

Ivy Day Poem 

Ivy Ode 

To the Faculty 
To the Co-eds 
To the Men 
To the Athletes 
To the Seniors 
Prophecy 
Gifts to Women 
Gifts to Men 



Toastmaster, 

Chairman 
Marshal, 



Harold Wellington Richardson 

Roy Glendal Cascadden 

Samuel Gould 

Leslie Wilson Brown 

Dorothy Mae Burdett 

TOASTS 

Edwin Gordon Milk 

Lloyd August Heldman 

Mildred Etta Beckman 

Clifton Leonard Shea 

Constance Stanwood Withington 

Gladys Evelyn Young 

George William Anderson 

Dorothy Margaret Small 

Charles Clement Cushing 

Roy Glendal Cascadden 

Rangnar Godfrey Lind 



PAGE EIGHTY-SEVEN 



F". 



/^sgw 



%3toe tw^^ 




fttttT'OI* 



%bmxbs Wan bw Class of 1930 



General Scholarships — Freshman Year 
Mildred E. Beckman 
Leslie W. Brown 

Sophomore Year 

Mildred E. Beckman 
Muriel C. Beckman 
Donald E. Strout 
John H. Manning 

Public Speaking — Freshman Year 
Lillian G. Hill 
Livingston Lomas 

Sophomore Year 

Emma Meservey 
Livingston Lomas 

English Composition 

Samuel B. Gould 



Champion Debates — Freshman Yeak 
Lauris B. Whitman 
Muriel C. Beckman 
Robert N. Hislop 



Best Individual Speaker 
Samuel B. Gould 



Sophomore Year — Women's Team 
Muriel C. Beckman 
Mildred E. Beckman 
Mildred L. Tourtillott 



Sophomore Year — Men's Team 
Calvin J. Bassett 
Donald E. Strout 



Excellence in Greek 
Ruth I. Shaw 
Lillian G. Hill 
Belmont W. Adams 



Best Individual Speakers 
Muriel C. Beckman 
Samuel B. Gould 



8£>£>i«jtant£>f)tiH 



Biology 

M. Althea Foster 

Chemistry 

Loring W. Blanchard 
Cecil E. Miller 

Economics 

Mildred E. Beckman 
Muriel C. Beckman 



English 



Greek 



Edwin G. Milk 



Donald E. Strout 



Mathematics 

D. Alvord Stearns 
Leslie W. Brown 



Physics 



George S. Everett 



PAGE EIGHTY-EIGHT 



Class Sioll, 1930 



Anderson, George William 
Appleby, Reid Simpson 
Ayer, Raymond Thompson 
Bagley, Kenton Reed 
Baker, Ida 
Balch, Aurie Ninette 
Barnes, Carl Edmund 
Bassett, Calvin Jordan 
Bassett, Louise Morton 
Beckman, Mildred Etta 
Beckman, Muriel Caroline 
Bixby, Louise Stone 
Blanchard, Loring Webber, 
Bornstein, Hymen Sam 
Briggs, Martha Rackley 
Broggi, Carl Joseph 
Brown, Leslie Wilson 
Buckingham, Cornelia Fran 
Buddington, John Edgar 
Burdett, Dorothy Mae 
Burke, Helen Louise 
Burns, Christine Fern 
Carnie, George Paul 
Cascadden, Roy Glendal 
Chase, Hazel Eloise 
Clark, Beth 
Cogan, John Bernard 
Conant, Norman Francis 
Chick, Benjamin 
Coombs, Milford Leighton 
Cotton, John Howard 
Gushing, Charles Clement 
Cutts, Jeanette 
Dingley, Fred Raymond 
Ellis, Rachael Mildred 
Everett, George Stanley 
Fisher, Stanley Clay 
Fitz, Russell Andrew 
Foster, Iva Warner 
Foster, Mary Althea 
Geary, Helen Gertrude 
Gilbert, Fred Austin 
Gilbert, Richard Earle 
Goody, Howard Russell 



Gould, Nancy 
Gould, Samuel 
Grant, Roland Chester 
Hanscom, Dorothy Jean 
Hanscom, Dorothy Lucille 
Haskell, Dorothy Marguerite 
Hatch, Grace Sibley 
Heldman, Lloyd August 
Hernan, Elinor Rhodes 
Hill, Lillian Gertrude 
Hislop, Robert Norman 
Hollis, Raymond Otis 
Jr.Hooper, Evelyn Ruth 
Houle, Romeo Joseph 
Howe, Harris Winchester 
Hubbard, Flavius Borden 
Hudson, Helen Marjorie 
ces Hutchins, Nathalie 

Hutchinson, Richard Henry 
Irving, Edgar Wellington 
Jackson, Robert Fontaine 
Jewett, Charlotte Hastings 
Johnson, Frances Elizabeth 
Jordan, Clayton Philip 
Kilbourne, Samuel Warren 



Milk, Edwin Gordon 
Miller, Cecil Elwood 
Miller, Harold Maurice 
Moultrie, Henry Alexander 
Nichols, Catherine Ruth 
Page, Beulah Helen 
Panzarella, Frank 
Parsons, Bernice Luella 
Peabody, Everett Tilson 
Perkins, Wilhelmina 
Pratt, Lydia May 
Record, Jeanette Bonney 
Richardson, Harold Wellington 
Roche, Mary Elizabeth 

Rogers, Ruth Miriam 

Ross, Lillian May 

Rowe, Arthur Raymond 

Salley, George Henry 

Schurman, Stella Mae 

Scott, Edward Philip 

Secor, Morris Howard 

Seeton, Frederic Everett 

Shaw, Ruth Isabelle 

Shea, Clifton Leonard 

Sinclair, William Thomas 



Knowlton, Chadbourne RichardSmall, Dorothy Margaret 



LaChance, Joan 
LaGasse, Anthony Maurice 
Lancaster, Margaret Louise 
Leadbetter, Ona Filene 
Levin, Fannie Rose 
Liebe, Milton Robert 
Lind, Rangnar Godfrey 
Lizotte, Levite 
Lomas, Livingston Henry 
Louder, Harold Wayne 
Lovelace, Daniel Dudley, Jr. 
McCann, Norman Everett 
McCaughey, Helen Gertrude 
McKusick, Grace Mildred 
Malia, Francis 
Manning, John Hugh 
Merrill, Norman Edith 
Meservey, Emma 



Spofford, David Keith 
Stackpole, Philip Angier 
Stearns, Alvord Daniel 
Strout, Donald Everett 
Thurlow, Norman Nelson 
Tourtillott, Mildred Lovina 
Towle, Lloyd Kirk 
Trecartin, Gertrude Virginia 
Veilleux, Cecile Evangeline 
Weston, VonManley 
Wetherell, Alliston Chester 
Whitman, Lauris Burchard 
Whittier, Carl Herbert 
Withing-ton, Constance 

Stanwood 
Wright, Elizabeth Scriven 
Young, Gladys Evelyn 
Young, Helen Gertrude 



PAGE EIGHTY-NINE 




PAGE NINETY 






PAGE NINETY-ONE 




JJk-%4p- •#■ 



m 




Class of 1931 



President, Samuel Morris Kenison 

Vice-President, Dorothy Elizabeth Parker 
Secretary, Dorothy Morse 

Treasurer, Howard Emery Thomas 

Having discarded the behavior and rank of Freshmen, and assumed the role 
of Sophomores, the Class of '31 has gone in there to do or die for old Bates, 
with characteristic determination. 

To date they have gone about their tasks like nobody's business, and can 
present a comfortable list of contributions, the results of steady work in a 
broad field. 

'31 started in to orient the new crop of yearlings, and in their handling of 
the situation, left nothing to be desired. The polished way in which they have 
so far performed is no doubt due in large part to solidarity of their class 
Spirit which was so well illustrated by their re-election of President Kenison, 
who piloted them so successfully as a Freshman. 



PAGE NINETY-TWO 





^opbmrurre IPri^c Speaking 



The annual Sophomore Prize Speaking Contest was won this year by Russell 
Edwards of West Sagville, New York, and Dorothy Morse of Canton, Maine. 
The speeches were well presented. 



programme 



"Jean Desprey" 

"A Plea for Cuba" 

"Judas Iscariot" 

"Justice, Right, Duty, Freedom' 

"Ojistoh" 

"Equal Opportunity" 

"Ashes of Roses" 

"The Man of Vision" 

"Syrano de Berjerac" 

"Gettysburg" 

"The Soldier's Reprieve" 

"America's Mission" 

"Strongheart" 

"Toussaint L'Ouverture" 



Emma Abbott 

J. Russell Edwards 

Dorothy V. Stiles 

Stanley I. Perham 

Beth Clark 

Howard E. Thomas 

Dorothy Morse 

Martin C. Sauer 

Gladys E. Underwood 

Howard H. Gerrish 

Edith M. Lenfest 

Bernard Krosnick 

Dorothy E. Parker 

Everett E. Cushman 



PAGE NINETY-THREE 




Class Soil, 1931 



Abbott, Emma 
Abkowitz, Jack Laib 
Adams, Belmont Wilson 
Adams, Lucile Marguerite 
Allbee, Shasta Josephine 
Allman, Alice Louise 
Alpren, Israel 
Anderson, Heber Charles 
Anderson, William Aldrich 
Aronoff, Victor 
Banks, Virginia Damon 
Baron, Harry Morris 



Green, Harry James, Jr. 
Greenlaw, Hollis Sheldon 
Guptill, Hazel Louise 
Hager, Willis Warren 
Hall, Leona 
Hanscom, Lillian Julia 
Harmon, Margaret Louise 
Hayes, Frederick Dennis 
Hayes, Lewis Wendell 
Healey, Mi Idled Sophia 
Heddericg, Otto Christie 
Herrick, Guy Scott 



Barrowclough, Gertrude AnnaHewett, Louise Evelyn 



Beal, Violetta Mae 
Berry, Marcia 
Bornstein, Benjamin 
Boucher, Laurianna Adele 
Brawn, Hildon Maynard 
Brewster, Edward Eldredge 
Brown, Samuel 
Bulger, Bennet Aretas 
Burris, Franklin Ernest 
Butler, Kathleen Fiances 
Butterfleld, Eliot Graham 



Higgins, Hayward Woodruff 
Hobbs, Henry Ellsworth 
Holt, Ernest Knowlton 
Hoyt, Herbert Edwin 
Huff, Nevel William 
Irish, Marion Fassett 
Johnson. George Henry, Jr. 
Johnson, Solomon Boyce 
Jones, Stuart Whitten 
Kenison, Samuel Morris 
Kent, George Leslie Hilton 



Butterfleld,, Margaret Florence Kimball, Wilder Virgil, Jr. 



Chap, James John 
Chapman, Russell Hood 
Colby, Reginald Merton 
Christopher, Dorothy Emily 
Cook, Esther Brayton 
Cross, Gordon Bismark 
Cushman, Everett Edward 
Day, Louise Walker 
Dodge, Julian Francis 
Dore, Kenneth Everett 
Dow, Eleanor George 
Dwinal, Charles Frederick 
Elliot, Olive Myra 
Estes, Carl Edgar 
Fuller, John Langworthy 
Furtwengler, Willis Joseph 
Gernish, Henry Thomas 
Gerrish, Howard Hamlin 
Gordon, Katharine Irene 
Gottesfeld, Malvin David 

Wilmott 
Green, Harriet 



Krosnick, Bernard 
Larrabee, Franklin Richard 
Lenfest, Edith May 
Long, Ralph Hamilton 
Lord, Charles Rogers, Jr. 
McCallister, Norman Smart 
McKenney, Lorna Mae 
Manser, Harriet 
Manter, John Tinkham 
Marston, Norris Lorenzo 
Mills, Virginia 
Mitchell, Elmer Lloyd 
Morse, Dorothy 
Moulton, Linwood Arnold 
Naylor, Phyllis Armitage 
Nute, Sylvia Clare 
Nutter, Irene Ada 
Ober, Willis Hutchins 
Parker, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Peck, Barbara Kingston 
Penley, Robert Irving 
Perham, Stanley Irving 



Pettengill, Frederick 

Bachelder 
Pitts, Loton Rogers 
Pitts, Lloyd Martindale 
Pratt, Helen Viola 
Rand, John Stanton 
Ratten, Ernest Walter 
Rovelli, Louis Kappel 
Rowe, Norman Eadou 
Royden, Clara Harriett 
Salter, Catherine Agnes 
Sampson, Clarence Evans 
Sauer, Martin Carl 
Scofleld, Orlando Francis 
Scolnik, Mollis 
Shapiro, Isadore 
Sinclair, Roy Leighton, Jr. 
Slattery, John Francis 
Smith, Pauline Audrey 
Sprince, Benjamin Oscar 
Stahl, Jeannette Olivia 
Stiles, Dorothy Vernon 
Stokes, Elizabeth 
Sylvester, Carol May 
Thomas, Howard Emery 
Thompson, Minna Josephine 
Titcomb, Beatrice Evelyn 
Tower, Mina Eliza 
Treworgy, Scott LeRoy 
Truell, Agnes Rosalette 
Turner, Paul Travels 
Underwood, Gladys Ethel 
Veazie, Nellie Helen 
Verrill, Martha Josephine 
Viles, Wallace Edwards 
Wakefield, Hazel Elizabeth 
Waterman, Audrey Geraldine 
White, Clayton Francis 
White, Florence Ernestine 
Wilcox, Luthera Ada 
Wilson, Hildagarde 
Wilson, Ruth Tllingworth 
Wong, Reginald Quong 
Woods, Mary Elizabeth 
York, Flossie Evelyn 



PAGE NINETY-FOUR 





F 



if 





K 



mem 



PAGE NINETY-FIVE 




mirror 




Class 1932 



President, Randolph WeatherbeE 

Vice-President, Carolyn Lane Woodman 

Secretary, Dorothy Hester Lawless 

Treasurer, Nathan Arthur Bucknam 

Yes, the baby is getting along fine. Why it seems only yesterday that he 
was creeping and crawling all over the place and now he stands up and walks 
alone. We are so pleased. 

Nineteen thirty-two, God bless them, are growing up remarkably fast. It 
is hard to believe that only nine short months ago they were such helpless things, 
wandering about the campus with their mouths open and their eyes popping, 
dodging the squirrels and Upperclassmen in their frenzied desire to escape the 
attention they were so badly in need of. 

The best of luck to vou, Frosh. 



PAGE NINETY-SIX 





Ifresfjman IPri^e Spiking 



The prizes this year were won hy Lucile Foulger of Ogden, Utah, and 
Randolph Weatherhee of Lincoln, Maine. 



programme 



"Painter of Seville" 

"Our Rich Heritage" 

"The Last of the Roman Tribunes" 

"What it Means to Believe in Man" 

"The Walker" 

"Education and Trade" 

"Song of the Market Place" 

"Protection of American Citizens" 

"Beau of Bath" 

"Woodrow Wilson" 

"Tell-Tale Heart" 

"World Peace" 

"Penelope's Christmas Dance" 

"I have but One Lamp" 

"The Creation" 

"The Defense of William Freeman" 



Leona Hall 

Leo J. Bujold 

Ruth M. Briggs 

Gordon W. McKey 

Edith M. Lerrigo 

Irvill C. King 

Annie V. Procter 

Harrison C. GreenlEae 

Elizabeth A. CorblEy 

Abraham Mandelstam 

Lucile Foulger 

Wendell A. Ray 

Ruth G. Brown 

M. U. L. Lightman 

Muriel M. MacLeod 

Randolph A. Weatherbee 



PAGE NINETY-SEVEN 




Class foil, 1082 



Abbott. Clark Luce 
Abbott. Clinton John 
Allison, Ernest Carl 
Austin. Shirlie Elizabeth 
Axtell, Robert Hopson 
Barnes, David Dwight 
Barrell. Ruth Elizabeth 
Bartlett, Howard Stanley 
Barton, Roger Daniel 
Bauchmann. Frank Walter 
Bean, William Benjamin 
Bernard, Albert. Jr. 
Best. Emily Elizabeth 
Bedell. Letha 
Blake. Marian Ella 
Blanchard. Violet Elinor 
Bliss. Muriel Frances 
Bohlin, Herbert George 
Bonney. Ravmond Francis 
Bowdoin. Janet Mabel 
Briggs, Benson Armstrong; 
Briggs, Julia Adelaide 
Briggs, Ruth Marjorie 
Broggi, Paul O'Connor 
Brown, Ruth Gregrory 
Brown, Theodore Robert 
Brown, Vesta Leodine 
Bucknam. Nathan Arthur 
Bug-bee, Orimer Ellsworth 
Bujold. Leo James Felix 
Bumpus, Madaline Louise 
Bumpus. Margaret Lillian 
Burke, George Anthony 
Burnham, Bernice Mabel 
Burr, Lewis Haskell 
Butler, Edward Irving 
Carroll, Russell Dudley 
Carter. Robert Lewis, Jr. 
Cave, Shirley 

Chapin. Milan Adelbert. Jr. 
Charneuse, Wadsworth 
Clapp. Waldo Arland 
Cohen. Augusta Gertrude 
Cole. Hewitt Norman 
Corbly, Elizabeth Ann 
Cousins. Rebecca Imogene 
Crandall, Thelma Utevee 
Critchell, Bertha Wilhemina 
Crocker, Frances Pulsifer 
Cronin, Frances Mary 
Curry, Constance Marguerite 
Curtis, Elizabeth Story 
Curtis. Regena Helen 
Cushing, Aubigne 
Day, Donald Samuel 
Demarest, Charles Truman, Jr. 
Dexter, Parker Jerome 
Diggery, Gertrude Jessie 
Dill, Carl Clinton 
Douglas, Norman Irwin 
Dunham, William Henry, Jr. 
Dustin, Elden Herbert 
Eliot, Richard Calder 
Erikson, Harry Emanuel 
Farrell, Sydney Warren 
Finn, Emily Frances 
Finn, Jane Elizabeth 
Fisher, David Gray 
Flaherty, Charles Foster 
Fortin, Prudent Maurice 
Alexander 



Foss. Helen Frances 
Foster, Carroll Benjamin 
Foster. Harry Kittredge 
Franklin. Benjamin Russell 
Fugre, Dorothy Grace 
Galley. Kenneth Taylor 
Garcelon. Earl Harrison 
Gibson, Ralph Stanley 
Oilman. Raymond Delmont 
Goddard. Gladys Viola 
Goodkowsky. Phineas Nathan 
Goodwin. Priscilla Davis 
Gordon, Maxfield 
Gorham, Amos Richmond 
Gormley. Thomas Joseph. Jr. 
Gottesfeld. Jeanette Lenona 
Gower, Alice Muriel 
Grant. Bernard Perle 
Green. Fred Leighton, Jr. 
Griffin. William Austin 
Hall. Kate Rebekah 
Harrington, Warren Alvah 
Hellier, Alice Elizabeth 
Henckel. Harold 
Hines, Margaret Elizabeth 
Hoag, Mary Frances 
Holman, Lyman 
Hooker, Charles Lloyd 
Howe, Althea Edwina 
Huntington, Kenneth Felix 
Ingalls, Joseph Carleton 
Isaacson, Eli Albert 
Jackson, Esther Fernald 
Jacobs, Clifton Wbittier 
Jacobs, Margaret Eleanor 
Jekanoski, Eugene James 
Jenkins. Arnold Milton 
Jones, Ernest Albert 
Jordan, Albert Dana 
Kaplan. Harrv Lawrence 
Kendall. Charles Pierce. Jr. 
Kimball, Dwight Willis 
King, Irvill Courtner 
King. Walter Landis 
Klain, Edward Bernard 
Knox, Ernest Wyatte 
LaBoyteaux, Robert 
LaFlamme, Henry Frederick 
Lake. Elwood Leroy 
Lambertson, Rosemary 
LaMontagne. Katherine Ilene 
Lary, John Stanton 
Lawless, Dorothy Hester 
Lerrigo, Edith Mary 
Lightman, Mashe Uda Labe 
Long, Charles Rushton 
Long, Ralph Hamilton 
McBride, Margaret Jane 
McCarty, Dana Lewis 
McCarty, Thomas Francis 
McCarty, George Stanley 
McCluskey, Ray Emmett 
McDonald, Norman 
McKey, Gordon Wells 
MacLeod, Muriel Mary 
Maclinn, Walter Arnold 
Maloon, Geraldine Louise 
Mandelstam, Abe Wallace 
Mann, Betty 
Mann, Parker 
Manson, Irene Angelia 



Manson, Robert Stone 
Mantelli, Elmo Peter 
Mardosa, Edward Peter 
Maybury, Franklyn Jones 
Mazonson. Morris Thornton 
Meader, Dorothy Mildred 
Merrill, "Walter Cushman 
Millen, Leonard 
Miller, Oscar Gustav 
Moller, Francis George 
Mooney, Doris Esther 
Murphy, Edward Everett 
Murphy, Joseph Francis, Jr. 
Ness, Robert Lawson 
Nichols, Rosamond Durrell 
Norton. Harold Gardner 
Page, Grace 
Paige, Howard Edgar 
Paa.uet, Victor Hugo 
Parker. Lawrence Craig 
Phillips, John William 
Plager, Abraham 
Proctor, Annie Viola 
Qualter, William Edward 
Ray. Wendell Augustus 
Renwick. Margaret Ward 
Reynolds. Richard 
Richardson. Merrill Everett 
Robertson. Mildred Beatrice 
Rohie, Eleanor Bradford 
Rogers. John Frank 
Ryan, William Thomas. Jr. 
Sahl. Herman 
Sawtelle. Hilda Emery 
Seigel, Elizabeth Pauline 
Shapiro. Harold 
Skreczko. Charles Kazmir 
Smith. Clyde Preston 
Smith. Iva Marian 
Sprafke, Bernard Nicholas 
Stanley, Edith Marie 
Staren, John 
Stevens. Frances Evelyn 
Stone, Christine Walker 
Stone, George Ellis 
Sullivan, Dorothy Frances 
Sutton, Gilbert Hobbs 
Swan, Charles Paul 
Taylor, Anne Elizabeth 
Tibbetts, Otis Benson 
Tibbetts, Vera Betty 
True, Kermit Raphael 
Valicenti, Peter Roger 
Vining, Mildred Enid 
Vosmus, Richmond Greenleaf 
Wakely, James Sidney 
Weatherbee, Randolph 
White, Benjamin Franklin, 

3rd 
"White, Gertrude Frances 
Whitten, Norman Earl 
Wiley, John Henry, Jr. 
Williams, Dana Sawyer 
Wilson, Geraldine Elizabeth 
Wing, Charles Walter 
Woodman, Carolyn Lane 
Worcester, Idabelle Conley 
Wright, Horace Albion 
Yates, William Henry 
Young, Gertrude Elizabeth 



NINETY-EIGHT 




PAGE NINETY-NINE 




j?»tuben:t (ffcruncil 

GDttictz& 

President, Royal S. Adams, '29 

Vice-President, Paul Chesley, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer , Charles C. Cushing, '30 



Member* 



William H. Bull, '20 
Frank F. Colburn, '29 
John H. Manning, '30 



John B. Cogan, '30 
Russell H. Chapman, '31 



Samuel M. Kenison, '31 
Roy E. McCluskey, '32 



Student Council has continued its splendid work in representing the men 
of the student body in the co-operative administration of students and 
faculty. Royal Adams has proven to he a most efficient president, and has 
most ably conducted the Student Assemblies, where the business concerning 
the whole student body is carried on. 

The avowed purpose of the organization is to secure co-operation in 
carrying out the general policy of the college, and to improve in general 
the conditions of student life. Through this organization are arranged all 
matters requiring the joint attention of faculty and students. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED 





Stubent (Sobcrnment 

GDiticng 

President, Florence M. Kyes, '29 

Vice-President, Constance Withington, '30 

Secretary-Treasurer. Mildred Beckman, '30 



Evelyn Webb, '29 
Eleanor Wood, '29 
Dorothy Nutter. '29 
Winifred Sanders, '29 



Stf*embcrG of Juotciarp Board 



Cleo Higgins, '29 
Faith Blake, '29 
Florence Pennell, '29 
Gladys Young, '30 



Florence White, '31 
Elizabeth Stokes, '31 



Student Government began officially in 1921 under Dean Nile's leadership. 
Since then it has become one of the most vital student organizations ranking 
with the Young- Women's Christian Association and the Women's Athletic 
Association. Business is carried on through the joint action of members 
of the judiciary board. Such business includes the adjustment of the fresh- 
men to their new college life, enforcement of college regulations imposed 
by the board, and above all, a fostering of the real Bates spirit among all 
the girls of the college. 

Our association is kept in touch with others by the attendance of our 
delegates at various divisional and national conferences. 

The board has carried on most efficiently this year its task of adjusting 
the new system of housing and house government. It is a delicate task, 
but it has been successfully performed. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED ONE 




Sire Commons Committee 



Chairman, William Howard Bull, '29 
John B. Cogan, '30 Rangnar G. Lind, '30 

Romeo J. Houle, '30 Russell H. Chapman, '31 

Roy G. Cascadden, '30 Tilson Peabody, '31 

Benjamin White, '32 

The function of the Commons Committee is to receive, entertain, and 
discuss suggestions in regard to the administration of the dining hall of the 
three lower classes. The committee meets once a month with the director 
of the Commons to consider the problems which arise. Criticism of the 
menus is heard ; the service and the general deportment of the dining hall 
are investigated, both from the angle of the student and from that of the 
director. The ideal is to achieve better co-operation between the students 
and the administration. The responsibility for maintaining an attractive 
place in which to eat rests jointly with the students and the director. The 
realization of this fact and the mutual attempt on the part of both elements 
concerned to make this ideal a reality will help immeasurably in making the 
Commons more than a "filling station". 

A three-piece orchestra composed of Rhoades, Small and Gormley furnish 
music at dinner. The new custom of having dinner at night has been tried 
and may become permanent if it meets with general approval. 

This year the Commons and Fiske Dining Hall have been under the 
direction of Miss Roberts. She has had many years of experience in dietetic 
work and there has been improvement under her control. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWO 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED THREE 





. c. %. 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
General Secretary 



New Students 

Pulicity 

Campus Service 

Entertainment 

Chase Hall 

Religious Meetings 

Voluntary Study 

World Fellowship 

Music 

Community Co-operation 

Deputations 

N. E. Field Council 



Officers 



Committees 



Paul Coleman, '29 

Harold Richardson, '30 

E. Eldridge Brewster, '31 

Prof. Karl S. Woodcock, '18 

Fred T. Googins, '27 



Charles C. Cushing, '30 

William C. Kilbourne, '29 

Livingston H. Lomas, '30 

Clifton L. Shea, '30 

Paul Chesley, '29 

Harold W. Richardson, '30 

Rangnar G. Lind, '30 

E. Eldridge Brewster, '30 

Gordon B. Small, '29 

Joseph Haviland, '30 

George W. Anderson, '30 

W. Howard Bull, '29 



aobisorp Boato 



Dr. George F. Finnie, Chairman 
Prof. Anders Myhrman 
Prof. George Ramsdell 



Guy V. Aldrich, '07 
E. Leroy Saxton, '15 
Edwin Adams, '19 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOUR 



The "Y" Cabinet for 1928-1929 started its year's work with a week-end 
retreat at Will's Cabin at Taylor Pond. Mrs. Wills has been very kind in 
lending her cabin for "Y" parties through the year. On this occasion the 
Cabinet members convened in excellent spirits, fresh from an enjoyable 
summer. Exhilarated by a cool dip and a full stomach the men willingly 
gathered around the fireplace to discuss the problems facing them, and to 
offer suggestions for an increased scope of activity in the work. 

Fred Googins, '27, who has succeeded "Rus" McGown as General Sec- 
retary, with his inimitable personality and clear thought removed the usual 
apprehensions entertained at the introduction of a new man into a new work. 
Immediately we knew we were going to like him and enjoy working with 
him — and we have. It was due to his fine business tactics that little time 
was lost in unnecessary discussion ; resulting therefore in the adoption of 
some very worthwhile policies. 

The first and most important of these was the revising of the Statement 
of Purpose of the Christian Association. It now reads: "The Bates 
Young Men's Christian Association is a union of the students and the faculty 
of Bates College for the purpose of promoting Christian Spirit on the campus 
through its fellowship and service". 

The second of these policies was the unanimous agreement to carry on 
the Wednesday night religious meetings. In most respects these meetings 
have been very successful. Harold Richardson succeeded in getting" the 
following speakers : President Gray, Dr. Finnie, Prof. Harms, Rev. Helsley, 
Captain Lawton, Prof. Crafts, Mr. Sheldon, Paul Alden and Prof. Myhrman. 
All of these men left some lasting thought with their audience. 

In the field of service we proudly catalogue the work of the following 
committees : Campus Service, New Students, Entertainment, Deputations 
and Community Co-operation. The chairmen of these committees have 
done a splendid piece of work. The figure of "Livy" Lomas standing behind 
a table in the "Y" Office, efficiently taking in and exchanging for cash second- 
hand books, will be remembered by many students. "Chuck" Cushing 
worked diligently on the reception of the new students. His efforts are 
worthy of commendation. We owe to him the success of the "Y" informa- 
tion tent, the reception of the Freshmen at the trains, the traditional I M U R 
Party and the Freshman Class Ride. "Cliff" Shea helped admirably in 
carrying on the Saturday night dances, a feature of our work that has a 
high social value on campus. George Anderson, with his deputation teams, 
has carried the spirit of fellowship and service into the hearts of appreciating 
country folks. "Joe" Haviland efficiently aided the Red Cross Association 
in their annual drive for membership. In the field of social service, he 
has handled isolated cases of needy folks in the town. 

Conferences have been liberally attended by Bates men. A large delegation 
was present at the Northfield Conference and also at the Mid-winter Conference 
at Poland Spring. Delegates to these conferences have returned with the hope 
that they might visit the next one. 

With the co-operation of the other Maine colleges we were able to bring 
two very interesting speakers to our campus. These speakers were part 
of a program in New England to bring to the local colleges authorities on 
various phases of international relations. Mrs. Huntington and Professor 
Latourette were received with great enthusiasm by the students giving 
courage to the instigators of this movement for its continuance. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIVE 



37&te t&&*- 





M. C. J. Cabinet 

<3Dtticn0 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Undergraduate Representative 

Committee Chairmen 

Religions Meetings 

Publicity 

Bible Study 

Music 

Conventions 

Social 

World Fellowship 

Social Service 

Industrial Girls 

Town Girls 

Finance 

Membership 



Frances Maguire, '29 
Muriel Beckman, '30 

Gladys Underwood, '31 
Velma Gibbs, '29 

Elizabeth Wright, '30 

Muriel Beckman, '30 

Dorothy Morse, '31 

Helen Holman, '29 

Yvonne Langlois, '29 

Helen Goodwin, '29 

Mary Pendlebury, '29 

Elinor Hernan, '30 

Mildred Tourtillott, '29 

Viola Zahn, '29 

Ona Leadbetter, '30 

Velma Gibbs, '29 

Elizabeth Wright, '30 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIX 



The Y. W. C. A. is one of the strongest and most influential of the student 
organizations on the campus. Perhaps many people do not realize just what 
the Y. W. C. A. accomplishes, some of them seeing its workings only in the 
Wednesday night meetings. But it goes far deeper than that. Through the 
Y. W. Cabinet, a group of girls representing the student body to carry on the 
functions of the organization, the Y. W. C. A. carries on an extensive program 
both on the campus and in co-operation with the city organizations. It does 
its bit in social service to industrial people in the city in supplying leaders for 
girl reserve clubs, in fostering Sunday afternoon sings and Vesper music, espe- 
cially at the Old Ladies' Home. 

Through the Wednesday night meetings, arranged for by the Religious 
Meetings Committee, Y. W. tries to reach the interests and needs of every girl 
on campus. The programs are made as varied as possible, with student speakers, 
faculty speakers, and outside guests, all combined with suitable music. This 
year the girls have done a fine piece of work in trying to make their program 
as interesting as possible. We have had wonderfully inspiring talks by Miss 
James, Prof. Walmsley, Dr. Finnie, Fr. Carter, and many others. The attendance 
of the girls, too, has shown that they were interested and appreciative of the 
efforts of the Cabinet. 

Not the least of the interesting jobs carried on by the Y. W. C. A. has been 
Freshman week. During this space of time in which the Freshmen alone are 
on campus, the Y. W. C. A. tries to make them feel at home here, to explain to 
them the traditions of the college, to show them the interesting things on campus, 
and to acquaint them with our Faculty and their wives. It is hoped that in 
this way every girl may learn to love the Y. W. C. A. and want to become a 
part of it. 

Y. W. C. A. has also carried on some interesting projects this year. The 
biggest one was the bazaar, successfully put on under the able leadership of 
Polly Davis. This time it took the form of a station waiting room. Travel 
charts, posters, lunch-counters, and trunks being wheeled noisely from one end 
of Chase Hall to the other, added considerably to the local color. Lolly-pop 
Day was another interesting and successful experiment. A booth was set up 
in front of Hathorn Hall, and lolly-pops were sold there all one day. If every- 
one didn't have one, it wasn't the Y. W. C. A.'s fault. The professors bought 
them too ! 

Under the leadership of Frances Maguire we have brought to a close another 
successful year for Y. W. C. A. We have tried to "follow the gleam" to the 
best of our ability, and now we relinquish our places to our successors, wishing 
them all happiness and success. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVEN 









A Scorch roke 



■*f W^d^Jjfc 4 




"* In action 




^9-wr 




"• Mu. Qren'+ we monks risaue? •" 





Won't- the.. 



mawe s 



ood husbands? l — > 



,7 Uio ToammQT 

Happy ho 1U " 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHT 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINE 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED TEN 




Cbe gates Stirrer 



^[f)e fetaff 



Editor-in-Chief 

Business Manager 

Associate Editors 

Assistant Business Manager 

Women's Assistant Business Manager 

Literary Editors 

Humor Editors 

Art Editors 

Society Editors 

Personal Editors 

Men's Athletic Editor 

Women's Athletic Editor 

Debating Editors 



James Nelson Solomon, Jr. 

Lawrence; Charles LeBeau 

Yvonne Langlois, Paul Chesley 

Gardner Alexander 

Mary PendlEbury 

Edna York, Philip Tetreau 

Ethelyn Hoyt, Lawrence Gates 

Eleanor Gile, Thurston Cole 

Faith Blake, Eleanor Wood 

Miriam McMichael, Howard Bule 

William Kilbourne 

Priscilla Lunderville 

Eugenia Southard, Walter Hodsdon 



The 1929 Bates Mirror is offered to its readers with the hope that they 
will overlook its defects and rememher only the sincere effort of its Editors 
to make it a publication worthy of representing the Class of 1929. 

We hope the student body will like it. We hope the Faculty will approve 
of it. And we hope that the many friends of Bates will consider it worthy 
of more than a cursory glance. It represents a genuine effort, and as such we 
offer it to vou. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN 



3Sfe* 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWELVE 




TO 



Cbe %ntts Stubent 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Managing Editors 

News Editor 

Literary Editor 
Athletic Editor 
Women's Editor 
Intercollegiate Editor 
Debating Editor 
Associate Editors 



Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Assistants 



Uty fe>taff 

Lawrence C. LeBeau, '29 

James N. Solomon, Jr., '29 

Rangnar G. Lind, '30 
Lauris B. Whitman, '30 

William C. Kilbourne, '29 

Edwin G. Milk, '30 

Charles C. Cushing, '30 

Faith L. Blake, '29 

Eunice H. McCue, '29 

Donald E. Strout, '30 

Frances E. Maguire, '29; Paul Chesley, '29; 
Catherine R. Nichols, '30; Dorothy M. Has- 
kell, '30; Dorothy M. Burdett, '30; Jeanette 
Cutts, '30; Henry A. Moultrie, '30; Mildred E. 
Beckman, '30; Muriel C. Beckman, '30; Con- 
stance S. Withington, '30; Howard E. Thomas, 
'31 ; Everett E. Cushman, '31 ; Edward E. Brew- 
ster, '31 ; George L. H. Kent, '31 ; Margaret L. 
Harmon, '31; Reginald M. Colby, '31; John L. 
Fuller, '31. 

Gardner B. Alexander, '29 

Carl L. Polini, '29 

David K. Spofford, '30 

Roberts F. Jackson, '30 



The Bates Student, of which the fifty-sixth volume has been printed this 
academic year, has maintained its standard of excellence. Under the efficient 
leadership of Lawrence LeBeau and his managing editor, James Solomon, the 
Bates Student has given us the news of our own and other campuses, plus 
interesting items ahout the professors and campus buildings. 

Some mention should also be made of the "Garnet" which has been 
carried on this year in connection with the "Student" under the leadership 
of Faith Blake, Women's Editor of the "Student". We have been very glad 
to have our literary magazine revived, and hope it will continue. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN 





§ates College ^Publishing ^ssorbtion 



GDttitttti 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Student Members 

Faculty Members 



Fred E. Hanscom, '29 

Faith L. Blake, '29 

Prof. R. R. N. Gould 

Frances E. Maguire, '29 

Norman L. Edwards, '29 

George W. Anderson, '30 

Mrs. Blanche W. Roberts 
Dr. Edwin M. Wright 



The Publishing Association has general control of all student publications. 
Under the direction of this body the Bates Student Board has been re-organized 
so as to meet and more efficiently handle conditions that have arisen due to the 
growth and rapid development of the Bates weekly. The new system went into 
operation this year with its first issue after the Easter recess. The new plan bids 
fair to bring about a more efficient division of labor and to assure to the Student 
the place of merit among other college publications which it has enjoyed in the 
past. 

The Garnet, a literary supplement of the Student, gives ample opportunity 
for those who would try their talents in this direction. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTEEN 





Jebattng Council 

Officers 

President, Walter O. Hodsdon, '29 

J 'ice-President, Eugenia M. Southard, '29 

Men's Secretary, John H. Manning, '30 

Women's Secretary, Yvonne L. Langlois, '29 

Treasurer and Coach, Prof. F. Brooks Ouimby 



Walter O. Hodsdon. '29 
Yvonne L. Langlois, '29 
Miriam E. McMichael, '29 
Eugenia M. Southard, '29 
Calvin J. Bassett, '30 
Mildred E. Beckman. '30 



Members 



Muriel C. Beckman, '30 
Robert N. Hislop, '30 
John H. Manning, '30 
Frank Robinson, '30 
Donald K Strout, '30 
Mildred L. Tourtlllott, ' 



30 



Clayton F. White, '30 
Lauris B. Whitman, '30 
Howard E. Thomas, '31 
Gordon B. Cross, '31 
Luthera A. Wilcox, '31 
L. Wendell Hayes, '31 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN 





Hint Debaters 



Again Bates has held its place of distinction in the debating world and has 
added twelve more contests to her long list of national and international dis- 
cussions. Questions of vital interest have been debated such as compulsory arbi- 
tration of international disputes, the protection of capital in the Caribbean by 
armed forces, the place of convention in modern life, the merits of advertising, 
and the problem of Trial by Jury. 

An innovation in the men's program was renewal of debating with Bowdoin 
College and with Carleton College of Minnesota. Once again the "Gentlemen 
of Oxford" came across the seas to visit and debate us here in America, and during- 
the same week Bates Round the World Debaters were meeting both Oxford and 
Cambridge Universities in England. The Oregon System was introduced for 
the first time on campus in intercollegiate debating and was enthusiastically 
received. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEE* 



25ates=fiDiforti dlnibcrsitp 

The season was quite fittingly opened with the international contest held at 
Augusta City Hall, Novemher 5, 1928. Oxford's representatives were: Allen 
Lenox Boyd, Dingle M. Foot, Malcolm Brereton. 

Bates was represented by Howard Thomas, '31, Frank Robinson, '30, and 
Walter O. Hodsdon, '29. The debate was a mixed team affair and Thomas, Foote 
and Hodsdon upholding the affirmative of the proposition, "Resolved: That 
this house favors compulsory arbitration", received an audience vote of 420 to 169 
for the opponent of the measure. Prior to the debate, the debaters and company 
were entertained at dinner in the Blaine Mansion by Governor Ralph O. Brewster, 
the chairman of the debate. 



T5ate$--tPttmont 

This debate on the question, "Resolved: That the trend of modern advertising 
is deplorable", held on the evening of November 19, was the first time the Oregon 
System of Cross Examination was used on campus. 

The speakers for Bates were : Samuel Gould, Clayton White, and Robert 
Hislop all of the Junior Class. No decision was made on the debate but the 
audience expressed itself in favor of the new style of debating. 



TSattfrgaU 

A team composed of Howard Thomas, '31, Randolph Weatherbee, '32, and 
Samuel Gould, '30, met the Yale speakers in Hathorn Hall on the evening of 
January 19, 1929, on the compulsory arbitration question. Yale was awarded 
three votes of the judges. 



T5ate$'9$atqutttt 

A new and inexperienced team represented Bates against Marquette on Feb- 
ruary 21, in a spirited discussion on the proposition, "Resolved: That convention 
is to be deplored." The negative of the question was upheld by Scott Treworgy, 
'31, Norman MacDonald, '32, and Bernard Krosnick, '31. This was a no decision 
debate. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 



^gmamm^fggmHmm, 




23at*3=Carlfton 

This debate, perhaps the most closely contested of the season, was held on 
March 25, 1929. Bates was ably represented by John H. Manning, '30, Randolph 
Weatherbee, '32, and Samuel Gould, '30, who upheld the negative of the proposi- 
tion, "Resolved: That the Jury System should be abolished." Carleton won by a 
2-1 decision of the judges. 

T5aU0-T5oston College 

On April 16, 1929, Norman MacDonald, '32, Walter O. Hodsdon, '29, and 
Samuel B. Gould, '30, journeyed to Pawtucket, R. I., to debate the advertising 
question with Boston College at the city high school auditorium. This was an 
exhibition debate and there was no decision. 



TSattS-TSotoboin 

On the evening of May 17, Bates sent a team to Brunswick and renewed 
debating relations with Bowdoin to the tune of a two to one victory. This 
is the first time in six years that Bates and Bowdoin have seen fit to stage 
a verbal fracas with the possible exception of those little arguments held 
in a more persuasive style which sometimes follow a football or hockey 
game. 

Bernard Krosnick, '31, Howard Thomas, '31 and Robert Hislop, '30 
all of whom have had previous varsity debating experience did the honors 
for Bates. 

The question, "Resolved: That the United States should cease to pro- 
tect investments in the Caribbean countries by armed force," is one which 
the men's team debated with the University of Porto Rico and the women's 
team with the University of Maine and the Connecticut College for Women. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN 





Wfii-amnx §ebattrs 



In this 1928-29 season, women's intercollegiate debating has enjoyed 
the most extensive and interesting schedule in its history. Our women 
have held their first debate with representatives of British Universities, and 
their second international debate with McMaster. They have also under- 
taken a tour which included debates with Smith, Radcliffe and Pembroke 
Colleges. 

W&t (Englislj SDebate 

Our first debate with English women took place in the college chapel 
on December 13, 1928. The debaters, Miriam McMichael, Yvonne Langlois and 
Eugenia Southard supported the negative of the question, "Resolved : That the 
disadvantages of co-education outweigh the advantages." They won an audience 
vote on the merits of the question. This was the first English women's team to 
debate in this country and the Bates debate the only one held in New England 
with the visitors. It is hoped that our women may enjoy more debates with the 
English, both here and across the sea. 

Wyt Cfllomen'S tEotir 

During a tour which extended from February 20, to February 24, a team 
composed of Miriam McMichael, Constance Withington and Eugenia Southard 
debated at Smith and Radcliffe Colleges on the negative of the question, 
"Resolved: That the trend of modern advertising is deplorable." The Bates 
women won the former debate by an unanimous decision of the judges; the 
latter was not decided. 

^fje Batn>=9?c9->aster SDebate 

At Hathorn Hall on February 28, 1929, Bates College, represented by Ruth 
Shaw and Gladys Young, debated McMaster University women on the ques- 
tion, "Resolved : That the Jury System be abolished." The Bates women upheld 
the affirmative and won by a unanimous decision of the judges. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY 



Delta Sigma |iba 

GDttictz& 

President, Fred T. Googins 

Vice-President, Abraham Feinberg 

Secretary, Marion Crosby Starbird 

Editor, Miriam E. McMichael 

Delta Sigma Rho is the national forensic fraternity. Bates has been 
granted a charter from this National Organization. Membership in the 
fraternity is honorary, and is open only to those who have finished their 
Junior year with high academic credit and have taken part in at least two 
intercollegiate debates. Those who wear the key of this Greek letter society 
have been distinctly honored. They have every reason to be justly proud, 
for their key signifies that they have won added honors for their Alma 
Mater. 

The following Seniors were admitted last year: Yvonne L. Langlois, 
Miriam E. McMichael, Eugenia M. Southard, and Walter O. Hodsdon. 

The following Juniors were admitted this year : Constance S. Withing- 
ton, Samuel Gould, Robert N. Hislop, John H. Manning, and Clayton F. 
White. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 



- *&■ . # '."JSP J&^P^ 




mt 




YES. WE REMEMBER WHEN PAUL LIVED HERE! 




THE FIRST CLASS BABY 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 





en's (Slee ffilub 



GDtticttg 

President, Gilbert R. Rhoades 

Manager, Lawrence LeBeau 

Director, Seldon 



T. Crafts 

Pianist, Carl Broggi, '30 



$®tmbtt& 



Gilbert Rhoades, '29 


Howard Bull, '29 


Rangnar Lind, '30 


Forrest Carpenter, ' 


Paul Coleman, '29 


Jerome Ottley, '31 


E. Allison, '32 


Edward Butler, '32 


Gordon McKey, '32 


Basses 


Baritones 


Lawrence LeBeau, ' 


Harold Richardson, '30 


Wendell Tetley, '29 


Harris Howe, '30 


Howard Page, '32 


Sam Kilbourne, '30 


Harold Henckel, '32 


Arthur Dow, '29 


Clifton Jacobs, '32 



2!> 



29 



First Tenors 
Livingston Lomas, '30 
Rushton Long, '32 
Walter Larkin, '29 
Tom Gormley. '32 
Irvill King, '32 
David Sprafke, '32 
Norman Cole, '32 

Second Tenors 
James Solomon, '29 
Fred Hanscom, '29 

Three years ago a Men's Glee Club was unknown at Bates, at least under 
that name ; there was only a Men's Musical Club, which included a Glee 
Club and an Orchestra. However, under the skillful direction of Prof. Seldon 
T. Crafts, the Club has taken root and has grown to be one of which Bates 
has no reason to be ashamed. This year, with a larger representation of 
students than ever before, the Glee Club is very well balanced. Its first 
concert of the year, given at the Gymnasium Cabaret, was received with 
great enthusiasm ; this serves as an indication that its engagements in the 
future should be successful and should add to the prestige of Bates among 
the citizens of Maine. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 





Cjre WlamtVLB <&ln Club 



GDttittt& 

President, Eleanor Wood 

Secretary, Joan LaChance 

Director, Proe. Seldon T. Crafts 



Elizabeth Crafts, '29 
Gwendolyn Blagden, '29 
Helen Holman, '29 
Florence Kyes, '29 
Lucy Lundell, '29 
Mary Pendlebury, '29 
Priscilla Lunderville, '29 
Erma Tetley, '29 
Eleanor Wood, '29 
Aurie Balch, '30 



Sternberg 



Elizabeth Clark, '30 
Althea Foster, '30 
Grace Hatch, '30 
Dorothy Hanson, '30 
Joan LaChance, '30 
Emma Abbott, '31 
Hazel Guptill, '31 
Nellie Veazie, '31 
Marion Blake, '32 
Marjorie Briggs, '32 



Ruth Brown, '32 
Aubigne Cushing, '32 
Helen Foss, '32 
Priscilla Goodwin, '32 
Muriel Gower, '32 
Katherine Hall, '32 
Margaret Jacobs, '32 
Muriel MacLeod, '32 
Davis Mooney, '32 
Gertrude White, '32 



We wish to present for your approval the Women's Glee Club and its 
director, Prof. Seldon T. Crafts, thirty willing song-birds and one courageous 
leader ! At the beginning of the year, only nine of the preceding flock re- 
ported at the old home nest, the rest had flown to other climes, but vacancies 
are soon filled in Birdland. Since one of the easiest things to do is to fall 
into a rut, birds seldom vary their calls, but this year we are proceeding 
contrary to all custom by twittering thru an entirely new repertoire. 

We cannot fly to every corner of the globe, but it is our hope and belief 
that our reputation, modestly enviable, will spread afar. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE 







tltt-tl^ 




&ht ©rnbic Sacietrr 

£>£ficetS 

President, Gilbert R. Rhoades 

Director, Prof. Seldon T. Crafts 

Librarian, Samuel Kilbourne 

Sternberg 

First Violins 
Louise Allman, '31 
Mervin Gottesfeld, '31 
Oscar Sprince, '31 
Hairy Barron, '31 
Walter Maclinn, '32 
Parker Mann, '32 
Lorna McKenney, '31 
Harriet Manser, '31 
Loring Blanchard, '30 
Charles Siegel, '29 

Second Violins 
Aurie Balch, '30 
Greta Thompson, '2ft 
Jeanette Record, '30 

The Orphic Society is, in every-day language, the Bates Orchestra. 
Although it is a young organization in respect to the number of years it 
has existed on the Bates' campus, nevertheless it is now recognized as one 
of the leading groups of student artists which are a part of our college life. 
Last year the Orphic appeared at Gardiner, Hallowell and Portland besides 
a number of times in Lewiston and Auburn. An excellent ensemble of 
instruments made up this orchestra and, although we miss several of its 
members, the incoming class increased the ranks to over thirty. This year 
the society has played with marked success on several important occasions. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 



Doris Mooney, '32 


Viola 




Norman Whitten, '32 


Samuel Kilbourne, 


'30 


Abraham Mandelstam, '32 


Cellos 




Clarinets 


uarbara Peck, '31 




Robert Axtell, '32 


Norman Cole, '32 




Cecil Miller. '30 


Bass Viols 




Doris David, '29 


Paul Coleman, '29 




Trumpets 


Dorothy Stiles, "31 




Gilbert Rhoades, '29 


Flutes 




Clifton Jacobs, '32 


Merwin Hodgkins, 


29 


Trombone 


William Kilbourne, 


'29 


Hey ward Higgins, '31 


Audrey Waterman, 


'31 


Drums 


Piano 




Clifton Shea, '30 


Miriam McMichael, 
Tom Gormley, '32 


'29 





She §attb 

GDitictz* 

Director, Prof. Seldon T. Crafts 

Student Leader, Gilbert R. Rhoades 

Manager, Eldridge E. Brewster 

Members 



Trumpets 
Joseph B. Topolosky, '29 
Gilbert R. Rhoades, '29 
Jacob Immonen, '29 
Otis B. Tibbetts, '32 
Clifton Jacobs. '32 
R. S. Carter, '32 
William Dunham, '32 

Clarinets 
Calvin J. Bassett, '30 
Cecil Miller, '30 



Robert Axtell, '32 
ft'ldridge Brewster, '31 

Drums 
Parker Mann, '32 
David Gathany, '31 
Clifton Shea, '30 

Alto Horns 
Loring Blanchara. '3u 
Richard G. Vosmus, '32 



Bass Horn 
Gardner Alexander, '29 

Trombones 
Heyward Higgins, '31 
Oscar Milter, '32 

Baritone 
Romeo Houle, '30 

Flute 
Merwin Hodgkins, '29 



The Band, although comparatively small at the beginning of this year, 
was reinforced considerably by members from the entering class. Under 
the skillful direction of Prof. Crafts, this group of amateurs was moulded 
into a unit with a high degree of competence and excellence. They per- 
formed at all the important athletic contests of the fall, and helped to instill 
into the student body a little of the Bates pep and spirit. The efforts of 
the Band should be appreciated and credited by the students, as is the 
service and conducting of Prof. Crafts by its members. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SEVEN 




£-K * w 




Winthxhm Club 



GDttittzg 

President, Priscilla LundErvillE 

Vice-President, Samuel Kilbourne 

Secretary, Doris David 

Treasurer, Livingston Lomas 



SlfJrmbftg 



Paul Coleman, '29 
Elizabeth Crafts, '29 
Doris David, '29 
William Kilbourne, '29 
Yvonne Langlois, '29 
Priscilla Lunderville, '29 
Miriam McMichael, '29 
Gilbert Rhoades, '29 



Gordon Small, '29 
Aurie Balch, '30 
Dorothy Haskell, '30 
Harris Howe, '30 
Samuel Kilbourne, '30 
Joan LaChance, '30 
Ona Leadbetter, '30 
Livingston Lomas, '30 



Harold Richardson, '30 
Clifton Shea, '30 
Louise Allman, '31 
Malvin Gottesfeld, '31 
Harry Green, '31 
Lorna McKenney, '31 
Barbara Peck, '31 
Dorothy Stiles, '31 



Organized in 1917, Macfarlane Club, named for Will Macfarlane, who 
was then municipal organist at Portland, has a membership of twenty-five 
students elected from the three upper classes. 

The officers have charge of arranging the program committees for the 
year, and each member serves at least once on this committee. "Con- 
temporary Musicians", "Band Music", "Current Events", "Folk Songs"_ and 
"Nature in Music" have been used as subjects for the regular meetings. 
Especially memorable have been the open meetings with Dr. Britain speak- 
ing on "Music and the Other Arts", Professor Crafts on "Schuhert", and Dr. 
Leonard on the opera "Der Meistersinger" ; the joint meeting with the 
Lewiston and Auburn Philharmonic Society ; and, finally, the banquet. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-EIGHT 





(College CJHrir 

GDttitttg 

President, Paul Coleman, '29 

Vice-President, Priscilla Lunderville, '29 

Librarian, Dorothy Haskell, '30 
Professor Seldon T. Crafts, Director 



Qfrtmbttg 



Arthur Dow, '29 
Walter Durost, '29 
Helen Holman, '29 
Gilbert Rhoades, '29 
Aurie Balch, '30 
Harris Howe, '30 
Samuel Kilbourne, '30 



Joan LaChance, '30 
Livingston Lomas, 
Harold Richardson, 
Emma Abbott, '31 
Dorothy Stiles, '31 
Nellie Veazie, '31 
Marjorie Briggs, '32 



Aubigne Cushing, '32 
'30 Edith Foulger, '32 

'30 Muriel Gower, '32 

Katherine Hall, '32 
Gordon McKey, '32 
Howard Page, '32 
Gertrude White, '32 



The College Choir, organized January, 1914, is one of the outstanding musical 
organizations on campus. Chapel services are made more pleasant by the choir's 
rendition of an anthem each Tuesday morning. At Christmas and Easter, musical 
services are arranged to which the public is invited. Professor Crafts deserves 
much commendation for his excellent work during his four years with the choir. 
He has developed and trained groups of fine singers. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE 





"" Bodu checking. 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE 




#.## #• W^^W^^Q^V^ 




Sobalitas iTatina 

GDttitttg 

President, Evelyn Webb 

Vice-President, Ola Coffin 

Secretary-Treasurer, Mildred Young 

9$tmbtt& 



Louise Abbott, '29 
Gwendolyn Blagden, '29 
Shirley Brown, '29 
Elizabeth Cooney, '29 
Mary Finn, '29 
Eleanor Gile, '29 



Libby Goldman, '29 
Helen Goodwin, '29 
Ethelyn Hoyt, '29 
Myrtle Huff, '29 
Lucy Lundell, '29 



Dorothy Nutter, '29 
Ruth Skelton, '29 
Eug-enia Southard, '29 
Alfred Whipple, '29 
Grace Young, '29 



i^onoratp Sternberg 



Professor and Mrs. Knapp 



To the Seniors who are interested in teaching Latin, the meetings of 
Sodalitas Latina offer an opportunity to discuss difficulties, methods and 
suggestions for their work. In addition, Miss Alley, from Edward Little 
High School, has heen a speaker; a play has been given, and papers have 
been prepared by the members on Virgil, Caesar, Cicero, the Value of Latin, 
the use of the bulletin board in the Latin class room, and the Virgilian 
cruise. "Latin Notes", a pamphlet with practical ideas on the teaching of 
Latin, is subscribed to and is available to every member of the club. These 
meetings have been successfully planned by Ola Coffin, the chairman of the 
program committee. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-TWO 




tx Jeutstbe herein 

GDttitct& 



President, Velma C. Gibbs 



Vice-President, Lawrence C. LeBeau 



Secretary-Treasurer , Frances A. Bartkus 



Martha T. Bassett, '29 
Faith L. Blake, '29 
Hazel B. Blanchard, '29 
Mary B. Briggs, '29 
Carlyss M. Cook, '29 
Ruby E. Daniels, '29 
Helen B. Holman, '29 
Mildred F. Mitchell, '29 



9?nttt>rrs» 

Mary M. Pike, '29 
Ruth E. Skelton, '29 
Greta C. Thompson. '29 
Viola G. Zahn, '29 
J. Stewart Bigelow, '29 
Charles Siegel. '29 
Francis C. Young, '29 
Ida Baker, '30 

honorary Sternberg 



Dorothy M. Burdett, '30 
Rachel M. Ellis, '30 
Fannie R. Levin, '30 
Grace M McKusick, '30 
Livingston H. Lomas, '30 
Harold W. Richardson, '30 
Clifton L. Shea. '30 
Daniel A. Stearns, '30 



Dr. and Mrs. Arthur N. Leonard 

The meetings of Deutscher Verein have been especially interesting and 
varied this year, and much praise is due to Mary Pike who has carefully 
planned the programs. On the first and third Mondays of each month the 
club meetings have been held. Talks were held on German customs, music, 
legends and contributions ; programs on Goethe, Schiller, Heine and 
other noted writers. The Christmas party of the Club is an event to which 
all its members look forward. A cabin party to Thorncrag was held in 
place of a regular meeting and was enjoyed by all. Dr. Leonard, Mr. 
Buschmann and Mr. Fehlan, pastor of the city German Church, have spoken 
at various club meetings. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE 




J)bi Sigma 3otn 



<2DUicct& 

President, Prof. Blanche E. Townsend 

Vice-President, Prof. Richard F. Mezzotero 

Secretary, Helen I. Goodwin, '29 

Treasurer, Charles v Siegel, 29 

SBrmbcrG 



Blanche E. Townsend 
Richard P. Mezzotero 
Mary S. Finn. '29 
Libby R. Goldman. '29 
Helen I. Goodwin, '29 



Frances E. Maguire, '2:i 
Dorothy Nutter, '29 
Evelyn M. Webb, '29 
William H. Bull, '29 
Gilbert R. Rhoades. '29 



Charles Siegel, '29 
Ethelyn E. Hoyt, '2!i 
Gordon B. Small. '29 
Cecile E. Veilleux. '30 
John H. Cotton, '30 



Kappa Chapter of Phi Sigma Pita was installed at Bates College in January, 
1929, by Dr. Henry Ward Church, national president of the society. 

Phi Sigma Iota is not merely "another Greek letter society". It was organized 
after several years of experimentation to fill a real need, and is a recognized asset 
to an>- institution in which it has been established. Its sole object is the 
reward and stimulation of a high grade of scholarship in Romance Languages 
and Literature. 

It has been conclusively proved that there is no more effective stimulus to 
better scholarship than the prospect of membership in an honorary fraternity of 
recognized ideals. Phi Sigma Iota not only provides such a reward, but thru its 
regular meetings provides an opportunity for individual scholarly work on the 
part of its members. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FOUR 





1£k petite %cKb£mu 



GDttitez& 

President, Dorothy NuTTER 

Vice-President, Charles Siegel 

Treasurer, Leslie Brown 

Secretary, CECILE VEILLEUX 

SBcmbrrss 



Howard Bull, '29 
Fred Hanscom, '29 
Gilbert Rhoades, '29 
Gordon Small, '29 
Wendell Tetley, '29 
Philip Tetreau, '29 
Frances Bartkus, '29 
Stella Bornstein, '29 
Shirley Brown, '29 



Ola Coffin, '29 
Helen Dailey, '29 
Helen Goodwin, '29 
Libby Goldman, '29 
Ethelyn Hoyt, '29 
Frances Maguire, '29 
Miriam McMichael, '29 
Winifred Sanders, '29 
Esther Sargent, '29 



Greta Thompson, '29 
Evelyn Webb, '29 
Mildred Young-, '29 
Louise Bixby, '30 
Dorothy Burdett, '30 
Jeanette Cutts, '30 
Frances Johnson, '30 
Ona Leadbetter, '30 



"Tout homme a deux pays, le sien te puis la France". With this idea 
in view it is the aim of La Petite Academie to inculcate in the minds of the 
members a real love for that which is French — a love for the creative art 
and the genius d'esprit of the French, a love for the French people, their 
language and literature. To accomplish this purpose the club invites out- 
side authorities to speak on the different phases of French life, literature 
and art. 

The meetings are well attended and interesting programs, in which the 
members take part, are presented. Nor is the social side neglected ; occa- 
sional parties are given, especially around Christmas. This year instead of 
the usual French plays a Mardi Gras carnival was given with great success. 

La Petite Academie is a real live organization and holds a prominent 
place among the various campus activities. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE 




fbii-iaicuc 



<2Dttittt& 

President, Walter N. Durost, '29 

Vice-President, Donald Strout, '30 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lucy Lundell, '29 
Chairman of the Program Committee, Hazel Blanchard, '29 

Chairman of the Entertainment Committee, Christine Burns, '30 



Sternberg 



Hazel B. Blanchard, '29 
Gwendolyn Blagden, "2y 
Ola G. Coffin, '29 
Amy Cleo Higgins, '29 
Walter Durost, '29 
Myrtle A. Huff, '29 
Lucy M. Lundell, '29 
Priscilla Lunderville, '29 
Ruth E. Patterson, '29 
Eugenia M. Southard, '29 
Edna B. York, '29 
Alfred Whipple, '29 



Grace E. Young, '29 
Mildred E. Young, '29 
G. Thurston Cole, '29 
Benjamin Gruber, '29 
Christine Burns, '30 
Hazel Chase, '30 
John Howard Cotton, 
Nancy Gould, '30 
Samuel Gould, '30 
Elinor R. Hernan, '30 
Lillian G. Hill. '30 
Livingston Lomas, '30 

^onorarp Sternberg 



30 



Beulah Page, '30 
Bernice Parsons, '30 
Harold W. Richardson, 
Ruth I. Shaw, '30 
Donald E. Strout, '30 
Louise Allman, '31 
"Victor Aronoff, '31 
Julian Dodge, '31 
Frederick Hayes, '31 
Martin Sauer, '31 
Gladys Underwood, '31 
Luthera Wilcox, '31 



30 



Prof. George M. Chase Peter Kesaris 

Mrs. George M. Chase Constantine Dukakis 

Programs have been arranged for the past year under the direction of 
Miss Hazel Blanchard, assisted by Professor Chase. 

The program allows for a symposium, and a reception for the Greeks of 
the city, or, as it happened during the past year, a reception tendered by 
the local Greeks to the "lovers of Greek" at Bates. The symposium took place 
in March at Rand Hall, with menus made in the form of owls, the symbol of the 
Society, and attractively printed in Greek. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SIX 





>p0ff0rb Club 



tiDttitttg 

President, Philip E. Tetreau, '29 

Vice-President, Lawrence C. LeBeau, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer, Dorothy M. Burdett, '30 



Sternberg 



G. Thurston Cole, '29 
Lawrence C. LeBeau, '29 
Philip E. Tetreau, '29 
Eleanor Wood, '29 



Edna York, '29 
Dorothy M. Burdett, '30 
John H. Cotton, '30 
Samuel Gould, '30 



John H. Manning, '30 
Edwin G. Milk. '30 
William T. Sinclair, '30 



In 1910, Professor Spofford of the English Department founded the Spofford 
Club, whose members have customarily been selected from the group of students 
who have displayed particular interest in creative English Literature. In years 
past, it has been the custom to hold weekly meetings of the club, at which meetings 
a program was offered consisting of original material, read by the members. 
Recently, the club abandoned the weekly meeting plan, in favor of a program of 
semi-monthly meetings. It is also the privilege of the Spofford Club to edit one 
issue of the Bates Garnet, in which are printed contributions of the club members. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-SEVEN 





Pen's politics GInb 



President, Howard W. Knight, '29 

Vice-President, Fred E. Hanscom, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer, Carl L. Polini, '29 

Members 



Forrest W. Carpenter, 
Gilbert L. Gates, '29 
James N. Solomon, Jr., 
Calvin J. Bassett, '30 



'29 Samuel Gould, '30 

Robert F. Jackson, '30 

'29 Samuel Blown. '30 

John E. Budding-ton, '30 



Charles C. Cushing, '30 
Harris W. Howe, '30 



Under the leadership of Howard W. Knight, Men's Politics Club enjoyed 
a very successful year. An unusually wide range of subjects in the field 
of government and economics was handled. Nicaragua, the Bolivia Para- 
guay boundary dispute, Limitation of Armaments, the Maine Supreme 
Court, Latin-America and the immigration quota law were the major ques- 
tions of discussion. 

For its open meeting which was well attended the Club had the privilege 
of listening to Scott Wilson, Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Judicial 
Court, deliver an interesting and informative address on the "Workings of 
the Maine Supreme Judicial Court". 

Through the kind invitation of Governor Tudor Gardiner, the Club spent 
an entire day at the State House at Augusta as personal guests of the 
Governor. Both the Maine House and Senate were visited while engaged 
in actual discussion and debate. Dinner was enjoyed at the famous James 
G. Blaine Mansion. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-EIGHT 





Women's ^politics Club 



GDtticttg 

President, Ruth E. Conant 

J'icc-President, Ruth E. Patterson 

Secretary-Treasurer, Doris Chick 

Faculty Adznsor, Prof. R. R. N. Gould 

Honorary Members, Dean Hazel Clark, Prop. J. M. Carroll 

Sternberg* 



Shirley E. Allbee, '29 
Doris Chick, '29 
Ruth E. Conant. '29 
Phyllis Misener, '29 



Ruth Patterson, '29 
Esther Sargent, '29 
Mildred Beckman, '30 
Muriel Beckman, '30 



Frances Johnson, '30 
Emma Meservey, '30 
Stella Schurman, '30 



The Women's Politics Club has as its aim the maintenance of an interest 
in matters of government and politics among- the women of the college. 
Membership is limited to a maximum of fifteen girls who have majors in 
the social sciences. 

During the first semester a series of discussions on the Caribbean Policy 
was held ; the second semester has been devoted to various topics such as 
the Cruiser Bill and the Kellogg Peace Pact. On March 18, Prof. Myhrman 
gave a very enlightening talk on the subject of the recognition of Russia. 
This meeting was open and well attended. 

The big event of the year was a trip to Aug'usta, taken in company with 
the Men's Politics Club, at the invitation of Governor Gardiner. This trip 
included visits to both houses of the Legislature, and to the Wednesday 
afternoon Committee Hearing. Luncheon was served at the Blaine Mansion. 

Altogether we have had a verv successful vear. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-NINE 





S^ambbn ^tpjja 



<3Dttictt<i 

President, Florence Pennell, '29 

Vice-President, Mary Elizabeth Roche, '30 

Secretary, Lorna Mae McKennEy, '31 

Social Chairman, Carlyss May Cook, '29 



$®tmbtt& 



Frances Bartkus, '29 
Gwendolyn Bladgen, '29 
Stella Bornstein, '29 
Frances Cobb, '29 
Carlyss Cook, '29 
Elizabeth Crafts, '29 
Helen Dailey, '29 
Mary Finn, '29 
Libby Goldman, '29 
Dorothy Lane, '29 
Florence Pennell, '29 
Ruth Skelton, '29 
Mildred Young, '29 
Ida Baker, '30 
Martha Briggs '30 
Rachel Ellis, '30 
Iva Foster, '30 



Helen Geary, '30 
Ona Leadbetter, '30 
Fannie Levin, '30 
Norma Merrill, '30 
Emma Meservey, '30 
Wilhelmina Perkins, '30 
Mary Roche, '30 
Cecile Veilleux, '30 
Gertrude Barrowclough, '31 
Laurianna Boucher, '31 
Kathleen Butler, '31 
Lorna McKenney, '31 
Irene Nutter, '31 
Catherine Salter, '31 
Dorothy Stiles, '31 
Martha Verrill, '31 
Audrey Waterman, '31 



Flossie York, '31 
Julia Briggs. '32 
Madaline Bumpus, '32 
Margaret Bumpus, '32 
Frances Cronin, '32 
Emily Finn, '32 
Jane Finn, '32 
Jeanette Gottesfeld, '32 
Margaret Hines, '32 
Katherine LaMontagne, 
Muriel MacLeod, '32 
Betty Mann, '32 
Margaret Renwick, '32 
Mildred Robertson, '32 
Eleanor Robie, '32 
Frances Stevens, '32 
Vera Tibbetts, '32 



'32 



Lambda Alpha has now passed its fourth birthday and is adequately 
serving the need of an organization for the off-campus girls. The club 
has this year sponsored numerous social activities as well as the annual 
"Campus Night", at which entertainment the several dormitories competed 
for first prize with original acts. The Rand Hall girls, with their stunt 
managed by Ethelyn Hoyt. won the cup. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY 




%Uthm 

€>fficcr0 

President, Catherine Nichols, '30 

Vice-President, LuthEra Wilcox, '31 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lydia Pratt, '30 

Faculty Ad-visors, Mrs. Fred E. Pomeroy 
Miss Mabel Eaton 



$$tmbtt& 



Shasta Allbee. - 31 
Aurie Balch, '30 
Gertrude Barrowclough, '31 
Mildred Beckman, '30 
Muriel Beckman, '30 
Cornelia Buckingham, '30 
Beth Clark, '30 
Jeanette Cutts, '30 
Louise Bay, '31 
Althea Foster, '30 
Harriet Green, '31 
Dorothy Hanscom, '30 



Lillian Hanscom, '31 
Dorothy Hanson, '30 
Dorothy Haskell, '30 
Grace Hatch, '30 
Mildred Healey, '31 
Emma Meservey, '30 
Virginia Mills, '31 
Catherine Nichols, '30 
Sylvia Nute, '31 
Barbara Peck, '31 
Wilhelmina Perkins, '30 
Lydia Pratt, '30 



Ruth Rogers, '30 
Dorothy Stiles, '31 
Mina Tower, '31 
Luthera Wilcox. '31 
Ruth Wilson, '31 
Constance Withington. '30 
Elizabeth Wright, '30 
Flossie York, '31 
Gladys Young, '30 
Helen Young, '30 



Alethea, an organization of Junior and Sophomore girls, has the two-fold 
purpose of promoting an interest in things literary and of providing oppor- 
tunities for social activities. 

The most interesting regular meeting this year was the discussion of 
George Bernard Shaw. The year's outstanding social event of Alethea is 
the banquet at Paradise Farm, held in place of the last regular meeting. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE 




C()T llorban: Scientific Sbcietfl 

flDCttcerg 

President, L. Kenneth Green, '29 

Chairman of Executive Committee, Theodore E. Field, '29 
Secretary-Treasurer, John M. Ness, '29 



John M. Ness, '29 
Theodore E. Field. '29 
Walter O. Hodsdon, '29 
Royal S. Adams, '29 
Ralph E. Giroux, '29 
Cecil F. Pooler, '29 
Pierce M. Maher, '29 
L. Kenneth Green, '29 



Sternberg 



Cornelius Turner, '29 
Joseph L. B. Topolosky, 
Henry C. Cullinan, '29 
Lawrence LeBeau, '29 
Allan L. Nash, '29 
Bateston Stoddard, '29 
Wedgewood P. Webber. 



'29 



'29 



Warren Turner Rowe, '29 



Charles Riley, '29 
Maynard Colley, '29 
Frank Panzarella, '30 
Stanley C. Fisher, '30 
Edward P. Scott, '30 
Fredrick Seeton, '30 
Alvord D. Stearns, '30 
Hildon M. Brawn, '30 



The Jordan Scientific Society was organized in 1910 in honor of the late Dr. 
Lyman Granville Jordan. The purpose of the Society is to stimulate scientific 
thought and activity aside from that required by the curriculum. Meetings are 
held twice a month during the school year. An attempt is made to secure speakers 
who are prominent and able to discuss present day points of interest in all scien- 
tific fields, with a view to keeping in touch with recent scientific developments. 

In accordance with the plan of putting on the Jordan Scientific Exhibition on 
alternate years, the society during the past year combined with the Ramsdell 
Scientific Society and the Lawrance Chemical Society in an exhibit of the work 
of all departments of science at Bates. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-TWO 





Mamsbcll Scientific SocietD 

Officers! 

President, Helen Sanders, '29 

Vice-President, Lydia Pratt, '30 

Secretary-Treasurer, Doris David, 

Sternberg 



'29 



Helen Sanders, '29 
Hazel Blanchard, '29 
Doris David. '29 
Florence Kyes, '29 
Carlyss Cook, '29 



Libby Goldman, '29 
Shirley Brown, '29 
Winifred Sanders, '29 
Phyllis Misener, '29 
Ethelyn Hoyt, '29 



Beulah Page, '30 
Lydia Pratt, '30 
Bernice Parsons, '30 
Mildred Tourtillott, '30 
Althea Foster, '30 



Ramsdell Scientific Society, named in honor of Professor Ramsdell, is 
composed of fifteen members, from the Senior and Junior classes. Each 
prospective member must be recommended by the heads of two science 
departments or obtain a double recommendation from one department. 
Meetings are held once in two weeks at which the members respond to the 
roll call with recent scientific facts. There is often a lively discussion. 

Papers have been prepared by the members on interesting phases of 
Physics, Genetics, Biology, Mathematics, and Public Health, with the par- 
ticular purpose of sharing one another's knowledge of special fields, as well 
as of discussing- scientific questions and facts of general interest. The pro- 
gram is varied by occasional lectures ; by trips to mills, hospitals and print 
shops ; by an open meeting at which Professor Ramsdell usually speaks, 
and by a cabin party in the spring. Professor Packard has spoken on food 
eccentricities under the title, "This Corn Beef and That Cabbage" ; and 
Dr. Lawrance on "Cellulose". The processes of spinning, weaving and dying- 
were observed in the course of a trip through the Cowan woolen mill. 

This year, in conjunction with the Jordan Scientific and the Lawrance 
Chemical Societies, the members put on the biennial Scientific Exhibition. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-THREE 





e Jfatoranre Chemical Snckirr 

Officers 

President, Carl E. Barnes, '30 

J'iee-Presidcnt, Edward G. Bilodeau, '29 

Secretary-Treasurer , Clayton F. White, '30 

fi^rm tiers 



Loring W. Blanchard, Jr., '30 
George Stanley Everett, '30 



Fred A. Gilbert, '30 
Guy S. Herrick, '31 
Cecil E. Miller, '30 



honorary fi^tmbrrs 



Walter A. Lawrance, Ph.D. Roscoe H. Sawyer, A.M. 



Anthony M. LaGasse, '29 
Roger G. Simard, '30 



Frank W. Lane, A.M. 



A new campus organization was formed in October, 1928, through the efforts 
of certain Juniors. The purpose of this organization, which was named the 
Lawrance Chemical Society in honor of Dr. Walter A. Lawrance, is to bring 
about an increased knowledge of chemistry, with special emphasis on current 
research publications ; to encourage original work on the part of its members ; and 
especially to foster a spirit of fraternal helpfulness not only while the members 
are in college but after graduation as well. Its members are chosen annually from 
the two upper classes, only those having a genuine liking for chemistry, intending 
to make it a life work, being eligible. 

The program for the year 1928-29 consisted of the delivery by some of the 
members of technical papers on recent research work ; addresses by several eminent 
outside speakers ; and the presentation of industrial motion pictures related to 
chemistry. In February of this year the first annual Exhibition was held at 
Hedge Laboratory where some very interesting and instructive experiments were 
performed. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FOUR 








Cosmos Club 



President, Fred DinglEy 

1 'ice-President, Viola Zahn 

Secretary, Martha Bassett 

Treasurer, Eldridge Brewster 
Chairman of the Program Committee, Fred Hayes 

9f?rmf)er0 

Iva Foster, '30 
Margaret Lancaster, '30 
Milton Liebe, '30 
Eelmont Adams, '31 
Eldridge Brewster, '31 
Esther Cook, '31 
Julian Dodge, '31 
Olive Elliott, '31 
Willis Hag-er, '31 
Fred Hayes, '31 
Henry Moultrie, '31 

The Cosmos Club was first organized in October, 1923. Before the year was 
finished, it had a membership of thirty-two students. The purpose of the Club 
was to aid these students who wished to enter some branch of Christian service 
to choose their work. Since then, the aim has expanded to include students who 
are interested in what is being done in Christian work, but who do not necessarily, 
expect to enter the ministry or mission fields. 

This year the Club has thirty-one members. The programs have in- 
cluded an initiation and a cabin party at Thorncrag and lectures on various 
subjects. Mrs. Induk Kim, a native of Korea, who is the travelling secretary 
for the Student Volunteers, spoke to us about her native land. Rev. Guptil, 
pastor of the Maine Seacoast Mission, told us about his work. 



Martha Bassett, '29 
Hazel Blanchard, '29 
Walter Durost, '29 
Lewis Gray, '29 
Helen Holman. '29 
Helen Hudson, '29 
Helen Sanders, '29 
Erma Tetley, '29 
Viola Zahn, '29 
Fred Dingley, '30 
Rachel Ellis, '30 



George Scudder, '31 
Scott Treworgy, '31 
Elizabeth Curtis, '32 
Regina Curtis, '32 
Muriel Gower, '32 
Esther Jackson, '32 
Edith Lerrigo, '32 
Geraldine Maloon, '3: 
Elizabeth Taylor, '32 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-FIVE 





(fitting (EM 



<3Dttittt& 

President, Paul Chesley 

Vice-President, Winter Sports, Reid Appleby 

Vice-President, Cabins and Trails, John Cogan 

Vice-President. Women's Activities, Ethelyn HoyT 

Secretary, Lawrence Gates 

Treasurer, C. Ray Thompson 

Faculty Advisor, Miss Constance James 



Paul Chesley, '29 
G. Lawrence Gates, '29 
Wed g-e wood "Webber, '29 
Royal Adams, '29 
W. Howard Bull, '29 
Stanley Snell, '29 
Ralph Giroux, '29 
Ethelyn Hoyt, '29 



25oarb of SDtrectord 

Winifred Sanders, '29 
Lucy Lundell, '29 
George Anderson, '30 
Charles C. dishing-, '30 
Reid Appleby, '30 
John Cogan, '30 
Rangnar Lind, '30 
Dorothy Burdett, '30 



Dorothy Hanscom, '30 
Samuel Kenison, '31 
Stanley Perham, '31 
Norris Marston, '31 
Russell Chapman, '31 
Dorothy Stiles, '31 
Norman Whitten, '32 
Nathan Buckman, '32 



The Outing Club has made special efforts this year to make all of its 
members realize that they have a place in the Club. The Board of Directors 
has worked energetically and sincerely to make the student body realize 
that the Outing Club is the biggest organization on campus. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SIX 



To start the year a picnic was held in the fall. Bonfires were built on 
the highest point of Thorncrag. Hot-dogs and marshmallows were toasted 
and eaten with doughnuts and cider. The half mile of narrow road through 
the woods at the end of the hike to the foot of the hill enhanced the pleasures 
of the supper. 

In the late fall the Thorncrag and Sabattus cabins were given a thorough 
over-hauling. Andirons, curtains and new kitchen utensils were installed. 
Later in the season a new phonograph was placed in the Thorncrag cabin. 

The Winter Carnival, under the competent chairmanship of Reid Appleby, 
Chuck Cushing and Johnny Cogan, went off smoothly and to the satis- 
faction of everyone. The weather helped out by giving us snow enough. 
The inter-mural events aroused considerable interest on Thursday and Fri- 
day afternoons. The Ice Carnival, with its band, lights and eats furnished a 
memorable evening. Saturday found all four of the Maine colleges com- 
peting for the Winter Sports Championship. Maine offered more compe- 
tition than usual and thus made the events more interesting. Bates Snow- 
men had no trouble in taking the Meet. The Carnival Hop held in Chase 
Hall furnished a fitting close for the mid-winter occasion and the tenth 
Winter Carnival went down in history as worthy of taking its place beside 
those of former years. 

Some stir was aroused early in March by the possibility of a winter trip 
up Mount Washington. An invitation was received from Dartmouth to 
accompany their club on such a hike. Although it proved impractical for 
this year it seems likely the plan may develop. 

Late in March the Outing Club again broke into prominence by staging 
a "County Fair" in Chase Hall. This supplanted the circus held for the two 
preceding years in the Athletic Building. It proved to be a novel and 
enjoyable occasion with side shows, nickel dances and all kinds of places 
to spend money. 

The major event of the spring program seems to be the long hike. 
Definite plans are not as yet settled. Sentiment seems to lean toward 
Katahdin. 

It has been the policy of the Outing Club throughout the past year to 
enlarge the scope of its activity wherever possible. It has felt that any 
activity affecting the entire student body was its business and has tried to 
be of service to its members in as many aspects of college outdoor life as 
possible. Any further extension in the future will be a step in the right 
direction. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-SEVEN 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-EIGHT 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE 




I I 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY 



(English i% f lagers 



<SDfticn& 

President, James N. Solomon, Jr., '29 

Vice-President, Mary Pendlebury, '29 
Secretary, Faith L. Blake. '29 

Business Manager, William H. Bull, '29 

Stagecraft Manager, Julius H. Mueller, '29 



29 



J. Stewart Bigelow, 
Faith L. Blake, '29 
Ruth G. Brown, '32 
William H. Bull, '29 
Dorothy M. Burdett, 
Paul Chesley, '29 
Elizabeth A. Crafts, 
Eeanor Gile, '29 
Samuel B. Gould, '30 
Raymond O. Hollis, '30 



30 



'29 



SBcmfacrS 



Nevel W. Huff. '31 
Rangnar G. Lind, '30 
Lucy M. Lundell. '29 
Miriam E. MeMichael, 
Edwin G. Milk, '30 
Dorothy Morse, '31 
Julius H. Mueller, Jr., 
Allan L. Nash, '29 
Sylvia C. Nute, '31 
Mary Pendlebury, '29 



29 



'29 



L. Rogers Pitts, '31 
Fred E. Seeton, '30 
Martin C. Saner, '31 
Paul R. Selfridge, '29 
Clifton L. Shea, '30 
James N. Solomon, Jr., 
Gladys E. Underwood, 
Hildagarde Wilson, '31 
Eleanor A. Wood, '29 



'29 
31 



honorary SBrmbrrs 



Professor Robinson 



Dorothy Stiles, '31 
Barbara Peck, '31 
Jeanette Record, '30 
Kathlene Butler '31 
Katherine Nichols, '30 
Constance Withington, 
Mildred Healey, '31 
Dorothy Parker, '31 
Fiances Cronin '32 



Professor Woodcock 



Mr. March 



Slpnttbrre of tfjc ^erlrrs Club 



'30 



Jeanette Gottesfeld, '32 
Frances Maguire '29 
Elizabeth Stokes, '31 
Lawrence LeBeau, '2 9 
Willis Furtwengler, '31 
Von Weston, '30 
Parker Mann, '32 
Ralph Long, '31 
Abe Mandelstam, '32 



Howard Thomas, '31 
Edgar Irving, '30 
Henry Gerrish, '31 
Charles Dwinal, '31 
Livingston Lomas, '30 
Wendell Hayes, '31 
Kenneth Dore, '31 
Harold Shapiro, '32 
Lillian G. Hill, '30 
Russell Edwards, '31 



The 4A Players have just finished one of the most successful seasons since 
their organization. For hesides producing at regular intervals plays of the 
usual high quality, several permanent improvements have heen made in the little 
theatre itself. Spot and flood lights have been purchased and extensive changes 
made in the stage and house wiring. The stage craft department under the 
direction of Julius Mueller, has done especially praiseworthy work. 

More than usual attention has been given this past season to enlarging the 
activities of the Heelers Club. This Club, so called, is a waiting list from 
which talent is drawn from time to time to aid in 4A productions. A careful 
record of credits and quality of work done is kept and on fulfilling the require- 
ments, members of the Heelers Club become eligible for nomination to the 
English 4A Players. 

The Varsity play was again sponsored by the Club this year and for the 
first time was presented in the Little Theatre rather than on a down town stage. 
Shaw's "Arms and the Man" was an unqualified success and the Bates Little 
Theatre goers were generous in their praise of the fine type of work done in 
its production. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-ONE 




Little Theatre 



programme 



November 1, 1928 

'Outward Bound" 

by sutton vane 



Hathorne Hall 



Mrs. Midget 

Scrubby 

Ann 

Henry 

Mrs. Cliveden-Banks 

Mr. Lingeley 

Tom Prior 

Rev. Duke 

Rev. Thomson 



Faith Blake, 

Samuel Gould, 

Mary PendlEbury, 

Paul CheslEy, 

Betty Crafts, 

Julius Mueller, 

Stuart Bigelow, 

James Solomon, 

Howard Bull, 



'29 
'30 
'29 
'29 
'29 
'29 
'29 
'29 
'29 



Produced by permission of Samuel French 



Coached by 
Stage Manager 
Lighting Effects 
Business Manager 

Little Theatre 



Professor Robinson 
Julius Mueller, '29 
Allan Nash, '29 
Howard Bull, '29 



Programme 



Hathorne Hall 



The first presentation of Outward Bound was given on consecutive 
evenings, December 1 and 2, 1927. The play, which was coached by 
Marion Garcelon, '28, then president of the 4A Players, met with such 
success that later in the year it was presented at Sanford under the auspices 
of the Sanford College Club. 

So many requests came to the 4A Players during the remainder of the 
season and the early part of last fall that it was decided to repeat the play 
this year. The play this time was under the personal direction of Professor 
Robinson who used the original cast in its entirety, and to whom a large 
measure of the play's success was due. 

The whole play was performed in truly professional manner, aided 
in no small degree by the splendid stage management which has character- 
ized the 4A productions this year. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO 



December 14, 1928 

"Trifles" 
by susan gaspell 
Henderson, the County Attorney 
Peters, the Sheriff 
Mrs. Peters 
Mr. Hale 
Mrs. Hale 



Martin Sauer, '31 

Von Weston, '30 

Faith Blake, '29 

Willis Furtwengler, '30 

Eleanor Wood, '29 



Coached by Stewart Bigelow, '29 



"The Falcon" 
by alfred lord tennyson 
Lady Giovanni 

Count Federigo Degi Alberighi 
Felippo, Count's foster brother 
Elisabetta, Count's nurse 

Coached by Mary Pendlebury, '29 



Dorothy Morse, '31 

Edwin Milk, '30 

Russell Edwards, '31 

Lillian Hill, '30 



"Grandma Pulls the Strings" 
by edith bernard delano and david cobb 
Grandma Blessington Frances Maguire, '29 

Mrs. Cummings, her daughter Constance WiThington, '30 

Hildegarde Cummings. her daughter Kathleen BuTlER, '31 

Nona Cummings Beaver Dorothy Stiles, '31 

Julia Cummings Ruth Brown, '32 

William Thornton Rangnar Lind, '30 

Coached bv Howard Bull, '29 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE 




% 102B farsitg flag 

Little Theatre Hathorne Hall 

"Arms and the Man" 

by george bernard shaw 

Produced under the direction of Alice M. Blouin 



W&t Cast 



Raina 

Catherine, Raina's mother 

Louka, the maid 

Nicola, the man-servant 

Bluntschlie 

Sergius, Raina's fiance 

Petkofif, Raina's father 

The Officer 



General Manager 

Stage Manager and Electrician 

Property Manager 

Costume Mistress 

Assistant Costume Mistress 



Faith Blake, 

Dorothy Morse, 

Lucy Lundell, 

Howard Bull, 

Stewart Bigelow, 

Martin Sauer, 

Raymond Hollis, 

Willis Furtwengler, 



Julius Mueller, '29 

Allan Nash, '29 

Fred Seeton, '30 

Eleanor Gile, '29 

Sylvia Nute, '31 



'29 

"31 
'29 
'29 
'29 
'31 
'30 
'31 



Selections from the Chocolate Soldier which was written especially for "Arms 
and the Man", were played by the Bates Orphic Society under the direction of 
Professor Seldon T. Crafts. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FOUR 



Little Theatre 



Hathorn Hall 



March 22, 1929 
"The Merchant of Venice" 

by william shakespeare 
Act I, Scene III. Street Scene 



Bassanio 


Rangnar Lind, 


'30 


Shylock 


Stewart Bigelow. 


'29 


Antonio 


Edwin Milk, 
Act III, Scene I. Second Street Scene 


'30 


Salanio 


Harold Shapiro, 


'32 


Sararino 


Parker Mann, 


'32 


Shylock 


Stewart Bigelow, 


'29 


Tubal 


Martin Sauer, 
Act IV, Scene I. Court of Venice 


'31 


Duke of Venice 


Howard Bull, 


'29 


Antonio 


Edwin Milk, 


'30 


Gratiano 


Charles Dwinal, 


'31 


Bassanio 


Rangnar Lind, 


'30 


Salanio 


Harold Shapiro, 


'32 


Shylock 


Stewart Bigelow, 


'29 


Nerissa 


Dorothy Burdett, 


'30 


Portia 


Ruth Brown, 


'32 


Tubal 


Martin Sauer, 


'31 


Clerk 


Kenneth Dore, 


'31 


Attendant 


Lawrence LeBeau, 
Coached by Stewart Bigelow, '29 
Act I, Scene II. Portia and Nerissa 


'29 


Portia 


Ruth Brown, 


'32 


Nerissa 


Dorothy Burdett, 


'30 



Act II, Scene I. First Casket Scene 



Prince of Morocco 

Portia 

The Train 



Bassanio 
Portia 
Nerissa 
Gratiano 
The Train 



Samuel Gould, '30 
Ruth Brown, '32 



Act III, Scene II. 



Second Casket Scene 

Rangnar Lind, '30 

Ruth Brown, '32 

Dorothy Burdett, '30 

Charles Dwinal, '31 



Coached by Betty Crafts, '29 



Costume Mistress 
Assistant Costume Mistress 
Stagecraft Director 
Assistant Stagecraft Director 



Eleanor Gile, '29 

Sylvia Nute, '31 

Julius Mueller, '29 

Fred Seeton, '30 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-FIVE 




Go 



Little Theatre Hathorn Hale 

by channing pollock 

Directed by J. Stewart Bigelow, '29 

On the evening of May second the 4A Players concluded their 1928-29 

season with the presentation of Pollock's four-act play, "The Enemy". The play, 

although an unusually difficult one to stage successfully, was particularly well 

done. Both press and campus critics were liberal in their praise of the work 

of both cast and staff. 



W$t Cast 



Pauli Arndt 
Carl Behrend 
Professor Arndt 
August Behrend 
Bruce Gordon 
Mizzi Winckelman 
Fritz Winckelman 
Baruska 
Jan 



<&\)c §)taff 



Stagecraft Manager, 
Assistant Stagecraft Manager 
Lighting Effects 
Costume Mistress 
Scenery Painting 



Mary PendlEbury, '29 

James Solomon, '29 

Howard Bull, '29 

Martin Sauer, '31 

Rangnar Lind, '30 

Faith Blake, '29 

Edwin Milk, '30 

Elizabeth Crafts, '29 

Stewart Bigelow, '29 

Julius Mueller, '29 

Fred Seeton, '30 

Allan Nash, '29 

Sylvia Nute, '31 

Thurston Cole, '29 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SIX 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-SEVEN 








|ttbleitt Council 



flDCficfrg 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Royal S. Adams 

Paul CheslEy 

Oliver F. Cutts 



fltfjletic €oumil 



President 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Faculty Members 

Oliver F. Cutts 
Carleton L. Wiggin 
C. Raymond Thompson 
George E. Ramsdell 



L. E. Moulton 
Oliver F. Cutts 



Alumni Members 
L. E. Moulton 
Dr. L. P. Gerrish 
Dr. E. V. Call 
T. S. Seavey 



Student Members 
Royal S. Adams 
Paul Chesley 
W. Howard Bull 
Roy G. Cascadden 
Harold W. Louder 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-EIGHT 





OLIVER F. CUTTS 

PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 




CARLETON L. WlGGIN 

COACH OF BASEBALL 
HOCKEY AND FOOTBALL 



Dates doacbes 





C. RAY THOMPSON 

COACH OF 

WINTER SPORTS AND TRACK 



REGINALD H. THRELFALL 

ASSISTANT COACH. FOOTBALL 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE 






^T 



ill 



Uarsitn Club 

flDfficrrg 

President, Stanley F. Snell, '29 

Vice-President, James G. Cole, '29 

Secretary, Paul CheslEy, '29 

Treasurer, Reid S. Appleby, '30 

The Varsity Club is one of the most co-operative and influential clubs on 
campus. It is an exclusive club ; to be admitted the college letter must be won, 
and a public and private initiation undergone. This year's membership totaled 
sixty-five. 

During this past year the club has continued with its enthusiastic work; 
football rallies were held, and the "Back to Bates" night, held before the Bowdoin 
game, was very successful. 

Through the kindness of Philip Annas, '28, the club is the proud possessor 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY 



of a bobcat which has been stuffed and is now on exhibition in Chase Hall — 
since that is the only place for him until the new Varsity Club room in the Athletic 
building has been completed. The entire club is gratified that the Varsity Club 
has the possession of this college totem. 

This club set aside February 21 and 22 as sub-freshmen week. About thirty 
prominent, and we hope future Bates, athletes were our guests. This is probably 
the last so-called sub-freshmen week as next year the organization will take charge 
of smaller groups at a time under the impression that more can be accomplished 
in this manner. 

The annual Interscholastic Basketball Tournament was held in iour 
new gym. The burden of the work fell upon the Varsity Club. The event 
was run off smoothly and satisfactorily to all. The club received many 
congratulations for its fine work from officials, coaches, newspaper men, 
and the players competing. 

The club feels sorry to lose one of its best friends, Coach Wiggin. A 
banquet was held in his honor at Chase Hall on May 10. Many alumni and 
friends of Wig were present on the invitation of the club. A bronze statue 
of a coach was presented to Wig as a testimonial of our "Confidence" in 
him, his "Loyalty" and with our best "Wishes" for him in his new field of 
activity. At this same banquet Reggie Threlfall was also remembered. The 
club certainly will miss the fine spirit shown by these men both to us 
individually and as a club. 

Every June the club handles the annual Interscholastic Track Meet held 
on our playground. This is the crowning event of the season's program. 

The following men have completed their athletic career and will now 
be passive but not disinterested members: Snell, Chesley, Cole. Adams, 
Giroux, Nilson, Daigle, Lane, Malia, Maher, Turner, Gates, Topolosky, 
Pooler, Coy, Jmmonen, Jewell, Colburn, Tetley, Knight, Webber and 
Alexander. In spite of this great loss in membership the Varsity Club 
next year should be very powerful and capable of handling the tasks that 
grow steadily every year. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-ONE 




fetter Heir 

.football 

G. Lawrence Gates, '29 
Morris H. Secor, '30 
David K. Spofford, '30 
Harold W. Louder, '30 
Reid S. Appleby, '30 
Clarence R. Anthony, '30 
Levite Lizotte, '30 

Cro£>3=Countrp 

H. Ellsworth Hobbs, '31 
Willis J. Furtwengler, '31 
Stuart W. Jones, '31 

\ifOCfef? 

John B. Cogan, '30 
Morris H. Secor, '30 
H. Charles Anderson, '30 
G. H. Johnson, Jr., '30 

WUtntrt fepottg 

I). Alvord Stearns, '30 
Judson C. Gerrish, '30 
Franklin E. Burris, '31 

'Eracfe 

Royal S. Adams, '29 Romeo J. Houle, '30 

Paul Chesley, '29 Flavins B. Hubbard, '30 

Raymond E. Nilson, '29 Russell H. Chapman, '31 

Ralph E. Giroux, '29 Wallace E. Viles, '31 

Chadbourne R. Knowlton, '30 Stuart W. Jones, '31 



Raymond E. Nilson, '29 
Stanley F. Snell, '29 
Eloi R. Daigle, '29 
Frank F. Colburn, Jr., '29 
Pierce M. Maher, Jr., '29 
Earl Hutchinson, '29 
E. E. Jewell, '29 



Paul Chesley, '29 
Charles C. dishing, '30 
Russell H. Chapman, '31 



Cecil F. Pooler, '29 
Pierce M. Maher, '29 
Joseph B. Topolosky, '29 
Francis Malia, '29 



Jacob J. Immonen, '29 
Levite Lizotte, '30 
Cecil E. Miller, '30 



George P. Carnie, '30 
Samuel M. Kenison, '31 
John L. Fuller, '31 
Benjamin Bornstein, '31 
Solomon B. Johnson, '31 
G. Hartly Curtis, '29, Mgr. 



Wallace E. Viles, '31 
Raymond W. Coy, '29, Mgr. 



Sidney W. Farrell, '32 
Howard W. Knight, '29, Mgr. 



Benjamin Chick, '31 
Norman E. Whitten, '32 



Carl C. Dill, '32 
Ernest W. Knox, '32 
Norman E. Whitten, '32 
VVedgewood P. Webber, '29 
Manager 



Clifton W. Jacobs, '32 



tennis 

Gardiner B. Alexander, '29, Mgr. 



James G. Cole, '29 
Cornelius Turner, '29 
G. Delmont Luce, '29 
Ralph E. Giroux, '29 



Baseball 

Cecil F. Pooler, '29 
Roy G. Cascadden, '30 
Norris L. Marston, '31 
Charles F. Flaherty, '32 



Theodore R. Brown, '32 
Raymond D. Gilman, '32 
Abraham Plager, '32 
Wendell W. Tetley, '29, Mgr. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO 





CAPTAIN, RAYMOND E. NILSON 



Juottmll 




MANAGER. GEORGE H. CURTIS 
PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-THREE 



Ht^OI* 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FOUR 




Jfootball 

GDttittt* 

Captain, Raymond E. Nilson, '29 

Manager, G. Hartley Curtis, '29 

Assistant Manager, Clifton L. Shea, '30 

Coach, CarlETon L. Wiggin, Bates, '21 

Assistant Coach, Reginald H. Threleall, Purdue, '27 



Left End Samuel Kenison, '31 

Left Tackle Raymond Nilson, '29 

Left Guard Stanley Snell. '29; Eloi Daigle. '29 

Center Harold Louder. '30; Frank Colburn, '29 

Right Guard Reid Appleby, '30; Levite Lizotte, '30 

Right Tackle Clarence Anthony, '30 

Right End John Fuller, '31 ; Ezekiel Jewell, '29 

Quarterback Benjamin Bornstein, '31 ; George Carnie, '30 

Halfback David Spokford, '30; Solomon Johnson, '31 

Halfback Morris Secor, '30; Lawrence Gates, '29 

Fullback Pierce Maher, '29; Earl Hutchinson, '29 

The football season of 1928 was one of the most unsuccessful ones ever 
passed thru by a Bates team. They started the season with a squad strong 
in linemen though somewhat weak in backs, and bright things were hoped 
for by the Garnet supporters but the team never seemed to get going. Their 
greatest difficulty seemed to be a lack of oftensive ability when scoring 
opportunities presented themselves. Time and time again they made long 
drives toward the enemy goal only to be thwarted on the ten or fifteen- 
yard line. This difficulty was especially noticeable in the Colby game. It 
is useless to attempt to offer any alibis. The season was, it is hoped in more 
ways than one, a culmination of several disastrous years. 

U!Xt&\tvan 14 Bates 

The season opened at Middleton, Conn., with a defeat at the hands of 
Wesleyan. During the first part of the game the Garnet seemed to be having 
the upper hand but a fumble gave Wesleyan the first score when Peck 
scooped it up and ran about half the length of the field. Throughout the 
game the home team gained consistently on exchanges of punts and a par- 
ticularly favorable exchange put the Wesleyan outfit in position to score its 
second touchdown which came in the third quarter. Coach Wiggin's in- 
experienced backfield showed a lot of punch at times during the contest and 
Secor made some particularly good gains. Captain Nilson and Appleby 
were the outstanding line performers for Bates. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-FIVE 



SBass. "SLssie**' <3 Bates o 

The second game of the season was a hard fought battle with the Mass. 
"Aggies" in which the farmers were victorious by the closest of margins. 
The only score of the game came early in the fourth quarter when the Bates 
line weakened after a goal line stand and allowed the Aggie back to slip 
across the line. The outstanding player of the game was Anthony, the giant 
Bates tackle, who broke through and smeared plays many times. In the 
backfield, the work of Secor, the remodeled end, featured. The Massachu- 
setts boys were a hard fighting aggregation and well deserved their victory. 

^Tufts 13 Bates 

"Fish" Ellis and undefeated Jumbos were the next to take the Bates 
scalp but they did it only after the hardest sort of a battle. During the 
first quarter the home team seemed to have the upper hand and with Sol 
Johnson bearing the brunt of the attack, made considerable headway 
through the Tufts line. But in the second quarter following an exchange 
of punts which favored them, Tufts started a march to the Bates goal line 
with Ellis making most of the gains. This individual gave one of the best 
exhibitions of ball carrying ever seen on Garcelon Field. Secor's fumble 
paved the way to the second touchdown. In the closing period Bates seemed 
well on the way to a touchdown when Bornstein by a clever bit of broken 
field running took a punt and carried the ball seventy-five yards before 
being forced out of bounds. A grounded forward pass over the goal line 
ended this scoring chance. 

Boston CUnibcrsttp 7 Bates 

In a game featured by the stubborn defenses of the two teams, B. U. 
nosed out the Garnet eleven. The Hub eleven finding the Bates line hard 
to pierce resorted to an air attack which culminated in the only score of 
the game in the second period. In the first period Boston University failed 
to score by less than a foot after making a first down on the three yard 
line. "Bunny" Bornstein again contributed his thrill to the game when in 
the last quarter he returned a punt forty yards, a feat which was marred 
by a fumble when he was finally tackled. The Bates offense was very weak 
in this game and at no time did they penetrate the enemy territory to any 
depths. The game was the first to be played on the new home field of 
Boston University. 

S^attu 47 Bates 

For the third year in succession Fred Brice's Maine team completely 
overwhelmed Bates. In the first period the Orono outfit was held in some 
semblance of check but after that the home team cut loose with everything 
they had which was considerable. With Buzzel, Coltart leading the parade, 
they swept down the field five times for scores in the last half. The Maine 
team never worked with more precision and dispatch than it did then. The 
line simply opened large holes and the backs galloped through leaving most 
of the tackling to be done by the secondary defense men. There is little 
to be said for the Bates team unless it is the last minute drive which they 
made to the Maine five yard line. At this time both teams were composed 
almost completely of substitutes. Zakarin played a brilliant game at center 
for Maine. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SIX 




1 



250toboin 12 Bates 

On the Saturday following the Maine game the Bobcat showed a complete 
reversal of form when it entertained Bowdoin on Garcelon Field. At the 
end of a fierce struggle played in mud, ankle deep, and during a heavy down- 
pour the Polar Bears were extremely fortunate to emerge the victors by two 
touchdowns. The first touchdown came late in the first quarter when 
Bowdoin took the ball on downs at about mid-field and carried it to the 
seven-yard line. Here Foster fumbled when he was tackled after making a 
short gain and Stiles dove through the mud and slid across the line. The 
second half had a very decided Garnet tinge. Johnson and Secor were 
consistent in their ability to gain except when a touchdown seemed imminent. 
With darkness falling rapidly and Bates battling desperately to tie the score, 
Bowdoin took advantage of a second lucky break to put the game on ice. 
Johnson had crashed through the line and was making his way through 
the Bowdoin secondary defense men when the ball bounced out of his hands 
and landed in the arms of Braman, who raced over the goal line unmolested. 

The Wigmen then carried the ball to the two-yard line where the Bowdoin 
line stiffened and the game was over. 

€o\bv 26 Bates 

Scoring in every quarter Colby emerged the victor in the last game of 
the season. The score of 26 to in no way indicates the fierceness of the 
struggle. The big noise in the Mule's attack was Wally Donovan who in 
the opening period ran seventy yards to score and repeated his performance 
in the closing canto. The first score came with disheartening quickness 
after the opening whistle but the Bobcats came back and carried the ball 
to the Colby twenty-yard line before the period ended. At the opening of 
the second period when the visitors sent Scott over the line after a sustained 
march down the field and once more the Garnet carried the ball deep into 
the enemy territory only to lose it again. Several long runs by Scott and 
Donovan gave Colby their third touchdown. An intercepted pass on the 
twenty-eight-yard line stopped the next drive by the Wigmen and on the 
next play Donovan worked himself loose and completed the scoring for the 
day. Some evidence of the struggle which ensued is seen by the fact that 
Colby made sixteen first downs against nineteen for Bates. Sol Johnson 
was the most consistent ground gainer for the losers. Maher also did some 
very effective work along this line. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-SEVEN 



£ t^i2^9* 





Jfresbrmw ifootball 



Coach Finn's Garnet Cubs won only one of the five games which they 
played but they held their own against the strongest prep schools of Maine. 
The team was captained by Francis Moller, a former Manchester High star. 

Opening their season against Hebron they were defeated by a score of 
12 to 0. They held the prep school boys, admittedly one of the strongest 
secondary outfits in New England, scoreless in the first half. In the third 
quarter Dwyer and Hart crossed the line and the closing period was scoreless. 

The following week the frosh and Bridgton Academy battled through 
four scoreless periods. The feature of the game was the last minute stand 
made by the freshmen on their four-yard line. The rest of the game was 
a rather uninteresting mid-field struggle. 

A blocked kick in the closing minutes of play spelled defeat for the 
freshmen in the Kents Hill game. The visitors presented a heavy, rugged 
team and the Bates team was unable to make much headway against them. 

The team won its first game against M. C. I. by the score of 21 to 20. 
The Pittsfield boys were light but extremely aggressive and came back to 
tie the score twice after the freshmen had taken the lead and finally to snatch 
the lead themselves only to lose it in the last minute or two of play. 

The following were awarded numerals : Ends, Mazonson, Moller, E. Murphy, 
J. Murphy; tackles, Ryan and White; guards, Allison, Broggi, Long, Mardossa ; 
center, Gorham ; quarterback, Mantelli ; halfbacks, Charneuse, Flaherty, 
Knox, Plager ; fullback, Brown. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-EIGHT 




OJrflBB-Gfnuntry 




CAPTAIN. PAUL CHESLEY 
MANAGER. RAYMOND W. COY 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-NINE 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY 




Cross-CaitntrD 

Go 

GDtticttg 

Captain, Paul Chesley, '29 

Manager, Raymond W. Coy, '29 

Coach, C. Ray Thompson, Bates, '13 



Willis Furtwengler, '31 
Ellsworth Hobbs, '31 
Russell Chapman, '31 



Paul Chesley, '29 
Charles Cushing, '30 
Wallace Viles, '31 
Stewart Jones, '31 

Wit 'Eufts Street 

Coach Thompson inaugurated his career as track coach by sending his 
pupils to a decisive victory against Tufts in a meet run over the local course. 
Chesley, Viles and Hobbs breasted the tape together after leading the pack 
over the entire distance. Hickey of Tufts saved his team from a complete 
shutout by finishing in fourth place but the rest of the Bates men had finished 
before another Tufts man appeared with Chapman and Furtwengler tying 
for fifth and Hayes and Cushing tying for seventh. The score was 17 to 46. 

<&%t Sterne 99fft 

On November 2 the Garnet tasted the bitter dregs of defeat at the hands 
of Chester Jenkin's University of Maine outfit. By finishing seven men with- 
in the first nine the Pale Blue harriers won by a large score of 17 to 44. Rich- 
ardson and Lindsey did the expected when they lopped across the line in 
a dead heat. Ellsworth Hobbs was the first Bates man to finish. He and 
Chesley finished fifth and sixth. Viles, one of the Garnet's outstanding 
hopes, had the misfortune to trip over one of the hurdles and the bruising' 
and shaking up which he received probably cost Bates a third place. The 
rest of the team finished in tenth, eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth positions. 

Surprising even their most ardent supporters, the team finished with the 
low score of 65 to take third place in the New Englands held at Franklin 
Park, Boston. As was expected Maine won the meet with a score of 46 
followed by New Hampshire with 53. Hobbs ran the best race of his career 
to take sixth place. Chapman finished tenth, Furtwengler fourteenth, Jones 
seventeenth and Cushing eighteenth. Viles ran himself out in an attempt 
to stay with the leaders. 

The first ten finished as follows: 
1 Richardson and Lindsey, tied for 6 
first 7 

3 Benedict, New Hampshire 8 

4 Howard, New Hampshire 9 

5 Stinson, Maine 10 
The teams finished in the 



Hobbs, Bates 
Cahalan, New Hampshire 
Plazen, New Hampshire 
Hickey, Tufts 
Chapman, Bates 



following order: Maine, New Hampshire, 
Bates, Williams, M. I. T., Tufts, Holy Cross, Amherst, M. A. C, North- 
eastern and Boston University. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-ONE 




til l 't^t*" 1 




Jfresbman Cross-CoitntrD 



The Freshmen turned in a very credible season in cross-country. The 
opening call for candidates found but two or three experienced competitors 
answering. Their schedule was an unusually short one and only two meets 
were held. Howard Bartlett, the former Huntington School star, was 
captain. 

On November 6 they were easy victors over Bridgton Academy by a score of 
19 to 38. Bartlett, Cole and Whitten of the yearlings tied for first followed by 
Bonney in fourth place. The scoring was completed by Skreczko in ninth place. 
Had not the prep school boys been forced to run without their captain, 
Johnson, the score might have been somewhat closer. 

Competing at the New Englands the Freshmen finished in third place 
with a score of 66 points. The University of New Hampshire was first 
with 53 points followed by Maine with 62 points. Norman Cole and Norman 
Whitten finished 4th and 5th and Bartlett crossed the line in 8th place. 
Bonney in 22nd and Skreczko in 27th place were the others to score for 
the Garnet Cubs. Bartlett would undoubtedly have finished better but for 
the fact that he apparently did not know just where the finish line was and 
his sprint was started several hundred yards too soon. 

Coach Thompson should be given a world of credit for developing a 
winning team from such green material. The following men were awarded 
their numerals at the end of the season: Bartlett, Bonney, Chapin, Cole, 
Skreczko and Whitten. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-TWO 



ifntkeg 




CAPTAIN. CECIL F. POOLER 
MANAGER. HOWARD W. KNIGHT 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY -TH REE 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FOUR 



Pocken 

Officers 

Coach, Carleton L. Wiggin 

Captain, Cecil F. Pooler, '29 

Manager, Howard W. Knight, '29 

W&z tlEeam 

Charles Anderson, '30; George Johnson, '30 

Morris Secor, '30 

John Cogan, '30 

Pierce Maher, '29; Francis Malia. '29 

Cecil Pooler. '29 

Joseph Topolosky, '29 

Substitutes 

Maurice Lane, '29 
Earl Garcelon, '30 



Right Wing 

Left Wing 

Center 

Right Defense 

Left Defense 

Goal 



Eloi DaiglE, '29 



§>tatc Series ^tanning 

Won Lost Tied Percent 

Bowdoin 5 1 .833 

Bates 2 3 1 .400 

Colby 1 4 1 .200 

femmmarp of Reason 

The 1929 hockey season was rather a disappointing one although at times the 
team appeared to be unbeatable. Potentially at the start of the season they 
appeared to be the best ice outfit to represent Bates in recent years but for reasons 
unknown they seemed to lack the punch necessary to score one goal and tie the 
game which was all that would have been necessary in every contest that they 
dropped. Captain-elect Cogan was the star in all of the game's and he is without 
doubt one of the most brilliant hockey players in the college ranks to-day. Secor 
and Captain Pooler played consistently good hockey. Three freshmen of unusual 
ability were available during the last half of the season in the persons of Farrell, 
McCluskey and Murphy. These yearlings should be heard from next year. 

Opening the season as is customary against the Brunswick Cabots the Bates 
team was the victor in a slow and uninteresting contest, the outcome of which 
was never in doubt in spite of the closeness of the 2-1 score. 

_ The state series was opened at Lewiston on Saturday, January 5, when Bow- 
doin scored the first of its surprising victories over the Bobcats' The Wigmen 
were the aggressors throughout the game and scored midway through the first 
period when Cogan took the puck from Secor and flipped it into the net. In the 
second period Tiemer tied the score after a solo flight down the ice. The winning- 
counter came in the overtime period when Thayer scored on a pass from Parker. 

A week later the White Mules of Colby 'invaded the Arena and held the 
Garnet to a 2-2 tie score after a rugged battle. Colby showed unexpected strength 
and during the first period swept everything before them to take a commanding 
2-0 lead. After this spurt Waterville collegians appeared to weaken and the rest 
of the game had a decided Garnet tinge with the Bobcats at all times being the 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-FIVE 



aggressors. Cogan scored both of the Bates goals and his brilliant stick work 
was outstanding at all times. Two overtimes failed to produce the tying score 
and the teams called it a day. 

Bowdoin next repeated its victory of the first game when they again were 
victorious in the fast game played on the delta at Brunswick. The first Bowdoin 
score was of the variety for which the Bates team was to become more or less 
famous before the season was over. Topolosky stopped Tiemer's bid for a goal 
and then accidently dropped the puck into the cage. All of the scoring was done 
in the first period and the remainder of the game was fairly close with the Polar 
Bears seeming to have a slight edge. 

The annual trip southward included only two games this year and the team 
broke even by overwhelming the Army and losing to M. A. C. The West Point 
game was little more than a parade, the cadets possessing one of their weakest 
teams in years. The work of Johnson featured this game. The Mass. Aggie 
contest was lost by a score of 1-0. 

Four days later the Aggies came to Lewiston for a return game and finally 
came out on top after one of the weirdest exhibitions ever seen on the St. Dom's 
surface. Jumping to an early 1-0 lead the Bobcats soon found themselves being 
smothered under an avalanche of shots and when the bell rang they found them- 
selves on the short end of a 4-1 score. In the second period led by Cogan they 
scored twice while the farmers tallied only once. Still the game seemed hopeless 
when the last quarter opened but three goals in rapid succession sent the Bates 
supporters into hysterics. With a 6-5 lead the game seemed to be theirs when 
a scant thirty seconds before the final gong the Aggies slipped one into the cage 
to send the game into the overtime. The first overtime produced the winning 
tally. 

About this time an exhibition was played with Colby about which the less said 
is probably the better. Suffice to say that undeniably rough tactics of a certain 
Colby defense man changed the game into a free for all and due to the failure of 
the referee to penalize this individual the Bates team refused to take the ice again 
and the game was lost by forfeit. 

On January 29 New Hampshire with one of the best teams in New England 
took a 1-0 decision from Bates but it took the freakiest kind of a lucky break to 
turn the trick for them. Cogan in attempting to hook the puck away from the 
net flipped it in for the only score. Fierce play during the remaining two periods 
failed to produce any more scores. 

Following the mid-year examinations Bowdoin with the state championship 
already clinched came to Lewiston and were met in no uncertain manner by a 
determined band of Bobcats. The 3-0 victory of the Bates team left no doubt 
as to the relative merits of the two teams, at that time at least. 

Minus the services of Johnny Cogan, the Wigmen then encountered M. I. T. 
and lost an exciting overtime battle by a 3-2 score. At the start Bates seemed 
outclassed, but led by Ray McCluskey, the diminutive freshman wing, they recov- 
ered themselves and battled the Beavers at every point. During the third overtime 
period the Tech boys scored the winning tally. 

There followed a decisive win over Colby at Waterville. Altho the game 
was hard fought it had none of the wrestling and football tactics which had 
distinguished the previous encounter there. The score was 3-1. 

The season was closed in a very satisfactory manner by a victory over the 
New Hampshire Wildcats at Durham. The 3-0 verdict went a long way toward 
making up for the defeat administered by them earlier in the season. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-SIX 




Jfresbmait pochen 



Coach. Fred T. Googins, '27 



Manager, Howard L. Knight, '29 



The freshman hockey team won two games, lost two and tied two during the 
season of 1928-1929. 

The season opened at the Stanley Arena in Hehron where the Big Green were 
the victors in a close game with the score standing 3-2 at the close. Considering 
the strength of the schoolboy aggregation the loss was far from discouraging. 
Farrell in the goal and McCluskey played excellent hockey for the cubs. 

There followed a decisive victory over Canton by the score of 6-1. The high 
school boys put up a hard fight after the freshmen had opened up a big lead in 
the first period but the tricky skating of McCluskey, Murphy and Secor was too 
much for them. 

Coburn Classical Institute was the next victim but the game was close and 
interesting with one of the freshmen's two goals being in the nature of a gift. 
The fine work of Farrell prevented the Waterville outfit from scoring. 

Somewhat of a surprise was in store for the yearlings when they met the fast 
skating team from Cony High in Augusta. Shortly before the final whistle blew 
the visitors slipped the tying goal past Farrell. and darkness prevented playing 
an overtime and a 2-2 score was the result. 

Bridgton Academy closed the season by scoring a well-earned victory by the 
score of 4-2. Verbal arguments with the referee slowed the game up consider- 
ably. Murphy played well for the freshmen. 

The following were awarded numerals at the end of the season: Allison, 
Farrell, Franklin, D. McCarty, McCluskey, J. Murphy, Ness, Pendergast, Sahl 
and Secor. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY ■ SEVEN 





OUR BOBCAT 




HIS CAGE 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY - EIGHT 




inter Spuria 




CAPTAIN, CECIL E. MILLER 
MANAGER. REID S. APPLEBY 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED SEVENTY-NINE 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY 



^ 



inter Sports 

GDttitns 



Captain, Cecil E. Miller, '30 

Manager, Reid S. Appleby 

Coach, Clinton Ray Thompson 



Jacob J. Immonen, '29 
Cecil E. Miller, '30 
Levite Lizotte, '30 
Alvord D. Stearns, '30 



Wbt 'ZItam 



Franklin E. Burris. '31 
Benjamin Chick, '31 
Howard H. Gerrish. '31 
Norman E. Whitten, '32 



Summary 

The season of 1929 found the winter sports team at Bates enjoying a 
successful season. Lack of interest in the sport at the other Maine colleges 
this year as in others put rather a damper on the sport. It is hoped that in 
the next few years interest will revive in this rigorous form of activity. 

During the Christmas vacation Bates was represented at the annual 
intercollegiate winter sports meet held at Lake Placid. Norman Whitten, 
'32, proved to he something of a sensation when he came home in first place 
in the two-mile snowshoe race. This victory gave Bates its only points at 
the meet. Starting against a field of seventeen of the strongest collegiate 
snowshoe artists in the country, the garnet freshman remained in third place 
for the greater part of the rough cross-country course. A half-mile from the 
finish he fell into second place directly behind Bertram of Dartmouth and 
two hundred yards from the finish took the lead and came in a winner by 
about forty yards. It was a brilliant race and the seventeen year old lad 
from Lee Academy should be a big asset to winter sports here. The other 
members of the team at the meet were Immonen, '29, Miller, '30, and Gerrish, 
'31, who were entered in the ski races, snowshoe races and ski-jumping 
respectively. 

The next meet at which Bates was represented was the meet held on 
Garcelon Field in connection with the visit of the Canadian Snow Shoe 
Clubs to Lewiston. This meet had a decidely international flavor and 
undoubtedly some of the country's best athletes in this sport were in compe- 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE 




tition. Miller, Burns, Hodgkin, Stearns and Whitten competed for Bates. 
The only place winner was Whitten who took second in the mile and half- 
mile snowshoe events. In the mile the winner was C. F. Francton of 
Montreal who is the holder of the world's record for the distance. The other 
Bates men found the competition too severe. 

The state meet held during the carnival resulted in the eighth consecu- 
tive championship for the Garnet. Maine was represented by an unexpect- 
edly strong group and the margin of victory was not as great as it has been 
in former years. Bowdoin was not officially represented altho Appleton of 
that institution was the star of the meet with first in the ski proficiency, the 
downhill ski race and ski jump. In the seven-mile ski race Immonen 
and Chick took first and second places. A tie for first between Whitten and 
Stearns was the result of the two-mile race. The downhill ski race was 
the only event in which Bates was shut out, Maine taking first, third and 
fourth places with Rollins of Colby coming in second to score the only 
points for his team. Whitten, Gerrish and Lizotte placed second, third and 
fourth in the ski jump. Ben Chick was the official winner in the ski 
proficiency. 



fewmmarp of tfjr fi^rrt 



Ski Jump 
Snowshoe Dash 
Ski Proficiency 
Downhill Ski 
Two-mile Snowshoe 
Cross-Countrv Ski 



ates 


Maine 


Colby 


6 


5 





3 


8 





9 


2 








8 


3 


9 


2 





9 


2 






Totals 



36 



27 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-TWO 



HaaEhall 




CAPTAIN. JAMES G. COLE 
MANAGER, WENDELL W. TETLEY 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-THREE 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FOUR 



|jaseb; 



rail 
flDfficerS 



Captain, James G. Cole, '29 

Manager, Wendell W. TetlEy, '29 

Coach, CarlEton L. Wiggin 

•flElje lleam 

Catcher G. Deemont Luce, '29 

Pitchers Raeph E. Giroux, '29; Norris L. Marston, '31 

First Base Cecil F. Pooler, '29 

Second Base Cornelius Turner, '29 

Third Base Abraham Plager, '32 

Shortstop James G. Cole, '29 

Right Field Roy G. Cascadden, '30 

Left Field Raymond D. Gilman, '32 

Center Field Charles F. Flaherty, '32 

fenmrnatj of Reason 

According to the established order of things the baseball season was ushered 
in with the annual Patriots Day Bowdoin game. Transferred to the Brunswick 
diamond because of the aquatic conditions on Garcelon Field it developed into a 
bitter struggle with the down river aggregation nosing out the Garnet by the score 
of 3-1. Stiles on the mound for Bowdoin had a slight edge over Norris Marston. 
The feature of the game was the clever triple play executed by the Brunswickians 
in the seventh. At the time bases were full and several Bates scores seemed 
imminent. The victory gave Houser's men an early lead in the state series which 
was enlarged this season to include four games with each college. 

The following weekend the team played Harvard and Tufts. The North- 
eastern game scheduled as a part of the trip was cancelled on account of rain. 
At Cambridge the team lost a 5-1 decision and Tufts took over the Bobcats by 3-1. 
The former featured by the pitching of Whitmore of Harvard, who pitched no-hit 
ball until the ninth, when three Bates hits were pounded out and Bates' only score 
was made. Marston pitched a good game but still showed the need of practice. 
The Tufts game was a close pitchers battle with Giroux hurling for Bates. Until 
the seventh Wiggin's men held a slim 1-0 lead. These games ended out of state 
contests and the team settled down to the task of defending the state champion- 
ship won in 1928. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-FIVE 



A smashing double by Red Flaherty, freshman sensation, scored three runs 
and was largely responsible for the defeat of Maine at the Lewiston Athletic Park 
in the opening game with the University aggregation. Marston's pitching was 
effective although he issued five bases on balls. Maine scored first when Elliot 
walked and came home on Well's triple. A moment later a passed ball by Luce 
scored Wells. In the fourth, Plager tripled to deep right field and scored on 
Cole's single. In the sixth, each team scored and the score stood 3-2. In the 
seventh, singles by Cascadden and Plager, and a walk by Cole filled the bases, and 
the stage was set for Flaherty's blow. The Black Bears went down fighting, 
however, and scored once in the eighth, and threatened in the ninth, but at the 
end they were still one short. 

On Friday, May 4, the Bobcats lost a heart-breaking game at Orono. Marston 
pitched a brilliant game, allowing only four hits and fanning fourteen. For ten 
innings the teams went scoreless but in the first of the eleventh Luce's single 
scored Turner from second and the game seemed to be sewed up. It seemed more 
so with two Maine men out and two strikes on the third. But just as the dis- 
gruntled Maine students were leaving the stands, Wells connected for a double. 
Plager then juggled Courbet's grounder, threw wild over first base and the tying 
run was across the plate. Rockway's single then ended the contest and Wiggin's 
men found themselves reposing in the cellar position in the state series. 

The result of the next game altered the aspect of things considerably. The 
Garnet was the victor over Bowdoin in a weird 12-10 fracas at Brunswick. 
Giroux on the mound allowed only seven hits but the infield supported him 
wretchedly and six errors were chalked up against them. The fifth inning was a 
wild melee. With a 2-1 score against them the Bates boys combined hits with 
Bowdoin errors to score seven runs, four of which were scored on Gilman's homer 
with the bases loaded. In the seventh the score was tied at eight all but another 
scoring bee was staged to put the game on ice. All in all it was a ragged exhibi- 
tion of the great national pastime but Bates went into second place in the league 
standing. 

Two days later the Hathorn bell announced another victory, this time over the 
league-leading White Mules. Flaherty was again the hero of the occasion. His 
triple in the twelfth with Gilman on first scored the tally that sent the stands 
into a bedlam. The score was 6-5. The game was a combination of good and 
bad playing and atrocious umpiring on bases. It is an open question as to which 
team gained the most by this last mentioned factor. Bates grabbed an early 1-0 
lead but in the sixth scored three runs on errors. The eighth was a big inning 
for the Wigmen and when the dust had cleared away the count was knotted at 
5-5. Fast double plays stopped Colby rallies in the tenth and eleventh. In the 
twelfth, Cascadden's fine throw from right field beat Deetjen to the plate when he 
attempted to score from second on a single. Flaherty then put an abrupt end to 
the whole affair with his smash over the center fielder's head. 

Now in a tie for first place with Colby the team proved its right to that posi- 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-SIX 



w 

tion by winning a fast, clean ball game from Maine by the score of 1-0. Their 
playing was a reversal of that exhibited in the two previous games and they gave 
Giroux perfect support. The game was a pitchers battle all the way with Giroux 
having a slight edge on Solander. The latter had trouble in getting settled down 
at first and three singles netted the only score of the afternoon. It was Gilman's 
hit that scored the winning run. Giroux pitched puzzling ball and the Maine 
men could do little but pop the ball to the infield. In the last of the ninth with 
two out Maine placed men on first and third, and the fans began to see visions 
of the previous game at Orono but the best that Brice's pinch hitter could do 
was to fly weakly to Pooler. 

A smashing 5-1 victory at Waterville on May 17 put the Garnet in the 
lead in the league. Marston had the White Mules eating out of his hand 
while his team-mates hit in a timely and effective manner. Flaherty was 
responsible for two of the runs when he hit a home run with one on base. 

Just as a matter of warming up for future state series conflicts the Wig'g- 
men shut out Northeastern 6-0 on Garcelon Field. Ben Chick was given 
a chance to show his wares in this game and he rose nobly to the occasion. 

The annual Ivy Day game at Bowdoin resulted in the strengthening of 
the Bobcat's hold on the lead. Marston allowed Bowdoin only six hits 
while Bates was pounding Souther and Leech for ten safe bingles, six which 
were made by Turner and Brown. The former hit a home run, a triple 
and a single. In the fourth Flaherty walked, Pooler singled and both 
scored on Turner's triple. Turner scored the next two runs in the fifth on 
a fielder's choice and in the seventh on his home run. Bowdoin's most 
serious threat came in the eighth, when a walk, a passed ball, a single and 
double accounted for two runs. The last out of the game came when Shute 
of Bowdoin was thrown out at the plate as he was trying to stretch his 
triple into a home run. 

Three days later Bowdoin made its first visit of the year to Garcelon 
Field and lost a rather loosely played game by the score of 6-4. The league 
leaders were given a real scare and going into the sixth inning were on the 
wrong end of a 3-0 score and had been hitless before the pitching of Leech. 
But Giroux took matters in his own hands and drove a titantic home run 
to the left field fence. Cascadden then singled and made his way around 
the circuit on errors by Thompson. In the next inning three runs were 
added and the game was won. Brown beat out an infield hit, Giroux walked 
and Cascadden singled, scoring Brown and sending Giroux to third and 
both scored when Leech threw wild to first on Turner's grounder. Gilman 
scored from third on Brown's sacrifice fly in the eighth inning. The Bates 
infield cracked a bit and three errors were chalked up against them. In 
the fourth Whittier tripled and scored on a single by Stiles. A wild throw 
by Brown sent Lincoln to third after he had stolen second. Thompson 
scored him on a single. Rose forced Thompson at second but went to third 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-SEVEN 



when Plager threw wild on an infield tap. The third score of the inning 
came when Turner missed Leech's grounder. In the ninth Bowdoin had 
the bases full with only one out but Flaherty caught Crimmin's fly and 
\\ 'hittier struck out. 

Bates made sure of its second consecutive state championship by defeat- 
ing Colby in a thrilling game at Waterville on May 29. Marston was 
assigned the task of clinching the pennant for Wiggin's men and he was 
not as effective as usual, but errorless fielding and heavy hitting gave Bates 
an early lead which was of great assistance to them when Colby rallied in 
the closing innings. The last two innings were the ones which told the 
story. Trailing by the score of 4-2 the Waterville outfit showed its fight 
by tying the score on Brown's single and Lovett's home run over the fence. 
Marston opened the tenth with a single, went to second on Cascadden's 
bunt and scored on Captain Cole's double. Plager then singled and Cole 
crossed the plate. The last half of the tenth was heartbreaking for the 
large crowd in the stands. Deetjen doubled and Ferguson walked. Wiggin 
then removed Marston and sent Giroux in to save the game. He balked on 
his first pitch and the runners were on second and third with none out. But 
the Bates infield refused to get excited over the situation and the next 
three men were thrown out at first. The Bobcats scored in the first inning 
mainly on the skillful base running of Cascadden, who on two infield outs 
negotiated his way around the bases after he had singled. Flaherty's single 
was the scoring punch in the fourth inning. In the sixth two more runs 
were added on consecutive singles by Turner, Cole, Plager and Gilman. 
The playing of Cole was sensational thruout the contest. He hit safely 
twice and made several brilliant stops. 

The winning of the state championship is a very fitting send-off for 
Wiggin who becomes head baseball coach at Wesleyan next year. Most 
of the credit is due to him for at the beginning of the season the Garnet 
was only rated as an ordinary ball club but the instilling of a winning spirit 
into the team has been the greatest factor in its success. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-EIGHT 



5frark 




CAPTAIN. ROYAL S. ADAMS 
MANAGER. WEDGEWOOD P. WEBBER 



PAG" on: hundred eighty-nine 



s%&$W§^ 





PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY 



Stack 



Captain. Royal S. Adams, '29 

Manager, Wedgkwood P. Webber, '29 

Coach, C. Ray Thompson 

<Wttt 'Eeam 

Paul Chesley, '29 Romeo J. Houle, '30 Stuart W. Jones, '31 

Raymond E. Nilson, '29 Flavius B. Hubbard, '30 Clinton Dill, '32 

Ralph Giroux, '29 Russell H. Chapman, '31 Ernest W. Knox, '32 

Chadbourne R. Knowlton, '30 Wallace E. Viles, '31 Norman E. Whitten, '32 

§>ummatp 

Bates placed second in the Two-Mile Relay at the B. A. A. Games. 
Northeastern defeated Bates in an indoor dual meet at Lewiston. 
Bates placed second in the Two-Mile National Championship Relay at 
the I. C. A. A. A. A. Indoor Meet in New York. 

Bates was defeated by Maine in an indoor dual meet at Orono. 
Bates ran fifth in the Two-Mile RelaY at the Penn Relay Carnival. 
New Hampshire defeated Bates in a dual meet at Lewiston. 
Bates placed second in the Maine Intercollegiates. 

B. fl. a. C5ame0 

The track team opened the indoor season with competition in the B. 
A. A. Games at Boston on February 2. Coach Thompson elected to run 
three teams in the evening's program. A mile team was to run against 
Northeastern and Worcester Tech. Experienced quarter-milers being very 
scarce this year, the men on the team, S. Kilbourne, Cascadden, Fuller, and 
Gould, had none of them ever before seen competition in a relay race. 
Northeastern was especially rich in fast steppers and took the lead at the 
first corner. Kilbourne, running lead-off, turned in as fast a quarter as 
could be asked for, the fastest of his indoor running, but could be no better 
than second at the finish of his leg of the twelve laps. The other three 
men met the same sort of opposition from the Northeastern men and Gould, 
the anchor man, finished in second place. 

Bates' hopes were centered on the Varsity Two-Mile Relay, one of the 
outstanding events of the evening. Due to the win of last year in a record- 
breaking race, the team was the defending" champion and everything looked 
good for a repetition with two of last year's men, Captain Adams and Chesley 
still on the team ably supported by Chapman and Yiles, both men of out- 
standing merit. Chesley was running in his customary position of lead- 
off and got away in good shape. A wilt at the finish however dropped him 
back from the favorable position of second into fourth in the midst of the 
confusion of many runners on a narrow track. Due to this fact the pass 
to Yiles was muffed and Yiles was thrown down by the heavier runners. 
This placed Bates in last place. Adams, running third, and Chapman, 
anchor man, worked hard to pass in some good half-miles and pass all but 
the man from the University of New Hampshire and take a second. The 
time was 8:14, nine seconds slower than the time made by the Bates team 
the year before. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-ONE 




For the first time a freshman team ran for Bates in the race open to 
freshman teams. More than ordinary ability was found in the freshman 
class and a very respectable team composed of Knox, Dill, Bartlett, and 
Cole took a creditable third against a big field. Holy Cross, anchored by 
the doughty MacCaffertv, won the event while Dartmouth ran second. ' 



Z$t ftovttfc astern Stf?rct 

On February 23, Bates met the team which had beaten them in the mile 
relay at the B. A. A. Games three weeks before. The Boston boys showed 
themselves in other events than the relay although it was the two-lap relay 
race, the last event on the program, that finally decided the meet. The 
same team that had won in the mile race earlier in the season again won 
their event and Bates was nosed out by the close score of 41-45. 

The meet was well contested and so close throughout that it was replete 
with interest and competition. Early in the list of events Wally Viles 
showed his wares by cleanly leaving behind the entire field and setting a 
new gym record of 4:34 for the mile run. Another sophomore, Hayes, by 
a pretty bit of sprinting at the finish took second. The points were sorely 
needed, however, since the visitors had taken first and second in the dash 
and made a clean sweep of that event in which Bates is weakest, the hurdles. 

Captain Adams decided not to allow all the speed events to go to the 
opponents and took first in a lightning finish in the 300. In the middle 
distances, "Ossie" Chapman took two firsts, one in the 600 and another in 
the 1000. vSome close running by Lind and Adams gave them a tie for 
second and a third respectively. 

The relay team of Adams, Gould, Knox, and Cole was unable to keep 
up with the quartet of Huskies and the lead of the opponents gradually 
increased and with it the winning points of the meet were taken by North- 
eastern. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-TWO 



Summary 



Event 
40 Yard Dash 
45 Yard Hurdles 
Mile Run 
300 Yard Run 
600 Yard Run 
1000 Yard Run 
Two Mile 
High Jump 
Shot Put 
Relav Race 



Bates 

1 

8 
5 
6 
7 
9 
1 
4 




Northeastern 
8 
9 
1 
4 
3 
2 




Totals 



41 



45 



^Ijr 3. C. #. 8. a. 8. Sntjoor Sfcrrt 

For the first time in a number of years Bates sent a team to the winter 
meeting of the I. C. A. A. A. A. for the championship of America. The 
meet was held in New York in the 168th Street Armory which is credited 
with having the fastest track in the world. Bates was again pitting her 
Two-mile Relay team against the fastest teams of the East. New York 
University was favored to win the meet and, with the great Olympic runner, 
Edwards, running on the two-mile team was counted on to take that race. 
Princeton and Georgetown were favored to place well up in the money. 
The Bates delegation was out to avenge the former defeat, however, and 
ran the best that was in them. 

The lead-off man, Chesley, ran a heady race and finished in second place, 
well ahead of the crowd. Captain Adams, taking the baton from him and 
running second, took the lead during his race and, running a two-minute 
half, passed over a few yards to Viles. Viles can run as fast a half as was 
shown by his turning in a 1 :58. He was competing against the best of the 
best, now, and was passed by a Georgetown man and a man from N. Y. U. ; 
he passed to Chapman in third place but with only a few yards separating 
him from the leader. 

Then followed a real race between the Bates anchor man and the Violet 
runner. All others were left far behind. Chapman closed in on his oppo- 
nent and dogged his footsteps for some time. With just a lap of the track 
to go he came up abreast of the leader and attempted to go by. The man 
was not yet ready to give in and the corner was reached before "Ossie" 
could succeed in gaining the lead. On the back stretch the N. Y. U. runner 
sped for all he was worth and Chapman was able only to keep pace with 
him. The winning time was 7:52 with Bates a second behind. 

Batrs^attu Dual Street 

The annual indoor meet with the University of Maine was held at Orono 
on March 9. It was a meet of fast times and close races with Bates men 
doing their best to garner points. The aggregation under the leadership of 
Coach Jenkins proved that they possessed the strength that was suspected 
of them and took the meet 73-44. Three of the records for the Maine track 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-THREE 



were broken and six of the records for the meet likewise went under the 
work of the two teams. Captain Adams quite outdid himself in winning 
both the 300 and the 600 from men supposed before the race to be faster 
than himself. Black of Maine made a total of eleven points and was high 
point man. Dill, the Freshman pole-vaulter, won first place in the event 
while Giroux tied for second place. Bates again showed her weakness in 
the hurdles. 

The times in the running events and the distances in the field events 
plainly showed the high class of the meet and would have done justice to 
any company whatever. Lindsay's mile, run in 4 :20, was as fast as the 
one which took the race at the I. C. 4A meet the week before. 





femmmarp 




Event 


Bates 


45 Yard Dash 




1 


45 Yard High Hurdles 




1 


One Mile Run 




4 


600 Yard Run 




9 


Two Mile Run 




3 


1000 Yard Run 




4 


300 Yard Dash 




5 


Running High Jump 




4 


Shot Put 







Running Broad Jump 




4 


Pole Vault 




7 


Throwing Discus 




1 


35 lb. Weight 




1 



Maine 
8 
8 
5 

6 
5 
4 
5 
9 
5 
2 
8 



Total 



44 



73 



tlfjr I5atrs=#eto ^ampsfjtrc Snial 9$ctt 

The first outdoor dual meet of the season was held at Lewiston with 
New Hampshire on May 4. The visitors took the meet to the tune of 75^- 
59 1 /2- There were several upsets, among the most unexpected were the 
results of the mile and the quarter. Yiles led practically the entire race in 
the mile and then found that the wind and mud had so tired him that Calahan 
of the Wildcat team beat him to the finish by a few yards. In the quarter 
it seemed to Captain Adams that there were too many men running. Adams 
was effectually boxed for almost the entire distance and at the finish the 
unexpected strength of Noyes forced Adams to be satisfied with a second. 

In the 120 high hurdles Kilbourne grabbed off a second place for Bates 
against some fast company. The 100 yard dash went to the freshman 
sprinter, Knox, with Johnny Cogan stealing out a third place. Another 
freshman, Whitten, added three points by taking a second in the two-mile 
after very nearly beating his man to the tape. Chapman easily took the half- 
mile after being challenged once by a New Hampshire man. Knowlton did a 
fine bit of work in the broad jump and made a record of 22 feet lU/o inches. 
In fact, all of the field events with the exception of the hammer throw were 
creditable. Dill set a new meet record in the pole vault along with Brooks 
of New Hampshire by tying with him at 11 feet 9 inches. Houle won the 
discus at 132 feet. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FOUR 








W&t ^tnnsplbanta liitlaps 

After the race run in New York the Two-Mile Relay team was again 
primed to make a bid for the honors of the title of Two-Mile Relay Champ- 
ions by annexing the race at Philadelphia. Again they were defending 
champions and again they were meeting the best of the land. Lady Jinx 
had followed them all the way to the Quaker City, however, and on the 
first turn the baton was kicked from Chesley's grasp while he was attempt- 
ing to pass a runner. It placed him well in the rear and made any running 
by the other members of the team entirely futile. The race was won by a 
very able team from the University of Chicago with New York University 
second. The time for the two miles was 7 :50. Chapman ran a half that 
was clocked in under 1 :56 and finished in fifth place. 

Hty 9$&int lnttztolU$iate$ 

The State classic in the track and field games was held at Waterville 
on May 18. Although the dopesters had conceded Maine the victory before 
the meet started and although the University was out in the lead from the 
very start, the competition given by the other three colleges was a kind 
that would have gone far in any ordinary meet. The weather was the best 
in years, being nearly perfect with very little wind and enough warmth to 
make the contestants feel full of pep. Maine won the meet, adding up 
the largest score that has ever been totalled by the winner, 81 1/3, while 
Bates was in second with 27, Bowdoin third with 17 1/3, and Colbv trailing 
with 9 1/3. 

Wally Viles started off the scoring of points for Bates in the mile run, 
the first final to be run. Finishing a very short distance behind two flyers 
from the U. of M., he ran the fastest mile of his career to take a third. The 
winning time was 4:25 1/5. The next event on the list also netted Bates 
a single point. Captain Adams found that a third was the best he could 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-FIVE 







do in the 440. Running a fast trial in the morning and attempting to 
repeat in the 220 he was used up by the afternoon races. The time in the 
quarter equalled the record, 49 4/5. Maine took the other eight points in 
both the events. 

In the 100 yard dash Bates took the lion's share of the points, thanks to 
the fine performance of little Billy Knox who won the event in 10 seconds. 
The 880 yard run came very near to being a clean up for Bates, a Bates 
parade. Chapman, running from behind as usual, took the lead from 
Chesley with 300 yards to go. Chesley fell in behind him and Lind, the 
long-legged alternate on the winter's relay team, was close upon Chesley's 
heels. For over 250 yards they raced thus, the three Garnet jerseys in 
single file. Just at the finish, however, Lind was overtaken and beaten by 
the fast finish of Rivken of Colby. Chapman's time, 1 :56, set a new record. 

The two-mile run was a romp for Richardson of Maine who came within 
a second of the record for the distance. Gaining- a lead of a good hundred 
yards in the early part of the race he held the advantage and won in 9:46 1/5. 
The real race was for second and third positions with Whitten battling 
with a Maine man and a Bowdoin man for the points. In a regular sprint 
finish Whitten managed to get into third place and came very near to taking 
second. 

Another mark was set in the field events when O'Connor of Maine 
jumped 23 feet 5/8 inches to better the mark of thirteen years standing. 
Knox, of Bates placed third in the event while Knowlton was unable to 
get out into the distances that counted. Dill came through even better 
than was expected of him and took first in the pole vault. 





feiummarp 








Event 


Maine 


Bates 


Bowdoin 


Colby 


One Mile Run 


8 


1 








440 Yard Dash 


8 


1 








100 Yard Dash 


4 


5 








120 Yard Hurdles 


8 





1 





880 Yard Run 





8 





1 


220 Yard Dash 


6 








3 


Two Mile Run 


8 


1 








220 Yard Low Hurdles 


6 





3 





Running High Jump 


6 1/3 





1 1/3 


1 1/3 


Shot Put 


3 





6 





Running Broad Jump 


5 


1 


3 





Hammer Throw 


5 


1 





3 


Pole Vault 


1 


6 


2 





Javelin Throw 


8 





1 





Throwing the Discus 


5 


3 





1 



Total 81 1/3 27 17 1/3 

<H§t jReto (England SntcrcoUcgiatoS 



9 1/3 



Scoring in six events and finishing in fourth place, the Bobcats returned 
from the New Englands well satisfied with their showing. Maine won the 
meet as was expected with a total of 43 points, and was not even pressed 
by Holy Cross and Brown who finished second and third by scoring 25 and 
24 points. The sixteen points garnered by Bates were enough to assure 
them of fourth place. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SIX 




(Founts 




Captain, Harold W 



GDtticttH 

Richardson, '30 

Manager, Gardner B. Alexander, '29 

Coach, George Tufts 



^Tfjr tEeam 



Harold W. Richardson, '30 
Leo J. F. Bujold, '32 



Clifton W. Jacobs, '32 

Mashe L. Lightman, '32 



§>ummarp of Reason 

The 1929 tennis season was a rather unsuccessful one, in-as-much as the 
team failed to win any of its matches. At the beginning of the season an 
enthusiastic but green squad reported to Coach Tufts. Graduation took 
such stars as Davis, Moulton and Rand and it was the freshman class which 
supplied the major portion of the material. 

The season opened with a dual match with Colby at Waterville. The 
Elm City outfit was an easy victor by the score of 5-1. Bujold was the 
only victor for the Garnet. He defeated Deleware of Colby in a close match. 

PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-SEVEN 




Another freshman, Jacobs, proved to be Bates' only threat in the state 
championships held at Waterville on May 17. In the opening round he 
defeated Deleware of Colby, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4. The other Bates players were 
eliminated. In the second round he met Farrington Abbott of Bowdoin, a 
player of considerable reputation, and was a victor, 7-5, 6-4. In the finals 
played a week later he lost to Soley of Bowdoin, 6-0, 6-1, 6-1. One of the 
surprises of the tournament was the elimination of Tattersall of Colby, the 
defending champion. 

At the New England Intercollegiates, Jacobs and Richardson represented 
Bates ; Richardson was eliminated in the first round by Wigglesworth of 
M. I. T. After drawing a bye in the first round Jacobs survived the second 
by defeating Allen of Colby 6-4, 6-2. Worth of Wesleyan eliminated him 
in the third round in a close match, 7-5, 7-5. Jacobs put up a fine game 
against his more experienced opponent. In the doubles competition, Jacobs 
and Richardson were eliminated in the first round by Parker and Soley of 
Bowdoin, 6-3, 6-2. 

The Tufts tennis team visited the campus on May 29 and whitewashed 
the local team by a score of 5-0. Bujold in the singles and Bujold and 
Lightman in the doubles forced their opponents the most. In his match 
with Young of Tufts, Bujold won the first set and forced the second to an 
8-6 score before losing but the third went to the Tufts man by 6-1. In the 
other singles matches, Lightman lost to McCaul, 6-4, 6-1 and Jacobs fell 
before the fine playing of Roberts, 6-3, 6-2. Jacobs showed the strain of too 
much competition. Richardson and Jacobs lost to Gifford and Young, 6-1, 
6-1, while Roberts and Hubbard were defeating Bujold and Lightman, 8-6, 
6-1. 

Another loss was sustained on the morning of Memorial Day when 
Weslevan scored a 5-0 victory. The extreme heat slowed up the matches 
considerablv. 



PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-EIGHT 








e^@B 



s> 




PAGE ONE HUNDRED NINETY-NINE 





miomax's %Mttk goarb, 1928-23 



President 

J T ice-President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 



Ethelyn Hqyt 

Bernice Parsons 

Dorothy Stiles 

Professor Walmsley 



Managers 



Hockey 

Hiking 

Archery and Volleyball 

Winter Sports 

Basketball 

Indoor Baseball and Track 

Soccer 

Tennis 



Senior 

Junior 

Sophomore 

Freshman 

Athletic Coaches 

Assisted by 



Class Representatives 



Frances Johnson 

Ruth Skelton 

Dorothy Hanscom 

Ruth Patterson 

Catherine Nichols 

Belva Carle 

Shirley Brown 

Doris David 



Priscilla LundervillE 

Lydia Pratt 

Mina Tower 

Dorothy Sullivan 

Professor Walmsley, Miss James 

Miss Booth, Miss Phelps 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED 




tyt Spirit of "%.%." 

"Not merely to win, but to play; 
Not to destroy, but to build; 
Not smugness but beauty in growth; 
These are our aims — the 'A. A.' " 

J. R., '27 

The purpose of A. A. is to promote permanent interest and sportsmanlike 
participation in athletics, and to co-operate with the Physical Education Depart- 
ment in developing every girl's physical and mental efficiency to the utmost of her 
ahility. 

From four years of feeling this spirit and this purpose we know that A. A. 
succeeds. Every girl in college is an active memher of A. A. Consequently it 
can well afford awards for special accomplishment. A few ideal girls attain the 
highest of these, the cup, for their evidenced ahility and interest. Some are 
decorated with the "B" medal. Many earn the white sweater and nearly everyone 
merits her class numerals. But A. A. doesn't consider its power as resting in the 
numher of girls possessing awards. Its greatest joy is that whatever girls do 
win is done by the right spirit, the game for the game's sake, forgetting the 
award is the real inspiration. There's a real thrill in winning when you've 
played for the love of playing. And losing isn't hard when you've given all you 
had ! (Expcrieiitia Dacet) A. A. aims for participation of everyone, in some 
way or another, when winning doesn't mean points toward the class cup. Which, 
by the way, that inimitable class, '29, is bound to get, eventually. A. A. has, and 
will put emphasis on the value of sister class games at the end of hockey, basket- 
ball, etc., also the inter-dorm Basketball league; all-college-girls' skate at St. 
"Dom's", the Greek Fete; Hare and Hound picnics, and all activities pointing 
toward a spreading of this true "play-spirit". 

It has been a privilege and pleasure, being on A. A. Board this year. The 
"Pre.", "Eth." and the "Phys. Ed. Heads", in fact, every board member has the 
interest of the whole association at heart. The 1930 Board we hail as equally 
strong and to it we extend our best wishes. With Fran and those constantly 
helpful coaches it can't go wrong ! 

P.S. : We have heard that the college medical authorities are very gratified 
with the good effects voluntary training has on this W. A. A. (But it cannot be 
realizing the half of it) Bates girls are getting " ? and Better" every year. What 
a generation this training is forming. It can't be beaten for efficiency and wide- 
spread popularity — (Virtue Rewarded!) 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ONE 





Ut 



feirls 



Shirley Brown, '29 
Hazel Blanchard, '2 
Belva Carll, '29 
Ruth Conant, '29 
Doris Chick, '29 
Doris David, '29 
Pauline Davis, '29 
Mary Finn, '29 
Helen Goodwin, '29 
Louise Gilman, '29 
Eleanor Gile, '29 
Velma Gibbs, '29 
Ethelyn Hoyt, '29 



Myrtle Huff, '29 
Helen Holman, '29 
Evelyn Kennard, '29 
Florence Kyes, '29 
Yvonne Langlors, '29 
Lucy Lundell, '29 
Priscilla Lunderville, 
Francis Maguire, '29 
Eunice McCue, '29 
Phyllis Misiner, '29 
Dorothy Nutter, '29 
Ruth Patterson, '29 
Mary Pike, '29 



Helen Sanders, '29 
Winifred Sanders, '29 
Ruth Skelton, '29 
Eugenia Southard, '29 
Erma Tetley, '29 
Evelyn Webb, '29 
Eleanor Wood, '29 
Grace Young, '29 
Mildred Young, '29 
Jeanette Cutts, '30 
Dorothy Hanscom, '30 
Frances Johnson, '30 
Bernice Parsons, '30 



The most frequently seen of all A. A's awards is the "B" sweater. Sometimes 
it's white. Now it isn't just that eternal feminine vanity that makes us happy to 
perspire or freeze, take cold showers (and they are cold!), starve hetween meals 
for want of a peanut, and get in eight hours sleep, to get stripes toward this 
sweater. Nor is it the need of a warm wrap. It's the love of wearing some- 
thing, along with your companions, that represents your joy in sports, perse- 
verance and skill. It's a mark of distinction, this sweater, showing that you've 
made the hest of your ability and that your ability merited reward. But say, 
wearing the sweater isn't the only joy a "B" girl gets. "B" girls have lots of 
cabin parties of the Bring-your-own-man, more fun than the ocean has waves, 
kind. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWO 



#ixt Caatbes 




Want a leader? Want a friend? If you want 
just anything why send over to Cheney, first floor, 
hack. An' if Prof. Walmsley's there, and you want 
somethin' a human bein' can do, she'll help you out. 
Always, too, with something worthwhile, you just bet 
you ! Can't find a fairer, squarer guide, who sees a 
problem from every side. Want high ideals, judgment 
and fun? Here you have them all in one! Always 
smiling, and gets things done — Prof. Walmsley. 



PROF. WALMSLEY 



'Got to thinkin', just last nite, what makes Connie's 
eyes so bright? Guess it's just the fun inside, tryin', 
oh so hard to hide ! Yet it can't help peepin' through, 
smiley-like at me and you. Wonder if the folks out 
West didn't make a bit of fuss when Connie brot her 
dancin' and her smilin' eyes, to us? 'Cause we've 
found that, 'neath the sunshine and the happiness out- 
side, a right good friend, advisor and counselor abide. 



rk 



I 




MISS JAMES 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THREE 





The hiking-season starts soon after the opening 
of college, continuing until Thanksgiving recess. It 
is a seven point sport for the girl who cannot or does 
not choose to play the major games, Hockey or Tennis, 
and provides more exercise than archery. This is a 
popular sport and is found to furnish the finest of 
exercise along with the eternal joy of going places and 
seeing things with lusty companions. Supper-hikes to 
Thorncrag or the River-hank are special features for 
the whole group and you know how good hot dogs 
and all the fixin's are out-of-doors. 



MANAGER 
RUTH SKELTON, 



Archery is one of the relatively new activities of 
W. A. A. The year 1928 being its fourth season. 
This sport is open to all interested but is specially pro- 
vided for those girls unable to play in the more strenu- 
ous sports that W. A. A. promotes. Archery has be- 
come both a fall and spring activity. The spring 
championship, shot at the Greek Festival, was won by 
the Juniors, '28, and the fall champs were the Seniors, 
'29. 




MANAGER 
DOROTHY HANSCOM. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FOUR 





MOLerrbail 

If the Locker building ever re-echoed, it was during the volleyball games. 
The Senior cheers and exultations reverberated throughout the building. 

The Seniors were out for the game. Were the Juniors? Of course! 
What about the Sophomores and Freshmen? They had spirit too! 

The Seniors held last year's victory before them, and were determined 
not to hand the flag of truce to the Junior class. 

The preliminary game was with the Sophomores. Fran Maguire's serve 
is a mighty one. The score of this game was 67-18 in favor of the Senior 
girls. 

The Senior-Junior game was the most exciting one of the season. The 
outcome determined the championship. The Seniors forged ahead at the 
start; but the Juniors, undaunted, made a spurt near the close of the game 
only to lose by three points. The class of '29 had a score of 32. 

It was the plucky Freshmen that tried to steal a march on the fourth 
year girls. They rolled up a sizable score. When the referee's final whistle 
blew, the score was 58-32 in favor of the Seniors. 

Thus, the 29-ers defended their title to the volleyball championship. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIVE 




Sbcknr 




In the fall, the Bates-returning co-ed's first ques- 
tion is, "When does hockey practice begin?". The 
veterans of the three upperclasses are eager to don 
the pinnies, try to find a matched pair of shin-guards 
and a good stick and get goin'. The Freshmen, having 
recovered from initiation, are anxious to try their hand 
at this game which has been the topic of conversation 
since college opened. 

At last, schedules are posted and eighty-nine enthu- 
siastic girls are working out under the coaching of 
Professor Walmsley and Miss James. The captains 
are elected, teams picked, and it is the eve of the 1928 
tournament ; Seniors and Juniors primed for a strug- 
gle for the championship ; Sophomores out to do or die ; 
Freshmen just a bit nervous and excited at the thought 
of their first game. 



MANAGER 
FRANCES JOHNSON. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SIX 





The fate of the Juniors was decided in the very first game of the tournament 
when the Senior "Bolsheviki" fought their way to a score of 3-1. What a game! 
As a second feature of the afternoon, the Freshmen showed their merit by losing 
by only one point to the hard pressed Sophs, in a game played far, far into the 
twilight. Emboldened by their previous victory, the Seniors triumphed over the 
Sophs 10-2. In the next game of the tournament the Juniors proved that they 
were down but not out by gaining four goals to none on the score sheet of their 
sister class of '32; and by defeating the Sophomores 8-2. That same afternoon 
the Seniors defeated the Freshmen. The next week the second teams of '30, '31, 
'32 played off a series of games which left the Juniors victors. 

Many were the shattered nerves and hoarse voices after those weeks in Novem- 
ber. By this time King Winter decided that the co-eds had had enough thrills 
for one season, and put an efficient end to affairs with a brisk, decidedly anti- 
hockey snowstorm. Regretfully were the balls and sticks, pinnies and guards put 
away for another long year until the fall of 1929. Everyone is agreed that 
hockey's a great game. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SEVEN 





lashetbatl 



"O, basketball's a grand old game", sang more than 
seventy girls at the banquet that marked the close of 
a highly exciting and well-played season of basketball. 
The Juniors, 1928 Champions, came out on top again. 
But only after three hard-fought, fast and furious 
games where every minute counted. The Seniors, 
runners up, were too close for comfort, especially in 
the final game when the score was 42-38. The Sopho- 
mores, rated, by prediction, the lowest, sprung the 
season's surprise when, in the best game of the week, 
they defeated the fighting frosh 31-29. The Fresh- 
men were a continued source of worry to all upper- 
class teams. Although they dropped every game, they 
played well — (Bless them, everyone, they've got the 
spirit that we love to see.) They are giving next sea- 
son an interesting outlook. 

The interdorm tournament had its high-spots, too, 
and ended in that great game where the Town Girls' 
team beat Rand (Rand won two games, anyway) with 
a score of 21-15. And not many bruises! 



MANAGER 
INE NICHOLS, '30 


The Scores : 






Juniors, 


42 


Seniors, 


38 


Juniors, 


40 


Freshmen, 


17 


Juniors, 


67 


Sophomores, 


13 


Seniors, 


34 


Sophomores, 


31 


Seniors, 


39 


Freshmen, 


24 


Sophomores, 


31 


Freshmen, 


29 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED EIGHT 




MANAGER 
SHIRLEY BROWN. 



>otccr 



Spring, for one thing, means Soccer and Soccer 
means out-of-doors. We rejoice when we can once 
more kick that little old ball with all the force of 
winter-suppressed desires. Yes, Soccer is one of the 
most popular sports and if you don't believe us come 
out some fair or maybe even a rainy day and you'll get 
a real kick out of it too, if you use your head. Who 
will ever forget that game last spring between '29 and 
'30, when, with the score one to one, the heavens tried 
to dampen our spirits. Well, maybe we did get wet. 
The flesh is weak. But not for a minute was the 
spirit soaked. And the flesh and field were well dried 
by Greek Fete Day so we tried to play off the tie. 
But it was of such good quality that it wouldn't get 
played out ; we tied again, and this time a Gordian 
knot. We think it was better so. This spring's 
games will tell — . 



Winter Sports 



Oh, get on some woolens and come on snowshoe- 
ing ! Yea, with pleasure. And sometimes we go ski- 
ing and skating and tobogganing, and just to jar your 
memory, spilling too. As soon as Lake Andrews gets 
frozen, who vies with old winter to skate? We do. 
We, the winter sports. We practice for the carnival, 
the great contest where points toward the cup can be 
piled up. We play hockey for fun ! And what fun, 
not to mention what hockey ! And then it snows ! 
And with the snowfall, "Clearing and meadow, stream 
and ice-bound pond are made once more a trackless 
wilderness." But Mount David is never trackless for 
long after one of these Mainely snow storms. Our 
hopes in becoming ski experts go up and down as we 
mount Mount David higher and higher. Nothing does 
so much for the complexion or the sense of humor 
than this getting out and under the snow. Dr. Patter- 
son will back us up in this, we know. 




MANAGER 
RUTH PATTERSON. '29 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED NINE 





Baseball 

Twilight league games of three innings and ending at quarter of ten may 
be unusual but not in co-ed baseball. Between the Twins and our State 
Champions-to-be the cage was much in demand, so the girls played at night. 
These evening games gave certain of the Rand Hall sweethearts a chance 
to be on parade. Some who came to laugh remained to cheer (somewhat). 

After three weeks of practice the teams were chosen and the games 
played off in the Athletic building. The Seniors ended the season as 
champions without having lost a game. The Juniors were runners-up 
losing- only to '29 by a 16-15 score. '31 lost to the Freshmen by one run. 



League Standing 



'29 

'30 
'32 
'31 



1.000 
.666 

.333 
.000 



Thus endeth the season ! 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TEN 




Natural ganrinpg 



The Sophomores are introduced to it ; the Juniors may elect it during 
the Indoor Season ; the Seniors may choose to take it twice a week for nearly 
the whole year. 

Creation of Dance, and Natural Graces, which last conies through 
muscle freedom and control, through the medium of vigorous physical 
exercise to music, and complete enjoyment are the aims of Natural Dancing. 

The Sophomores begin with basic work, muscle freeing and strength- 
ening, music tempos and begin to create dance forms. 

The Juniors continue with basic work adding more intimate rhythm, 
and progress in work with Tone-pitch enabling them to create more advanced 
dances. 

The Seniors progress the most. They begin work in Special rhythms 
with or without music. They enter the intricacies of dancing with a scarf, 
and specialize in the waltz. The Seniors are advanced in creative work, 
and reach the point of dancing to poetry. They finish their college dancing 
careers with their participation in the Greek Play. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN 










Lfifii - 












_ 




"illiiii 



Ccnnis 



Every spring we are impatient until the courts have 
dried off and we can get in trim for the class ladder 
tournaments. Usually these come the last of May, 
extending into June ( this rainy weather ! ) with a final 
elimination tournament for the class and individual 
cup. A spring season alone, however, is not enough 
for the conscientious, and game-loving racketeers. 
Consequently, a fall season for the experienced hut 
more especially for beginners has heen added. At this 
season, instruction and exhibitions are given. Instead 
of the usual class tournament, two mixed groups were 
arranged — one. for the beginners and for the advanced. 
By playing off a series of challenges the better players 
were sifted out into the first four places — 7 points! 



MANAGER 
DORIS DAVID. 



Crack 



When spring really comes and our athletic field 
dries off, everything is all set for the girl's track sea- 
son. Track appeals strongly to many co-eds. Prob- 
ably the best thing about it is the variety of exercise 
each practice provides — running, hurdling, broad- 
jumping, discus-throwing and javelin-hurling. 

Last year, Miss James introduced Greek technique 
in some of the events — the discus throwing and hur- 
dles. 

About the Meet? And the Champs? Last year, 
the class of '30 carried off the honors with '29 second. 
Sometimes the dope and dopesters get upset ! 




MANAGER 
BELVA CARLL. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWELVE 



(Sarnets bs. Jikrks 



Over fifty of the faculty asked for reserved seats, high school girls came in 
throngs, and, oh, how the men pleaded with the co-eds for just one ticket to the 
Gym Meet in Rand. To put it mildly, the Gym was crowded. 

First, the freshmen performed. Why, it made us breathless to watch them ! 
No easy task to be perpetual motion machines for fifteen minutes — and no 

slackers with Miss James standing there urging each one to pull hard, push, 

push, push. 

Next, fairy creatures flitting about in floods of orange and rose light, to the 
strains of delicate music. Fairies? Why, no! Sophomores in pastel costumes, 
interpreting, improvising, expressing themselves in dance. Then, the Juniors, 
more accomplished and perfected fairies. And finally the seniors and Miss James, 
herself, the climax of the program of dancing. 

The stunts and tumbling were just a little bit different and original, the 
individual program was another proof of the health-building aim of the Depart- 
ment. The juniors showed skill in their apparatus work; the games were exciting. 
The feeling of friendly competition throughout the Meet was keen, and no small 
factor of the contest was the organized cheering. 

A little after ten the girls trooped back to their respective dorms, happy to 
have had a part in perpetuating another Bates tradition. 



Women's J)bnsttal $bntKfium Uleet 

Rand Hall Gymnasium 



Bates College 



1. 

2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 



9. 
10. 



Thursday, March 14, 1929 

Fundamental Gymnastics 

Foundation of Natural Dancing 

Individual Program 

Natural Dancing 

Stunts and Tumbling 

Apparatus 

Games 

Jump Sticks 

Crows and Cranes 

Club Snatch 

Newcombe 

Bat Ball 

Basketball 
Natural Dancing 
W. A. A. Awards 
Results of Meet 



At 7.45 P.M. 



Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Seniors 

Fthelyn Hoyt 

Dr. Clifton D. Gray 



Alma Mater 
Judges 
Miss Ethelyn Hoyt, Miss Florence Kyes, Miss Frances Maguire 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED THIRTEEN 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN 




Z ''*$ ■■'■ 



:::3 



il« 



WttO fc€AD Ojfeft 

you b 
Oust ^ec p 



iResecTioc* 



^OHCS, 



iC9 






BTiUWCO 


^Tocks j 


hex TftelJCST 


e» you 


rj»V«»w- 


fST 


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PAGE TWO HUNDRED FIFTEEN 




#ncc Spon ii Cime 




Carl Woodcock: "I've 
driven this car for seven 
years and never had a 
wreck!" 

N. Ross: "You mean 
you've driven that wreck 
for seven years and never 
had a car." 




"..■ 



PREXY 

W c don't know about the 
wand"er"ing instinct but 
we're sure the "er'ing 
instinct had appeared be- 
fore this time. 




NORM 



T h e 
had a 



hoarding instinct 
good start zvhen 
this picture was taken — 
Note its reach to-day! 



Barber: "Well, my lit- 
tle man, how would you 
like your hair cut?" 

Harry Rowc's Son: "If 
you please sir, just like 
father's, and don't forget 
the little round hole at the 
top where the head comes 
through." 



Bobby: "It seems to 
me, dear, that there is 
something wrong with this 
soup." 

Yvonne: "Wrong again, 
dear, the cookhook says it 
is perfectly delicious." 



CARL 

Bet Carl was wondering 
how the negative was 
coming out zvhen this 
picture was being taken! 




PROF ROB 

Wonder if they had to 
use the art of gentle 
persuasion to get t h i s 
picture ? Note that in- 
stinct of self-preserva- 
tion appearing! 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED SIXTEEN 




oo's loo in 1929 



"Rave-on" Nilson 

Assistant in Fine Arts 3, 4. 

Restrictive Gym. Exhibition 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Derby Winner 4. 

Second place in Wrestling Match 4. 



Faith "Anne B. Gory" Blake 

Women's Rights Union 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Amazon Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Men's Reform Movement 3, 4. 
Student Council 4. 



Gardner "Blazer" Alexander 

First Prize in Measuring Contest 3. 
Poker Club 1, 3. 
Chapel Attendance 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Vaccination Endurance Contest 4. 



"Stand-Less" Snell 

Davenport Society (Rand Hall) 4. 
Interclass Checker Champ. 1, 2, 3. 
Riverbank Improvement Committee 3, 4. 



Miriam "Goz-a-lot" McMichael 

Ante-Co-education League 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Varsity Club 3. 

Campus Illumination Committee (for im- 
provement of) 3, 4. 



Lewis "Sez-a-lot" Gray 

"We hate women" League 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Men's Rights Union 4. 
Chase Hall Bouncer 1, 2, 3, 4. 



CV<V»CSOCV 




rT^qceKAJVDe^ 



o 
r 



S. Sci)e:cc 








L.G^V 




PAGE TWO HUNDRED SEVENTEEN 










%mmi tbc " r lOO" in 1929 

Tallest Man: Delmont Luce 

Tl:e skyscraping competition ended with "Del" Luce leading all others by 
several feet. 

Tallest Woman: Mary Finn 

Mary took this easily. We wonder if, perhaps, she hasn't been racing with 
her brother Jack? .'.' 

Smallest Man: G. Hartley Curtis 

"Web-foot" Curtis handily wins the honor of being 1929's smallest — so small 
in fact that we lost him somewhere in February. 




Smallest Woman: Greta Thompson 

But Greta wasn't so small that Director Crafts didn't find her to help in the 
college orchestra. 

Biggest Sleepy Head (man): Raymond Nilson 

If Rip Van Winkle had known Nilson, he would have slept for another 
twenty years. In a certain famous battle ten thousand Swedes came out of 
the weeds. One, our hero, remained and slept. Neal Turner might have 
made that second a tie if he hadn't waked up long enough to come to chapel 
that morning. 

Biggest Sleepy Head (woman): Frances MaguirE 

If you feel that you really should get up early to study, but yet don't want 
to — just ask "Fran" to call you! It'll work every time!!! 

Class Grind (man): Edward Bilodeau 

When the large hours of the night make way for those wee hours of the 
morning Bilodeau can always be found at his desk. At any rate, he gets the 
work done ! ! 

Class Grind (woman): Edna York 

A grind a day, we'll all agree 
Is worth it, for a Phi Beta Key. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED EIGHTEEN 




Orator (man)-' Howard Bull 

Walter Hodsdon was a close second here, but Howard must have gotten the 
jump on him through the practice he gets "Caroling". 

Orator (woman): Faith Blake 

Maybe Faith out-voiced Eugenia here by practicing her editorials. 

Most Efficient Man: James Solomon 

Because, besides being Editor-in-Chief of the Mirror, Managing Editor of 
the Student, President of 4A, etc., Jimmy finds plenty of time to be a 
"Mary" (merry) co-educator. 

Most Efficient Woman: Mary Pendlebury 

Mary "Jimmied" her way to a "safe" place here with "Dot" Nutter coming 
in a bit later from "Green", having had trouble with the "Rhodes". 

Class Vamp: Frances Cobb 

Maybe the term class is too restrictive here, yet, we wonder if "Fran" 
is still the class vamp or just has "Ben" (been) ??? Mike speaks for second 
honors. 

Class Sheik: Francis Young 

Shades of Valentino ! ! Francis "Riverbank" Young, for the second consecu- 
tive year is conceded to be our most proficient in that popular indoor sport 
that originated in the tents of Arabia. 

Best Dressed Alan: Allan Nash 

Walking illustrations from Vanity Fair ! ! Everything about Allan has that 
certain primness. 





rnost epficieo»r 




3esr 

JDI?<ESSeD 
WftCV 




Best Dressed Woman: Frances Cobb 

"Fran" might have just stepped out of the Style Show any day. It's funny 
she most always dresses in "Auburn" and is a bit partial to "White". 

Best Athlete (Woman): Florence Kyes 

"Kysie" certainly has put Jay on the Athletic Map!! We sort of suspect 
that she may have coached that Jay team which got into the Basketball Tourn- 
ament this year!? Signed up with the Red Sox yet, Kysie? 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED NINETEEN 




Best Athlete (man): Pierce Mahkr 

Not of the clay of Philistinism is the jovial "Pete" Maher, our hest athlete. 
He, of fame in three sports, is also a good student. Yes, Royal Adams was a 
close second ! ! 

Wittiest Man: John Hassett 

Smiling Hibernian eyes and a flippantly-mirthful tongue label "Johnny" 
Hassett, a humorist. However, the man who wrote "Snowbound" is Whit- 
tier. 





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WlTTlGST 






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f 



Wittiest Woman: Eunice McCue 

"Wanted: Wise-cracks!" Go to Eunice; she has more than a barrel of 'em! 
She sticks in her thumb and pulls out one, polishes it, and hands it to you 
with a blank face and a solemn eye. You should get a patent on those 
"McCueisms", Eunice. 

Biggest Time Killer (man): Raymond Nilson 

Nilson wants to know if he can be convicted for killing time!? We don't 
wonder he got this vote ; that derby and coolie duster are certainly "killing". 

Biggest Time Killer (woman): Betty CoonEy 

Maybe one of the consumers of Betty's time won't care so much for this. 
Anyhow, we're inclined to think the title "Fitz". 

Man Hater: Evelyn Kennard 

Evidently some of the men think Faith is handing them some bouquets, for 
they voted "Ev" Kennard to a winning place in this with Faith "slamming" 
in second. 

Woman Hater: Lewis Gray 

Louis Gray has made the northwest corner of ( >ld Parker a refuge for 
femaleless men. Here in his fortress of misogyny he lives in opposition to 
co-education and everything feminine. But, sh-h ! ! When alone, he takes 
many a furtive fourth-story glance at those he professes to abhor. "Phil" 
Tetreau rated second but we "Betty" (bet he) doesn't belong there!! 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY 



Class Baby (woman): Esther Sargent 

Hey there! Get a "Peram"bulator ; Baby Esther wants to take a ride! 
Mother Sargent washed behind her daughter's ears and sent her to Bates to 
be educated. But! not even an education can mar that "Baby Face". 

Class Baby (man): Gilbert Rhoades 

Gilbert "Bad" Rhoades protested vigorously against this decision, claiming 
that just because he couldn't keep in "Harmony", was no sign that his voice 
hadn't changed. At any rate, we gave him some more Mellen's Food. 

Best Disposition (man): Raymond Nilson and John Hassett tied 

Nilson attributes his good disposition to an abundance of victuals and his 
daily period of dormancy. Why shouldn't "Johnny" Hassett be good- 
natured? His mother allows him to go to the movies every night. 

Best Disposition (woman): Lucy LundELL 

Hair and eyes with the smack and tang of peaceful Scandinavia, cheeks that 
ripple with an incessant smile of congeniality — that's Lucy Lundell ! Room- 
mate, "Eth" Hoyt, smiles her way to a close second ! ! 

Best Dancer (woman): Mildred Young 

Mildred started "Young". Sophomore year her chief interest was in the 
"Larkin" Company. We wonder how the dancing will get on with "Har-old" 
(her old)??? 




'/I 







ecess SfVBies 




Best Dancer (man): Walter Larkin 

Come forth, oh Muse of Dancing, and behold our twentieth-century Terpsi- 
chore! Larkin tripped his finest to win from "Toppy" by a step. 

Best Looking (man): Howard Bull 

The last word in the seniors' masculine pulchritude is Howard Bull. 

Best Looking (woman): Frances Maguire 

That eyes ! ! Those hair ! ! "Fan" may be the biggest sleepy-head but she 
certainly woke up in time to step ahead in this with "Mike" second — or, 
maybe, it's a case of the "Sleeping Beauty"? 

Most Popular^ (man): Royal Adams 

Balloting was not necessary ! Obviously "Roy" is without competition for 
senior popularity at its zenith. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE 




Most Popular (woman): Mary PendlEbury 

Mary, 1929's most popular girl, has gained a favor once vied for by a thou- 
sand women: She is most popular with "Solomon"!! Close on the heels 
of the victor in the contest for senior esteem is "Eth" Hoyt. 

Most Brilliant Man: "Larry" LeBeau 

Phi Beta Kappa, Editor-in-chief of the Student and Business Manager of 
the Mirror!!! No wonder 1929 voted "Larry" its intellectual beacon. 



Most Brilliant Womai 



Miriam McMichael 



"Mike" outshines the rest of 1929 co-eds in this vote. It "Max" (makes) 
no difference in what field. Even Cupid has no easy task keeping up with 
her. 

Noisiest Man: Raymond Nilson 

When Nilson isn't sleeping he keeps the campus uproariously upset with 
ever-reverberating bellows. Much of this uproar occurs when he is engaged 
in his major and minor subjects: football and track, respectively. 

Noisiest Woman: Doris Chick 

"Chick" took this without any competition. We doubt if she would have 
been quiet long enough to hear it if there had been any. 






r^osT 




MOS" 

OJ>OO ftW i 







fV0ISie5T 



Biggest "Line" (man): Walter Hodsdon 

A silvery-tongued "Spanish Athlete" is Walter Hodsdon. We are of the 
opinion that he could sell ducks on the Sahara. From him we learned that 
the only thing found in Lewiston not found in Auburn is the other end of 
the bridge. 

Biggest "Line" (woman): Miriam McMichael 

Another verdict for "Mike", which might apply also in another sense. Shall 
we say "of admirers"? Anyhow, she's got a line, and "Howe"] ! 

Most Talented Man: Stewart Bigelow 

Upon this velocipeding senior we bestow this honor without disparagement. 
Actor, dancer, writer, student, and handshaker supreme are Bigelow's 
qualifications. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-TWO 



Most Talented Woman: Miriam McMichael 

Not so bad — walking away with three votes, already ! ! But how could 
"Mike" help getting this one? A clever debater, musician, actress and writer, 
and "what have you" ? 1929's lucky ! ! 

Best Handshaker (man): Walter Hodsdon 

The seniors regard Walter as a real handshaker. He leaves the "Profs" with 
blistered shoulder blades and hands so compressed by his grip that the fingers 
stick together for hours ! 









B6ST 



W)(VDS(-)G^ 







P10S7 

"PROFESSOR 



Best Handshaker (woman): Miriam McMichael 

Someone certainly had to do some handshaking to keep up with Walter! 
The class voted "Mike" pretty well up in this competition since she keeps the 
hands "Bob"bing. 

Happiest Man: Raymond Nilson 

As happy as a butcher's dog is Nilson ; who, with his characteristic avaricious- 
ness, hogs his fifth title. 

Happiest Woman: Ethelyn Hoyt 

"Eth" Hoyt, again ; this time in the role of our happiest senior co-ed. No 
camel was ever more contented on an oasis than is "Eth" here at Bates. 

Most Popular Professor: Prop. Tubbs 

We're pleased to see "Doc" Tubbs stand at the head in this vote. Yes, he 
does encourage "star-gazing". 

Most Popular Subject: Geology 

Evidently the seniors believe it best to "come down to earth". We rather 
expected Astronomy might rate here. The members of that class must have 
overslept after a night under the stars. 

Favorite Actor 

Voting for this superlative was just a matter of form — Bigelow, of course ! 
When not acting he takes long tours on the "Pike" on his bicycle. 

Favorite Actress 

Besides being popular off-stage Mary has the class vote for favorite actress. 
Guess we like you in any role, Mary ! 

Favorite Pastime 

Dancing "stepped" in here with sleeping (due to Nilson and "Fran" 
Maguire) and movies tied for second place. 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE 



Skanbal - - Snintml 



FOR GIRLS ONLY 

jjjAuBiu ;nq ijjuo }oj^[ ,;Aruo sA"oq joi siqi 3>jij a"to}s b p^aj 3ABq pmoM 

sjaiS AuBiu a\cj-[ j j snouno 3jb spnS Xbs noX }3a" pue — siip pnaa pnoA" a\3ujj 

A SENIOR RECIPE 

Preserved "Pairs" 

These are to be put up in cans just for two. After sterilizing jars fill them 
carefully in the following order : 

Viola Zahn-"Stan" Snell 

"Dot" Lane-"Roy" Adams 

"Pris" Lunderville-Maynard Colley 

Yvonne Langlois-" Bobbie" Berkelman (faculty flavoring) 

Pour over these a sugar syrup. You cannot get this too sweet ! ! Seal tightly 
and place on exhibition. Zenith (1917) 

THE MIRACLE 

G. Alexander (Scotch) takes "Abie" (a little Ragamuffin) to the movies. 

G. Alex, (on way walking downtown) : "Hurry up, Abie, or ve'l miss de first 
show ! !" (arrived downtown) "Ah ! here's a good place vere ve see de show 
for 15 cents, for vich ve get four pictures. Let's go in here. Oh, but vait a 
minute, 'Abie', der's a place down the street vere I see dere is a show for ten cents, 
for vich ve get also four pictures!! Come on, 'Abie', ve vil go in dere!" They 
enter (after G. Alex, digs the 10 cents out of his pocketbook; 'Abie' is under 12 
so docs not have to pay). 

G. Alex.: "Oh, vat nize, soft seats, 'Abie'!! Vots dat you say, Madame? 
I'm sitting on your lap? Pardon me, I thot it vas plush cushions. Vot's dat, 
'Abie'? You vant some candy to eat in the show? Look under the seat, 'Abie', 
you vill find some gum there ! !" 

Whereupon, G. Alex, settles himself to get his 10 cents worth!! 



Carl Woodcock says: "When some folks come out of the barber shop you 
wonder if they have been waited on." ? ? ? ? 



PAGE TWO HUNDRED TWENTY-FOUR 




(^Acknowledgments^ 



£7^HE management of the 1929 

vL^ Mirror wishes to express its 

appreciation to the following who 

have helped make the publication 



a success 



Merrill & Webber Company 
Howard-Wesson Company 
Harry Plummer 
Dora Clark Tash 
College Publicity Bureau 
Professor Karl Woodcock 
Gordon McKay 
1929 Mirror Staff 
Advertisers 



/assi 




D 



Compliments of 

Lamey - ^Vellehan 

footwear and 
furnishings 

110 Lisbon Street 
LEWISTON, MAINE 



<i7urs l^emodeled Tel. hemstitching 

at 'Treasonable A C f H Treating, ^Button 
'Prices ^f JO / (Making 



M. BARON 

Qleaner^tyurrier^^ailor 

Auburn, Maine Lewiston, Maine 

BERRY PAPER CO. 

49 Lisbon Street 
Lewiston, Maine 

"your Stationer " 



<><Z><l(><^><)<><^><)<><^^<><I><><><^ 



Dr. W. J. CARTER 

"Dentists 

25 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 

THE HAT & FROCK SHOPPE, INC. 

" The Little Shoppe with the Green Door" 





45 


LISBON STREET 

Telephone 1733-R 


HATS 
ROCKS 






HOSIERY 
UNDERWEAR 



Eyesight is your oJVCost 
^Priceless Possession 



Optometry 

the aid to good vision 
and eye comfort 



D. E. PLAISTED 

Optometrist— 

14 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 
Over Liggett's Riker-Jaynes 









^gsag y 



r j^j. 



Compliments of 



Ernest Saunders 



^lorisps 



578 MAIN STREET 23 LISBON STREET 



Lewiston, Maine 



<HCI>0<><C=>00<r>0<><Z>0<><^^<><Z>0!H^^O<r>0!>^^ 



(Compliments of 



L S. DURGIN 



Insurance 



^arnstone-Qsgood Qo. 



Diamond Merchants 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL WATCHES 

CLOCKS AND JEWELRY 

SINCE 1859 



50 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Maine 



(Compliments of 

(fJYlaine Qandy and 
^Products Qompany 

WHOLESALE 

CONFECTIONERS 

76 Main Street, Lewiston, Maine 



D 



RIDE IN INSURED CARS 



4040 



FOR REAL COURTEOUS SERVICE 



UNION SQUARE TAXI CO 

171 MAIN STREET, LEWISTON, ME. 



24 Hour Service 25 Cents Local Rates 

o<i>oo<cr>oo<^>oo<^>0!><cr>o&<z>M<^ 



Telephone 339-W 



Qentral Optical Qo. 

E. L. VINING, Proprietor 

<r Rggistered Optometrist 

We Fit, Make and Repair 
GLASSES 



¥ 



26 Lisbon Street, Levviston, Me. 



Gowns - Hoods - Caps 

FOR ALL DEGREES 
=^= 

WE GUARANTEE 

Selective cTYlaterials 
^Accuracy in "Detail 
Superior "Workmanship 
"Treasonable "Trices 

lb 



An old and reliable firm 
Established 1832 



Cottrell &. Leonard 

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 

Albany, N. Y. 



□ 



FOR FOUR YEARS 
WE HAVE SERVED 



REAL FOOD 



WHEN YOU RETURN 
TO BATES COME TO 



RuIl6 



LUNCH 



These four years have passed 
quickly, and now we must part, 

We wish you "the best" as you 
graduate and enter the various 
fields of endeavor. 

Call on us when you visit your 
Alma Mater — we shall always 
remember you. 



"^he Quality Shop" 



143 COLLEGE STREET 



<*£^><))<^^!><Z^t><ZZ><)t)<Z^t><^>Q<)<Z^ 



Service and £)uality 



You'll find GROCERIES, 
SPECIALTIES and 

CONFECTIONERY at 

THE 

BOSTON 

TEA STORE 

S. S. WOODBURY, Prop. 

Telephone 153 

18 Lisbon Street, Lewiston, Me. 

'fohe ^Beit in Everything 



Compliments of 



J. 23. Lamontagne^ 
Qompany^ 

Lewiston, : eTXCaine 




A REAL CHANCE 



TO BUY SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS AT 
GREATLY REDUCED 
PRICES 



H 



L* E* Flanders &L Co. 



62 COURT STREET, AUBURN, MAINE 



STEAKS — CHO PS — OYSTERS 

Two Best Places 
to Eat : 

HOME AND 
BILL WHITE'S 

Bates Street Quick Lunch 

ALL HOME COOKING 
Sport News by Radio while you eat 

Open 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

HOME MADE PIES 



(kzx &<cr><;<><cr>«o<rr>o<Ki^o<c^><)o<c^ 



When Better Printing is built 
Bartlett will build it. 



with apologies to Buick Company 



1?tti£ %i$* 



•-■>■.■ ■,..■■.■■. »»-- 

■-■-■ , 



■'•» ■* ■%*»"* <| 



T^emember 

DORA CLARK TASH 

Photographer 



MADE MANY OF YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS 



139 Main Street, Opposite Empire Theatre 



LEWISTON, MAINE 



Telephone 228 



(Compliments of 



fy. Is). "Woolworth Qo. 



(Compliments of 

FIRST 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

LEWISTON, MAINE 



Compliments of 



^he ^Bates 
(fJYCanufacturing Qo. 

Lewiston, <fM.aine 



Compliments of 



Lelviston ^leachery 
and "Dye 'Works 



(Compliments of 

Walton's Bakery 




AUBURN 



MAINE 




"NT 



o<z>o&<rr>o<><rr>o»<rr>oo<z>0!><c^o<^^ 

COLLEGE STUDENTS | p er kins & Curtis 

EVERYWHERE 



USE OUR PLAN 

TO COMPLETE THEIR 

FINANCES 

LET US EXPLAIN HOW 



MORRIS 
.PLAN 



L,eu>iston^cAuburn branch 

Morris Plan Bank 

167 Lisbon Street Telephone 4382 



Incorporated 



Tlumbing^ c 3£eating 
and Sheet ePKCetal 



6 MINOT AVENUE 
AUBURN, MAINE 



D 





Howard-Wesson Co. 

Worcester; Mass. 

THE COLLEGE ENGRAVERS 
ofmW ENGLAND 



Conveniently Located, With Years of 
Experience in Producing College Annuals 
rjeady to Give ^Ybu Complete Service 

Business Managers and Editors 
our Constructive Help. 




our Liberal Contract 




Designing 

Ketouchind" 

Half Tones, Color S Platcs 



I 



mm ^ 
mm Ft 






TfiL' Finest Engraving" 
Shop in New England 



LlB^M^" 7^rliMW,Pn'ntcrstBldg. 



"fVe made the engravings for this publication"' 




n 



(Compliments of 



S* S* Kresge Qo. 



THE GREEN FRONT STORE 

120 Lisbon Street 

and 

THE RED FRONT STORE 

60 Lisbon Street 



LEWISTON, MAINE 



( \Karry jl. ^Tlummer 

124 Lisbon Street 
Lewiston, Maine 



% 



sMaker of 

^Reliable ^Thotographs^ 



d<Z><)<}<Z><)<><^>0!K^^<l<=I>Q!><Z^ 



S}uality ^urs . . . 




Established 1873 



c d r ur Scarfs 
e^YCodern Qold Storage 

T. J. MURPHY FUR CO. 

29 Ash Street, Lewiston, Maine 



YOU 



COLLEGE MEN CAN GET 
THE VERY LATEST IN 



Qood (Clothes 

At very reasonable 
prices at 

COBURN'S 

bailors 

Cohurn Block 240 Main Street 

LEWISTON, MAINE 



□ 




ICE CPEAA4 



MANUFACTURED AND DISTRIBUTED 



BY THE 

SIMMONS & HAMMOND MFG. CO. 



D<T>to<Cr><KKZ>O0<^>to<C^$<C>W<^^ 



LEWISTON'S LEADING 
SHOE 

The Traveler Shoe 

One Price ^s 
only — t 

Specializing in 
Collegiate Styles for 
Men and Women 

REMEMBER THE ADDRESS 

54 LISBON STREET 




c54rry intelligent person knows 
it pays to keep cleans 



We are expecting considerable 

business from Bates College 

Students 



« 



Norris-Hayden 
Laundry Co. 

AUBURN, MAINE 



□ 



(Compliments of 

TUFTS BROTHERS 

Printing Specialists 

RUBBER STAMP MANUFACTURERS 
193 Middle Street - - - Lewiston, Maine 



QUALITY and Telephone 

SERVICE 29-W 



Judkins Laundry, inc. 

FRED H. TUFTS, Pres. G. ROYAL TUFTS, Vice-Pres. 

GEORGE W. TUFTS, Manager and Treasurer 



HAROLD W. RICHARDSON, '30 

LIVINGSTON H. LOMAS, '30 

Agents 



Pecks 



Merchandise of Merit Since 1880 



In Step 'With Style for 
tyorty-nine years 



Ernest Jordan 

61 COLLEGE STREET 

LEWISTON, MAINE 



YOUR INVARIABLE SHOPPING 
INSURANCE IS MAINTAINED BY 
THE FUNDAMENTAL POLICY 

"Tech's is U\[eyer 

Knowingly Undersold" 

Lewiston 
Trust Company 

u cA Qomplete ^cuityng Service" 



°S 



LEWISTON 

MECHANIC FALLS 



LISBON FALLS 
FREEPORT 




BATES STREET 
CIGAR COMPANY 



'Wholesale and T^etoil 



s~> 



Agents for 

ZA-REX 

Pure Fruit 
Syrups 

Daggetts 
Chocolates 



Cigars, 
^obacco^ 
Cigarettes and 
Confectionery 



R. W. CLARK 



'Druggists 



RELIABLE 
PROMPT 
ACCURATE 
COURTEOUS 



28 Ash Street, LEWISTON, MAINE 

Telephone 1738-M Corner Main and Bates Streets 

o<~z>co<i>c<><cr>co<rr>c<><c^<Kcr>co<c^ 



Czcnin $$mt 



¥TD 




Sell Qood Clothes' 



LEWISTON, MAINE 



FIRST in History 

FIRST in Quality 

FIRST in Service 

BEST in Price 



to 



cApollo Lunch 

LISBON STREET 
LEWISTON, MAINE 



i i 



□ 



All Good 



Remember 



THINGS 



TO EAT 



COME FROM 

The Buffet Lunch 

231 MAIN STREET 
LEWISTON, MAINE 



Class of '29 — 

Remember us when you come to eat 



FURS REMODELED AND REPAIRED 

LADIES' AND GENT'S GARMENTS 

ALTERED, CLEANED, PRESSED 

AND REPAIRED 



« 



THE NATIONAL TAILORING 

(Ladies' and Qent's Suits 
eOMade to Order 



Telephone 1909-M 



244 Main Street, LEWISTON, ME. 



Albert & Ouellette 



^Morticians 



PROMPT AMBULANCE SERVICE 
DAY AND NIGHT 



2 Howe Street Lewiston, Maine 



Compliments of 



Lewiston 
Shoe Hospital 



^he calender of 
'Bates Soles " 



7 SABATTUS STREET 

LEWISTON, MAINE 



D 



I 



em 



n 



HPhe cover for 
this annual 
was created by 
The DAVID J. 
MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



¥P 



tyor four years 

we have 

been friends ^ 



KD 



tp 



*& 



c54s cAlumni 

Qome and see us 



THE COLLEGE STORE 



0<3>«:><rr><>>crr><)K=>o»<cr>O!Kr=>o:K^z>oj<^^ 



(Compliments of 



J. W. WHITE COMPANY 




ston, 



© 



"WHITCO" Building Materials are the BEST 






-r .; 










T 



HE BATES MIRROR 



ounce 



MERRILL & WEBBER 



SPECIALISTS IN 
HIGH SCHOOL 
AND COLLEGE 
PUBLICATIONS 



7i 



J 



OFFICE, 95-99 MAIN STREET 
AUBURN, MAINE 






V 










(Compliments of 



£A friend 



^ 



}<cr>«Kzr>0!)<c^>o(><r^^><cz>«!><^>«>cz>o>cz>^ 




DEWITT HOTEL 



Charles B. Day 

Manager 



Offers you its homelike hospitality, 
service and comfort 



LeU'islon : " ^he Industrial ^eart of (fMaine "